usalabs
Newly Registered
Posts: 9
Joined: Thu May 14, 2015 6:43 pm
Location: SE Arizona, MID ALTITUDE DESERT (Elevation 2,000-4,000 feet) Zone 4

Unknown young tree bearing fruits.

For the last 2 years this (unknown) tree has not grew any fruits but his year, it's smothered in em, I tried looking up the fruit using a berry identification chart, but they look like mulberries, but I can't seem to find a tree that looks the same as mine.

Attached are 2 images of the tree, 1 is the fruit and the are is the tree.

Could someone identify this tree and its fruit, as I don't want any kids picking the berries and getting sick.
20150514_110027.jpg
20150514_105956.jpg
Click the images twice to zoom in.

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27919
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Re: Unknown young tree bearing fruits.

They look like mulberries to me, too.
Learning never ends because we can share what we've learned. And in sharing our collective experiences, we gain deeper understanding of what we learned.

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27919
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Re: Unknown young tree bearing fruits.

I remembered a previous discussion about mulberry tree in which Rainbowgardener posted links with photos of leaves and berries:
Subject: What is the name of this tree?
rainbowgardener wrote:It is definitely some kind of mulberry. Mulberry is one of the few trees to have different leaf shapes like that.

This is leaf shapes of the red mulberry:

Image
https://www.sfrc.ufl.edu/extension/4h/tr ... ves_lg.jpg

What you showed didn't look like typical mulberry berries, which usually look like somewhat elongated raspberries:

Image
https://assets.inhabitat.com/wp-content/ ... lberry.jpg

However, you can see in the picture, like the right center berry, the berries do tend to open up more if they are getting over ripe. If you have one berry, you probably have lots more. Can you post a couple more pictures of different ones, clusters?

I only know of red, black and white mulberries, which are all similarly shaped.
Learning never ends because we can share what we've learned. And in sharing our collective experiences, we gain deeper understanding of what we learned.

User avatar
GardeningCook
Greener Thumb
Posts: 787
Joined: Thu Apr 30, 2015 12:35 am
Location: Upper Piedmont area of Virginia, Zone 7a

Re: Unknown young tree bearing fruits.

usalabs wrote:For the last 2 years this (unknown) tree has not grew any fruits but his year, it's smothered in em, I tried looking up the fruit using a berry identification chart, but they look like mulberries, but I can't seem to find a tree that looks the same as mine.

Attached are 2 images of the tree, 1 is the fruit and the are is the tree.

Could someone identify this tree and its fruit, as I don't want any kids picking the berries and getting sick.
20150514_110027.jpg
20150514_105956.jpg
Click the images twice to zoom in.
No worries. You have Mulberries there. Some trees bear short stubby fruit; others bear more elongated fruit. Been there, done that. Whether it has to do with environmental conditions or the tree itself - you do have a Mulberry tree there.
My body is a temple. Unfortunately, it's a fixer-upper.

usalabs
Newly Registered
Posts: 9
Joined: Thu May 14, 2015 6:43 pm
Location: SE Arizona, MID ALTITUDE DESERT (Elevation 2,000-4,000 feet) Zone 4

Re: Unknown young tree bearing fruits.

I'll get another cluster pic done later today.

I want to make absolutely sure they are mulberries, and edible, before allowing my grandkids to eat them, or even my wife making a pie from them, but from images I've seen of mulberry trees, this tree looks nothing like them, my neighbor across the street has one and it's huge, it looks like an opened umbrella, with a thick trunk

I'm very dubious when it comes to wild plants, if I didn't plant it, then I don't eat it lol, unless I'm 100% sure that the fruits, roots, leaves, etc etc are 100% edible.

Is there a relative of the mulberry that bare a fruit that is similar to the edible mulberry but is poisonous? Like the deadly nightshade has the same flower as the potato, because they are of the same family, and obviously, one is deadly.

Personally, I think it should be mandatory for all schools to have lessons in identifying what is edible and what isn't, in the wild, especially when living in parts of the word where there is a mixture of deadly and edible plants which would save time in planting what is already available.

I live in SE Arizona, out in the desert, where wild edible plants thrive, but not knowing which ones are edible and which ones will kill, I just leave them alone, but I would like to know, though, so that I don't go out an purposely buy plants that otherwise are growing wild.
Last edited by usalabs on Fri May 15, 2015 4:16 am, edited 1 time in total.

imafan26
Mod
Posts: 11365
Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2013 1:32 pm
Location: hawaii, zone 12a 587 ft elev.

Re: Unknown young tree bearing fruits.

if you have a university extension office, you can take a leaf, a flower , and a fruit to them and they can identify it for you.
Happy gardening in Hawaii. Gardens are where people grow.

usalabs
Newly Registered
Posts: 9
Joined: Thu May 14, 2015 6:43 pm
Location: SE Arizona, MID ALTITUDE DESERT (Elevation 2,000-4,000 feet) Zone 4

Re: Unknown young tree bearing fruits.

Ok, here's another pic of the fruit a bit more closer.
20150515_112930.jpg
Mulberry or other?

User avatar
GardeningCook
Greener Thumb
Posts: 787
Joined: Thu Apr 30, 2015 12:35 am
Location: Upper Piedmont area of Virginia, Zone 7a

Re: Unknown young tree bearing fruits.

Definitely a mulberry. Since there are both wild & cultivated varieties that happily cross, both leaf & berry shapes can vary. No worries. Enjoy them. :)

Here are some pics to show you how different Mulberries can look:

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=Mulberry+leaf ... ages&iax=1
My body is a temple. Unfortunately, it's a fixer-upper.

usalabs
Newly Registered
Posts: 9
Joined: Thu May 14, 2015 6:43 pm
Location: SE Arizona, MID ALTITUDE DESERT (Elevation 2,000-4,000 feet) Zone 4

Re: Unknown young tree bearing fruits.

GardeningCook wrote:Definitely a mulberry. Since there are both wild & cultivated varieties that happily cross, both leaf & berry shapes can vary. No worries. Enjoy them. :)

Here are some pics to show you how different Mulberries can look:

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=Mulberry+leaf ... ages&iax=1
Thanks, I'll definitely enjoy them in a pie, it's a pity they're not as big as blackberries.

Return to “Plant Identification”