newbie
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Location: Brantford, ON, Canada

Unknown Ivy Is taking control

Hello Everyone,

I am brand new to this site, and a brand new gardener if I can even call myself that. I just bought a new home, and have my very own yard to look after now, which is proving to be much more difficult than expected, here is my dilema:

The past owners planted an Ivy all along one of the fences in our back yard. It does great to block out the visibility of the adjoiining neighbours yards, but it spreads like crazy, and takes control of any other plant near it. It also seems to be popping up in other places in the yard, 10-15 feet awat from the fence. I guess my question is what you suggest. Is there any other plant that will help with the visibility issue but not take control of the backyard? Just today I was trimming the Ivy and I realized there was a whole other garden underneath it that was being choked out by all of its trailings... PLEASE help, if you need any other information let me know, haha as I said Im new to this, so any help is really appreciated,

Thanks Again :D
The Newbie To Gardening

grandpasrose
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Is there any way of sending a photo of the ivy so we know what type you are talking about?
Some types of vines can be cut right back and do quite well and this keeps them from spreading so badly.
Are you wanting to totally replace this vine?
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)

The Helpful Gardener
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Probably English ivy (a Federal Invasive) and it can take down trees with a few years head start. Shallow rooter so hand pulling can work wonders; send a picture and we can be sure...

HG

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Grey
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Location: Summerville, GA, Zone 7a

If it is English Ivy (and despite its invasiveness, I still like it), you can cut it off the trees at waist-level and let the top part of the vine die. From there I'm told it can be pulled down once it's fully dead (I'm new to having this vine myself) or I've noticed a lot of my neighbors just let it hang dead up there to rot.

It does pull up easily, which is nice. I've discovered the dark backdrop is really nice with some yellow tulips and such, but it seems the best way to protect those tulips is to keep them in pots around the ivy so it doesn't invade their space.

newbie
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Joined: Fri Jul 29, 2005 5:20 pm
Location: Brantford, ON, Canada

Thanks:)

Hey Thank you guys so much for posting replys:) I agree with you Grey I do really like the look of the vine, and yeah I have heard from people around here that it is english ivy. I like how well it can conceal the neighbours hards, I guess my question is what the best way to keep it from spreading is. Should I simply keep on top of it and regulary cut and pull new growth? Thanks again
A Newbie To The Garden

grandpasrose
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Location: Quesnel, BC, Canada - Zone 4a

You could try enclosing it in some kind of barrier in the ground - metal or wood, to prevent spreading. Other than that, just keeping on top of new growth is it! It is very nice to have in the right place. :wink:
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)

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WHacking it back works for a long time, but it eventually berries and becomes bird distributed, and THAT is where the nightmare begins...

HG

frogesque
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I lived in Northern Ireland (Co. Armagh) for 3 years and I didn't grow ivy there - I fought it! The mild, damp climate really suited it and it would self set (bird dispersal) in any border, nook, cranny or recess it could find. I've seen 50ft. trees totally choked with it that have died. Also it's not good for walls although it can look attractive. It harbours many insects and the dampness entrained can affect mortar. It can have its place but be ruthless with it and don't let it get out of control. In its favour the flowers, though insignificant, are a magnet for late summer bees and butterflies and is ideal for covering an ugly fence or as part of a 'wild' area. If it's proscribed in your State or area though it would be irresponsible to plant or encorage it.

The leaves and stems can cause contact dermatitis and the black berries are also poisonous to pets and humans!

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The cities of Seattle and San Francisco have actually had volunteer groups pop up that eradicate nothing else but Hedera helix. I have grown this as a houseplant and might still do that, but it doesn't belong outside in North America (and much as it's European, it sounds like it's an issue in Ireland as well...)

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