Moringa95632
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What should I do? (Tree not suitable for my climate)

Okay so I ordered 12 baby Moringa trees off of ebay because I plan on growing them. However, I found out that they will not survive in temperatures lower than 35 degrees. I live in Sacramento,CA which can get colder than that during winter. The trees don't get that big, but I'm sure I couldn't keep a fully grown Moringa tree indoors with heat lamps, or could I?

If I leave them outdoors they'll probably die during winter, What should I do?

I am completely new to gardening, so please excuse my ignorance. :mrgreen:

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applestar
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Re: What should I do? (Tree not suitable for my climate)

I'm intrigued but haven't made up my mind to try growing them so I don't know much about them yet.

I heard that they are easy to root from cuttings, so probably the best way to go about it is to grow them outside and in the ground for maximum growth during the growing season, harvesting as they grow, and then take cuttings and propagate them 4-8 weeks before it gets too cold outside. (I would start practicing while you have extras to work with)

In the mean time, research what you will need to keep a small Moringa tree alive indoors during winter. Typically, you would only need to keep them alive and not necessarily thriving. Some of my tropical plants in the winter just hunker down in low to upper 60's temperature which is cold for them, needing less light and water. This is particularly the case with younger seed-grown trees which are used to growing under the shadow of mature trees. But they may need higher humidity.

Then you can harvest as much as you can from the in-ground trees before they are damaged by the cold and bring the potted ones inside when it gets too cold. Start all over again in spring once it gets warm enough.
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Allyn
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Re: What should I do? (Tree not suitable for my climate)

You said it gets colder than 35 degrees there, but for how long? I"m wondering if you'd just have to keep them from freezing through the occasional cold night or if you 'd need to protect them for long stretches.

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rainbowgardener
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Re: What should I do? (Tree not suitable for my climate)

If you bring them in for the winter, you wouldn't need heat lamps. The heat indoors would be plenty for them. And since you want them to get at least semi-dormant (hunkered down as applestar said), you wouldn't need supplemental lighting. Just put them by a window and give them some benign neglect - no more water than they absolutely need and no fertilizer. Once it is warm enough to take them back outside (you will have to harden them off gradually), you can start giving them regular water and fertilizer.
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imafan26
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Re: What should I do? (Tree not suitable for my climate)

Moringa is not a small tree and they put out very long branches. You will have to keep cutting them back if that is an option for you. It is a tropical tree, and they grow in just about every Filipino community around here. I haven't really seen a tree in its natural condition because it is always being hacked for the leaves and fruit.
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HoneyBerry
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Re: What should I do? (Tree not suitable for my climate)

Build a greenhouse.

Cover them with burlap boankers if it gets too cold. (hassle)

Try to sell them and learn from your mistake.
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Moringa95632
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Re: What should I do? (Tree not suitable for my climate)

I wouldn't mind bringing the plants indoors during winter and using lights to keep them alive. However, I was planning on putting the small little trees (I ordered 12 baby trees about 3-5 inches tall) into those large pots. I was worried about whether or not the roots will have space to grow though, especially once I bring it back outside during summer. Moringa is said to grow a lot and fast, will the roots have enough space in a large tree pot? Or will that not work?

Please let me know.

HoneyBerry
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Re: What should I do? (Tree not suitable for my climate)

That sure is a nice looking tree. I've learned that tropical plants need to be pampered in non-tropical climates so that they don't die. I have a little tree that needs pampering in way that is closer to arctic than tropical. It likes cold and wet. Sometimes the weather is too warm and dry for this plant. It does fine in the winter. But during this drought and extra warm weather that we are having, I have to pamper it on the porch where it us shaded and I water it every day. I am very busy so it us a hassle having to pamper it. But if you really love a particukar plant, it doesn't seem so bothersome. I tend to avoid tropical plants altogether because they require higher maintenance in my location, but I do find them to be very beautiful and alluring. So I understand what you are going through.

I found some good info for you that should help. Here it is:

"Now this is important! When you plan on growing your tree in a container be certain to cut the main tap root. The tap root runs deep into the soil in search of water. Before you plant that tree cut that tap root. By cutting the root you stimulate vigorous lateral but shallow root growth. This root growth is better suited for container growing. Moringa trees planted without a pruned tap root perform poorly in containers."

That is a direct quote taken from the following site, which has even more info on the subject:

https://www.bestmoringatrees.com/container-growing.html

This site also has some good info:
https://www.moringamatters.com/how-to-gr ... -tree.html

There seems to be lots of good information about this tree online. It seems to be a popular little tree. Now you've even got me interested in this tree.

Wishing you a wonderful gardening experience.
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HoneyBerry
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Re: What should I do? (Tree not suitable for my climate)

Found this great site about growing moringa trees. Scroll down to find the videos.
Some good info about growing where it gets cold.

https://www.moringatreeoflife.com/
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HoneyBerry
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Re: What should I do? (Tree not suitable for my climate)

Allyn,
I hope you find a way to keep your moringa trees. I listened to some videos about it. It is amazing. I hope to have one myself someday.
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Moringa95632
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Re: What should I do? (Tree not suitable for my climate)

Bird Lover, thank you so much for all of the helpful information.

I don't really want to build a green house just for these trees so I have decided to do the large pot method.

Hopefully the cutting the tap root method works .

HoneyBerry
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Re: What should I do? (Tree not suitable for my climate)

The videos talk about some solutions for your cold temp problem. You might be able to plant them in the ground. Listen to the videos.
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Mark Reese
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Re: What should I do? (Tree not suitable for my climate)

How did you make out with your Moringa? Great to hear you were trying to grow Moringa. It's such an incredible food. Also, since it grows so fast you could even just grow it as an annual "vegetable" and replant each year. Here is are a couple of videos from a bed I planted this year with a really high planting density. The first one is from March and the last one from December. I highly recommend eating the leaves as an amazing superfood!


Mark Reese
Webstite: https://www.ahealthyleaf.com



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