maddie99
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Jul 07, 2015 4:40 pm

Tomatoes are Dying

Hi! I am new to this site so I'm sorry if I haven't done this correctly. I'm 15 years old and I am pretty new to gardening. I live in Maryland. One of my tomato plants got brown/yellow spots on some of its leaves a while ago and now it is nearly dead. There are no healthy leaves left. It has a lot of tomatoes on it still, but many of them are rotting, even when they are green. Now, I'm finding the same spots on the leaves of all my other tomato plants. It has been raining an unusually large amount lately. I attached some pictures. Can anyone help me figure out what this is and what to do about it? Thanks!
Attachments
image1 (5).JPG
image1 (4).JPG
image1 (3).JPG
image1 (2).JPG
This is a tomato from the first plant that got sick.
This is a tomato from the first plant that got sick.
This is the first plant that got "sick."
This is the first plant that got "sick."

User avatar
GardeningCook
Greener Thumb
Posts: 787
Joined: Thu Apr 30, 2015 12:35 am
Location: Upper Piedmont area of Virginia, Zone 7a

Re: Tomatoes are Dying

That's definitely a "blight" problem, & while I don't want to be a Debbie Downer, at this stage there really is nothing you can do apart from planting your tomatoes in a different area next year.

Don't let this discourage you from gardening. Early & Late Tomato Blights are the bane of gardeners everywhere.
My body is a temple. Unfortunately, it's a fixer-upper.

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27809
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Re: Tomatoes are Dying

Yes, that plant is infected pretty seriously.

To truly assess the situation, be ruthless about cutting off and bagging ALL affected fruits and leaves. The bagged material should be thrown out in the trash. Then show us pictures of what the plants look like with only the healthy foliage, floral trusses and fruit trusses.

Be sure to disinfect the tool before cutting into healthy parts of the plant -- some people recommend a bucket of water with bleach added (I'm sorry I'm not sure of the correct amount) but I just use rubbing alcohol in a travel atomizer to spray both sides of the pruning shears.

If there are lesions -- discolored streaks -- running up the stem, the plant is pretty much toast and you will want to dig up, bag and throw away quickly so it won't spread to other plants.

Fruits that are apparently unaffected should be OK to eat but they won't keep long. If blushed but not fully ripe, I would wash thoroughly with vegetable wash or (I use Dr.Bronner's Peppermint liquid soap) dry and then keep elevated on the kitchen table or counter -- I use cookie cooling rack lined with tea towel. Hopefully they will ripen before anything happens to them, but sometimes the fungal infection has already spread to the interior of the fruit..

There are recipes for using green fruits -- I don't like hard green fruits but ones that have color break or lightly blushed -- softer green color before blushing -- are good as fried green tomatoes.
Learning never ends because we can share what we've learned. And in sharing our collective experiences, we gain deeper understanding of what we learned.

jennacheckley
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Jul 01, 2015 1:08 am

Re: Tomatoes are Dying

What time of year are you planting?

The trellis looks fine I'm thinking theres either a pest problem or the soil isn't rich in nutrients enough.

For some extra tips on growing tomatoes:

https://www.gardenaware.com/10-expert-ti ... s-indoors/

imafan26
Mod
Posts: 11275
Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2013 1:32 pm
Location: hawaii, zone 12a 587 ft elev.

Re: Tomatoes are Dying

When it rains a lot there isn't much you can do. Tomatoes are prone to fungal and bacterial blights. If you can get ahead of them by spraying with copper sulfate when the weather is wet and humid before you start seeing white powder on the leaves or spots, you can hold them off for a while. Sometimes you just have to learn when the plants are too far gone and then you get rid of them before the spores spread and spoil next year's crop.

Tomatoes are perennial in the tropics but the reality is that they are always killed by disease.

For someone your age you did a really good job.
Happy gardening in Hawaii. Gardens are where people grow.

PaulF
Greener Thumb
Posts: 787
Joined: Tue Nov 09, 2010 10:34 pm
Location: Brownville, Ne

Re: Tomatoes are Dying

I agree with all the statements. For next year be sure to clean up the garden space of all debris (leaves, stems, fruit, etc.). Since most tomato diseases tend to be soil borne, blight is one of those, avoid soil being splashed onto the plants by having a good mulching program. Mulch also keeps the plant cooler and retains water so less watering is necessary. I use newspaper as a base and then put a 6-8 inch layer of straw. There are lots of choices for mulch, so that would be a good research project this winter.

Avoid overhead watering, water the soil at the base of the plant. Rain is an overhead waterer and that is pretty difficult method to control. That is where the mulch will help keep the soil from splashing up on the leaves. It is also difficult for many to move tomatoes to another area if the garden space is limited. A good sanitation program will help out a lot.

Some say choose disease resistant varieties, but that only puts off the inevitable for a few days or maybe weeks. No tomato variety is immune to disease, so choose the varieties you want and practice the best methods of avoidance: no overhead watering, sanitation, a good mulching program, making sure there is airflow at the base of the plant by staking or caging and using a spray if absolutely necessary to save a plant.

Good luck and good gardening.
Paul F

maddie99
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Jul 07, 2015 4:40 pm

Re: Tomatoes are Dying

Thanks a ton for all the replies! I will definitely try these suggestions for next year.

Return to “TOMATO FORUM”