lillgardnr
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Need Tips for Growing Garlic

I've never grown garlic before, and want to add it to the things I've tried....(it being a favorite). I'm in a zone 7 and would love a little help....can anyone please :wink: tell me what the best and maybe easiest type to grow is...flavour is a must.... :P

Newt
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Hi Lilgardnr,

The garlic you choose to grow depends on if you want to store it for a long time, if you plan to roast it and if you like strong flavor. Elephant garlic has larger cloves and tends to be considered best for roasting. Hardneck varieties are supposed to have the best flavor and store longer then softneck. You might want to read about the different types of garlic here.
https://thegarlicstore.com/index.cgi/GROUND.html

Garlic does best in an organic rich soil so add lots of compost to the bed and fertilize in the spring.

Maybe others will be along with their favorites.
Newt

lillgardnr
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thanks for the help,... :D

Newt
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You are very welcome! I forgot to mention there is a link to click on at that site at the top for 'how to grow', but you probably already saw that.

Newt

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lillgardnr,

I have been growing garlic for years and I am a friendly competition with my brother to see who can get the largest bulbs. Here are a few things that I have learned.

Garlic is photo-periodic, which means that it relies on day length to induce flowering and bulb formation. For this reason I don’t usually recommend planting garlic from the supermarket, it will not do as well as a variety that is acclimated to your area. But since you are in California, and most commercial garlic comes from California you are in a different position than most of us.

Plant in rich and loose soil. Since garlic can be a heavy feeder some sort of organic matter such as compost or manure makes a big difference. The idea is to produce a nice fat stalk, which in turn will provide a larger bulb. Loose soil in addition to being better for the plant itself also allows the bulb to expand with less resistance. I have had good results in a raised bed, which makes sense because garlic is planted in the summer or early fall and cannot be disturbed the following spring and therefore should not be part of your main garden.

Garlic must be dug and divided each year to maintain good bulb size. Planting your cloves earlier in the season aids in encouraging healthy well-established plants before winter sets in. This in turn means a better plant the next spring and a larger bulb later. In nature the bulb remains in the ground permanently, that should tell you something.

Some varieties produce a “flower stalkâ€
Last edited by Gnome on Sun Mar 30, 2008 1:00 am, edited 4 times in total.

Newt
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Wow, Norm. That was great!!! :!: :mrgreen: :!:

Newt

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Newt,

Thanks, here is picture of what is possible with good cultural practices. I'm embarrassed to say that these are my younger brothers and not mine, the student has surpassed the teacher. A father-in-law with cows, and therefore cow manure, has really helped his crop.

[url=https://img205.imageshack.us/my.php?image=buzzgarlictr7.jpg][img]https://img205.imageshack.us/img205/1223/buzzgarlictr7.th.jpg[/img][/url]

Norm

Newt
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Norm, looks like you need to make friends with those cows!

Newt

lillgardnr
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wow....now that what i call helpful... thanks so much for the help....I'm itching to get started :D
[img][img]https://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t285/nabes1/garlicbin.jpg[/img]
i was thinking of using this as my raised bed.....do you see any potential problems with that idea?

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Newt wrote:Wow, Norm. That was great!!! :!: :mrgreen: :!:

Newt
Yeah! Thanks to both of you!
My garlic (1st time garlic, 1st time gardener, and indoors under fluorescents)
is in rock-hard soil and I'm not even sure which is garlic and which is onions
anymore, from the stalks that have developed. (But at least I can still tell which is the chives;-/

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lillgardnr,

You are welcome, (to muddie as well) I hope it helps you get a good harvest.

A raised bed is not a necessity but it helps. The important thing is to keep the garlic separate from the main garden so as not to disturb the stalks in the spring. This is particularly important if you till your space. If you work your soil by hand it is not really an issue in that regard.

The wash tub you picture is deeper than anything I have ever used and will require a larger volume of soil, but I see no reason it would not work. I did grow a few in a pot on a lark one time. A few things to keep in mind is that drainage holes will be required. Propping the tub up on bricks or something else will help with the drainage.

You are getting off to a late start at least in my area, perhaps your climate is milder. Remember you are planting this year for next summers harvest so the sooner you get them in the better.

muddie46,

I have never heard of anyone growing garlic inside. As I mentioned above garlic, at least the variety I am familiar with, requires the trigger of day-length to induce bulb formation. There may also be issues with the lack of a cold rest period. This is something I am unsure about as it has never been an issue with me. If it does not work out try again next year outside.

Norm

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