toadlily
Full Member
Posts: 14
Joined: Sat Jun 05, 2004 5:08 pm
Location: Texas

ditch lilies

I am making a trip to Wisonsin in June. I am hoping to find what I remember to be called "Ditch Lilies". I remember them as a child growing wild and haven't seen them since then. I remember them as orange with black spots. THey have a daylily type of foliage. Has any one seen them or know if I am on the right track.

Thanks

The Helpful Gardener
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Posts: 7493
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:17 am
Location: Colchester, CT

Sounded like a tiger lily until you got to the daylily foliage; pretty common "wildflower" (it is actually a transplant, albeit a fairly harmless one)...

[url]https://plantsdatabase.com/go/1025/[/url]

Scott[/url]

toadlily
Full Member
Posts: 14
Joined: Sat Jun 05, 2004 5:08 pm
Location: Texas

Ditch Lily

I thought i replied to this post. Looks like I didn't.

Do you know the name of the wildflower? I went to the link and it was for the Tiger. I have been surfing the net trying to come up with the flower name. I could sure use some help. Where was it a transplant from? What is the name? That type of thing. Have you seen a pic of it? Sorry for all the questions but you are the first person that seems to know what I am talking about.

stormy_nanci
Newly Registered
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Jul 15, 2004 12:30 am

The name of the wildflower ditch lily that you are looking for is Hemerocalis Fulva. I hope this helps. I think they're beautiful and add a lot to the landscape but they are very agressive so be careful where you plant them.

Nancy

The Helpful Gardener
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Posts: 7493
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:17 am
Location: Colchester, CT

Hemerocallis fulva is usually called Tawny daylily, and the foliage you described was a daylily. The flower you described was Tiger lily (Lilium lancifolium), a Chinese transplant, but in that neck of the woods you also have native red lilies (L. philadelphicum) that are often called tiger lilies, but lack the black spots. So look carefully at foliage AND flower and you'll be able to i.d. the plant in question...

Scott

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