S. Silver
Newly Registered
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Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 9:50 pm

zucchini plant yellowing

I have a zucchini plant in a container. The plant is starting to yellow, starting with the stem and the leaves nearby, although the furthest leaves are still pretty green. Also, the blossoms fall off without producing zucchini, but I guess that's a pollination issue. Why is the plant yellowing? over or under watering? needs fertilizer? any suggestions?? Thanks.

opabinia51
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Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2004 9:58 pm
Location: Victoria, BC

Yellowing is generally a lack of Nitrogen. Pots often become deficient in nutrients that need to be constantly restocked. A liquid fish or seaweed fertilizer will help. Though, it may be to late.

Good luck.

grandpasrose
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Location: Quesnel, BC, Canada - Zone 4a

I don't think it will be too late. It is amazing how quickly plants reflect a shot of nitrogen nutrients. You may lose a few leaves on the bottom, but the rest of the plant should pick up. :wink:
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)

S. Silver
Newly Registered
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 9:50 pm

yellow leaves

Thanks. I'll try the nitrogen, though it may be too late. I should have thought of asking about this a few weeks ago...

The Helpful Gardener
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Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:17 am
Location: Colchester, CT

Organic nitrogen is best; just like Opa said...

HG

S. Silver
Newly Registered
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 9:50 pm

dead zucchini

I tried the nitrogen. Too late. The zucchini are compost. But thanks to all. Wait till next year! (But the tomato plants look ok. I'm kind of holding my breath...)

opabinia51
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 4659
Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2004 9:58 pm
Location: Victoria, BC

Well rotted manure is a good source of organic Nitrogen as is Liquid fish fertilizer. Zucchini love manure, I mix the manure with leaf mulch just to provide some good structure to the soil as well. Not to mention micronutrients.
Tomatoe plants love liquid fish fertilizer. I give my tomatoe plants (in pots this year) a blast of it (1/2 cup with 4 litres (1 gallon) of water) once a week all growing season and they always look great and give me really high yields. Liquid seaweed fertilzer is also really good for tomatoe plants. Or you can buy some kelp meal and add that your the soil when you plant the tomatoe plants.


-------some time later----------

Just had an idea. Last year, I did some mustards and some squash in a few pots. I built the potting soil out of mushroom manure, soil, worm castings and some kelp meal. Even with the constant watering, the plants did really well and did not suffer from any nutrient deficiencies.

With oranic bound nutrients, the nutrients themselves are part of the humus and not in solution (floating around as ions in the soil) and therefore are not leached out of the soil during watering. What happens is, the plants release chemical (acids) that dissociate the nutrients from the humus when the plant needs them.

Worked great last year. Try it next year with your zucchini and don't forget that liquid fertilizer. It can only help.

The Helpful Gardener
Mod
Posts: 7493
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:17 am
Location: Colchester, CT

There's the great beauty in organic gardening. The nutrients stay put...

Blue juice (you know, the fertilizer of choice for millions) is going to wash out of the soil and into our lakes and streams, where it speeds eutrophication and causes algal blooms that kill fish and stink to high heavens. Same goes for the thousands of tons of nitrogen we dump on our lawns each year; kill your lawn and turn it into organic gardens and the world will be the better for it! 8)

Scott

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