Stormwarrior
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Winter food advice!

If someone lived in a country where it was permanently winter, cold and snowy all the time, what fruit and vegetables could they grow for food?

cynthia_h
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Historically, I believe the people of Russia and the Scandinavian countries had the shortest growing seasons. Peoples on the North American continent were hunters and gatherers into the colonial era, and thus had (probably) more balanced diets than the Russian/Scandinavian agriculturalists.

Among these agriculturalists, root vegetables such as potatoes, rutabagas, beets, turnips, and parsnips were a mainstay.

Among the grains, rye and oats are highly represented in these traditional cuisines (Russian black bread, Swedish & Norwegian sourdough rye breads).

Among the fruits, apples, apples, and more apples.

These agricultural products were supplemented by dried fish.

Is this the kind of information you are seeking?

Cynthia H.
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Stormwarrior
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Can you grow that stuff during the cold, frosty winter though? What if there were no seasons, it was just cold, snowy and frosty all the time?

Are there any plants that can grow in snow?

cynthia_h
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Cold, snowy and frosty all the time...hmmm..sounds like the Inuit, Lapps, and other peoples of the Far North.

They hunted caribou and fished the open seas. Very little plant intake; maybe some berries in the Arctic summer.

I think the concept you're looking for is the "growing season." A short growing season of 90 days or less is, by and large, what the Russians, Scandinavians, and Scots dealt with; thus the short list of foods.

Some root veggies will KEEP in cold situations; I personally don't know which ones and for how long.

But nothing that I'm aware of will germinate (sprout and begin to grow) outdoors in harsh winter conditions.

That's why, historically, peoples of the Far North (Inuit, Lapps, Siberian nomads) kept animals (caribou/reindeer/elk), hunted animals, or fished for a living. There was no way to grow food, so they had to herd/hunt it.

Cynthia

Stormwarrior
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But what did the animals eat if there were no plants for months on end?

J-veg
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for the land animals: grasses and bits of evergreens... which is to tough for human digestion however so it wasn't considered a food source

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hendi_alex
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Did you have some place in mind? I agree with the previous poster that the Inuit most readily comes to mind. Most of their diet came from the ocean or was probably related to migratory animals, caribou and pehaps birds. Even the Inuit probably had access to arable land, as most anyone has seen some of the giant veggies that are grown in parts of Alaska. Have not researched caribou migration but would have to assume that trek corresponds to the brief bloom in the arctic region, otherwise doubt they would continue that far. But where is there a population of mamals and no growing season. I would suggest nowhere, unless a food source is somehow be imported or is migrating in to the area.

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