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JennyC
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Mystery clear goo on peaches

Some of my developing peaches have droplets or tiny streams of clear goo on them -- looks sort of like snot (sorry). Any ideas what it is/ what to do? I'm gardening organically, though (on the advice of my county extension agent) I already plan to use Joy in water to try to discourage the bugs from eating all the peaches. The "snot" doesn't seem to be doing any damage (yet), but doesn't seem right, either.

I should add that I'm a complete peach tree newbie, though this is a very established tree that came with the house and farm I'm on. I'm right on the line between Zone 7a and 7b, so I'm excited to see peaches at all.

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Jess
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Hi Jenny :D

It sounds like Peach tree borer damage. Here is some information....
https://www.ext.colostate.edu/PUBS/INSECT/05566.html
Knowing without doing is like plowing without sowing."

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JennyC
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Hi, Jess, and thanks for the link.

My problem, though, is that I'm getting clear goo on the peaches themselves, but no sign of it on the trunk or bark anywhere. So that seems a little less like peach borers.

I can't check for peach borer "sawdust" around the base of the trunk as your link suggests because this tree was almost completely overgrown with English Ivy, which I've managed to cut back, but not without some bark damage. I'm thinking it might be a good idea to apply white latex paint to the damaged trunk as the link you provided suggests to keep out the borers next season.

But I think that still leaves me with the mystery of "snotty" peaches this year.

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Jess
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:oops: That will be because I did not read the post properly!!
On the peaches themselves? Thats a new one on me.
Hopefully someone will know the answer... :roll:
Knowing without doing is like plowing without sowing."

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JennyC
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Snotty peach update

The latest development is I just spotted a nasty-looking white spot on one of the peaches with snot. No sign of spots on other ones yet, but I'll keep an eye on them.
Jenny C

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Gnome
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Jenny,

The first step is identifying the culprit. Look closely at the source of the sap. Is there a crescent shaped scar? If so this is likely the work of the 'Plum Curculio" a pest that effects stone fruits.

[img]https://www.canr.msu.edu/vanburen/pcfscar.jpg[/img]

Norm

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JennyC
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Gnome: Okay, I've been looking closely. There is usually a scar detectable at the source of the sap, but it isn't necessarily crescent-shaped. I've seen one crecent, and many roundish or straightish. I do have an infestation, I think, and it's gotten most of the peaches. I'm spraying with Joy in water every few days (sooner if it rains) in hopes of saving some.

If I'm looking at 'Plum Curculio" and if it's not a total loss yet, is there anything else organic I can do?

Meanwhile, I've been dropping fallen peaches in my compost heap -- think this is okay?
Jenny C

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Gnome
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Jenny,

I only have had one experience with these pests, at least I think that's what they were as I never actually saw the culprit. I tried to remove the fallen fruits as you are but never managed to overcome them. My plum tree was old and in decline and when another tree fell on it I decided to just remove it.
Meanwhile, I've been dropping fallen peaches in my compost heap -- think this is okay?
If your compost is 'hot' then I think that is OK, otherwise I would dispose of them in a closed plastic bag in the trash.

Now that you have a likely suspect you can use Google to look into it. Sorry I can't help more.

Norm

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JennyC
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Norm, you helped tremendously. I think that is my culprit, now that I've done more research. And now I know what to do next year (start spraying at blossom fall). We'll see in a year if the Joy treatment is effective. Meanwhile, I may still get a few peaches this year. It's just that I may have to buy from the local farmer's market (also known as the side of the road near the courthouse in town) to make my pickled peaches.
Jenny C

muddifingers
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Mystery goo on peaches

Hi Jenny,
I am new to the peach trees too and have noticed the same goo on the peaches of one of my trees. Just wondering if you had found any more info on the problem? I'm not coming up with much on the internet. Was wondering if the peaches are still ok to eat? I've made some jam with the peaches and have tried to avoid the goo, but may have trace amounts in there. I'd appreciate any help. I have noticed that with time and age the goo seems to be disappearing.
Thanks

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JennyC
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Hi, muddifingers,

I lost most of my peaches, so I'm not sure about edibility. Mine mostly rotted or mummified on the tree. I am going to use any I can salvage (one, so far!) -- my guess is that any peach flesh that isn't damaged and that ripens is okay, but that's a guess.

