jeanius7
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Joined: Sat Jul 23, 2005 4:45 am

Hyssop Bonsai beginning kit

I have read your site and even tried to google Hyssop bonsai to try to find instructions but haven't found anything that answers my questions. I just want to know how to take care of it for the first couple of months. After that, I feel like I would be in the clear from "problems".

The instructions tell me to plant 3-5 seeds, pat firmly, and keep the soil moist. When it is growing, would I want it to sit it outside, inside next to the window, or a mixture of both? Also, when will I know when its time to start pruning?

I know I won't have to worry about cutting any roots for a while, but when would be a good time...after a year or so?

And also, my location is in Tallahassee Florida.

Sorry to inundate you with so many questions on a first post. Thanks for the help. Can't wait to hear your suggestions.

-Daniel

The Helpful Gardener
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I hesitate to answer this here as Hyssop is a perennial. While perennials are occasionally offered as adjunct plants to bonsai, they are not really bonsai in and of themselves. The training is not as it would be for bonsai; you are basically developing a woody trunk and resprouting the plant every year from that wood. It will not be a long lived project as perennials generally hate coming from old wood and that's what you are trying to attain with the bonsai process; sort of working at cross ends, right?

While it might make for an interesting experiment, it would never make a true bonsai; and while bonseki are often interesting in themselves they are add-ons to bonsai, not a stand alone display...


Scott

jeanius7
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Joined: Sat Jul 23, 2005 4:45 am

Thanks for the information. I think this will be just the precursor to getting a true bonsai. From what I have read in this forum, I should just buy a “treeâ€

The Helpful Gardener
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Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:17 am
Location: Colchester, CT

Try a tropical like a Ficus before trying an evergreen; they're less tougher to do ...


Scott

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