smp928s
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Unknown Fruit Tree Identification

Hi Everyone! I'm new here to the forum and I'm trying to identify a tree that has had me curious for some time. The tree is located in a historic old cemetery in Upstate NY (the gravesite of a U.S. President is in this cemetery). In the fall I noticed the tree had shed small orange fruits (by the time I saw them they were well rotted) with small roughly dime sized almond shaped seeds. The fruits were probably about the size of a golf ball. The tree is quite huge, probably over 30-40 feet tall. I have attached a couple photos. I had thought this was an apricot tree but I'm really not sure. I hope these photos help in the identification. These were taken today, March 30.
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AnnaIkona
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Re: Unknown Fruit Tree Identification

A pear tree? Maybe...
My sister's tree looks like that and produces the tinest sour pears. (3 inches)
Zone 8b, Canada

smp928s
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Re: Unknown Fruit Tree Identification

I don't believe it is pear.

AnnaIkona
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Re: Unknown Fruit Tree Identification

May I know why not?
Zone 8b, Canada

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applestar
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Re: Unknown Fruit Tree Identification

I'm thinking American persimmon.

Mine is a variety called Prok and produces slightly larger, apricot-shaped fruits, but more common Meader, etc. varieties produce small flattened tomato-shaped fruits.

Subject: Fruit Harvest from season to season
applestar wrote:More photos of the Prok persimmon. I have one espaliered tree. It is self fruitful. The fruits are about 2 inches diameter.

Image

I like that the espaliered branches are within easy reach. I pick them when they are actually soft and "gives" and easily twist off the branch with or without the calyx., then keep at room temperature wrapped in paper towels or napkins. They are better eating one or two days later when they are soft with consistency of soft apricots. By third day, they will start to liquefy and turn into jam like consistency inside the skin. Though still good, I think they actually start to lose their peak sweetness at this point.
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smp928s
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Re: Unknown Fruit Tree Identification

Annalkona, I don't believe it is pear based on the fruit that I saw and the seeds that I saw. I don't have photos of those as I saw them last fall. I grew up in a very old house that had many various apple and pear trees (some of the latter which were very small and sour as you describe) and these were nothing like any of those that I had seen. The fruit that I saw in the cemetery was much more in line with what I assumed was an apricot but based on Applestar's response and what I have now looked up, more likely persimmon. I was unaware persimmons grew this far north but now I know they do! The tree has obviously been there for quite a long long time. I will pay more attention this year when I am nearby and get photos of the fruit.

smp928s
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Re: Unknown Fruit Tree Identification

Thanks to both of you for your responses.

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!potatoes!
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Re: Unknown Fruit Tree Identification

it's a gingko. the bark, tree structure and the long spurs on the twigs are all good indicators. the fruit isn't edible (in fact, it will give most people contact dermatitis), but the seeds/nuts are edible.

you may not have seen big persimmon trees, applestar? the bark on those is a very particular pattern of deep squared-off sections.

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applestar
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Re: Unknown Fruit Tree Identification

Interesting !potatoes! I hadn't considered ginkgko. Almond-shaped ( but smooth ) single seed per yellow fruit -- about size of large cherry or cherry tomato, isn't it?

I did wonder after posting because I think persimmon leaves occur in opposite pairs? But no, I haven't had the opportunity to observe a really big persimmon tree. Mine is still pretty young.... But next time I walk by the community pond, I will see if I can get closer to a persimmon growing there. 8)

Ginkgo has unusual, fan-shaped leaves -- striking yellow In fall color. I have a baby tree in the front yard.
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JONA
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Re: Unknown Fruit Tree Identification

It's a throw back to pre-historic times. One of the oldest trees known.
Only the female fruits so there must be a male one in the area too.
John

smp928s
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Re: Unknown Fruit Tree Identification

Wow. You really do learn something new everyday. Thank you. I knew there had to be a reason beyond my basic curiosity for my asking... I am highly allergic to poison ivy and from what I'm reading it's the same chemical at play!

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!potatoes!
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Re: Unknown Fruit Tree Identification

I'm a big fan, even though the fruits smell like toecheese and give you a rash, heh. I'm partial to the seeds cracked into soup. the clear gold that the leaves turn in fall is nice too.

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