Do clean up any diseased peaches from the ground -- there's where the baby bugs winter over. I'm going to try the soap spray at blossom fall -- that's when the bugs get in, and I'll keep it up as it rains and washes it off. This year, I was definitely too late to do any good.
Jenny C

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hendi_alex
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I planted peach trees several years ago. Encountered the problems discussed here plus others. Came to the conclusion that peach trees are very high maintenance requiring a rigorous spraying schedule. Too much dampness and the crop is lost to brown spot. Sandy soil and the trees slowly succumb to the work of root knot nemotodes. And then there are tree borers, fruit borers and heaven knows what else. I have been riding through McBee all through this spring and summer. McCleod farms has a huge peach operation there, probably one of the biggest in the state. Anyway most every trip the machines with large sprayers are at work and the workers all have on hazmat suits and look like moon walkers. For my area here in S.C. decided to give up on peaches and focus on low maintenace fruits. Blueberry, pears, strawberries, rasberries, are easy to grow, require no special care, and have little to no pests in this area. IMO there is no good reason to fight a never ending battle with the difficult to grow, when there are so many equally good selections that are easy and care free.
Last edited by hendi_alex on Tue Aug 05, 2008 8:52 pm, edited 2 times in total.

gardentoad
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I'm ready to give up on peaches too.
I have tried picking up every , even the tiniest peaches and twigs and every leaf that fell. I thinned out many branches for really good air circulation. I sprayed with neem oil as soon as the petals fell.
I have the gobs oll over them again this year.
In the past it was leaf curl and then black sooty peaches, and then the brown mumy peaches.
It's always something.

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JennyC
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I know what you guys mean. I certainly wouldn't plant peaches myself, but the two trees were here when we moved in, so I'm going to give it a try again next year. I'd sure like some pickles peaches, and I'm way too cheap to buy them just for pickling!
Jenny C

cynthia_h
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Be sure to treat them this winter when they're dormant. Not sure which school of organic gardening you follow, but there's bound to be an acceptable dormant treatment which will help these trees.

Also get some advice on how best to prune them! Trees are stressed when they must support "extra" growth (well, producing fruit is also a stress, but we want to stress them the "right way"! :lol:)

And the lack of rain probably played a large part in the trees' stress this year as well.

But give 'em their best shot at production next year by dormant treatment and pruning, as well as a thorough clean-up of the ground beneath them.

Best wishes.

Cynthia H.
USDA Zone 9, Sunset Zone 17

muddifingers
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Thanks for all the help. It seems like the goo is now gone. We've had a wet spring and summer here so maybe it was a result from that. We do have brown rot and mummy peaches. We just try to get them off the tree and ground as soon as possible and get them out in the garbage instead of the compost pile. Thanks for the soapy solution idea. I'll try that come next spring. We bought this house a couple of years ago and it has many fruit trees from peaches, to apples, to pears, figs and paw
paws even. We don't have much experience with gardening and with all the "problems" that come with growing our own fruit and vegetables. And just to increase our difficulty I'm trying to stay organic.

mattperry8503
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Re: Mystery clear goo on peaches

:D okay hello this is to Jenny c I looked up things and on my peach tree the young peaches are doing the very same thing think this is caused by a moth it's called oriental fruit moth they recommend using permethrine spray which is all natural perethrine is made from mums which is a flower try this on spraying them once every two weeks while in fruit till fruit is ripe and yes pick all infected peaches up throw them in a trash bag and give to your garbage man hope this helps in three years I have gotten one peach but it was great and the very best I have eaten

JONA
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Re: Mystery clear goo on peaches

If it is oriental Moth then it can be monitored by a pheromone trap rather like you would with Codling Moth on apples.. This would give you an exact timing as to when to spray. Good control in April to late May is usually sufficiant.
If you do need to spray, try to use something that will only harm the target...not the 'goodies' in the garden. For instance Bt which only effects caterpillars,grubs/worms.
John



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