Monkeygurl
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Posts: 5
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2014 5:25 pm

Indoor Tropical Plant HELP!

Heya,

So basically I went to Hawaii a couple of weeks ago. They have the most amazing fragrant plants out there I'm from Michigan so nothing (that I know of) that grows in Hawaii will probably survive here.

So I bought a couple of plants/stems/seeds and I am attempting to plant them indoors (I HOPE). Problem is I have never done any indoor planting. Normally I just buy plants, dig a whole, place some general topsoil/fertilizer, plant goes into hole, cover with topsoil voila done! So clearly I need help now!! I'm also panicking because it's been over a week since I've been back so I worry that the plants may die. Which is why I'm posting when I haven't done enough research myself.

I bought:
-1 Stephanotis Floribunda (Madagascar Jasmine - vine) comes in a SUPER small pot
-5 Plumeria (1 in small pot and 4 stems (so no roots on 4 of them)) tree.. yeah I know I have to prune
-1 Cordyline terminalis (Ti Leaf Plant) in small pot
-1 Cattley Orchid in small pot
-Bird of paradise (Strelitzia Reginae) 4 seeds
-Wood Rose (Operculina Ruberosa) 4 seeds (vine)

I understand that you need a pot with holes for drainage. I just learned that I should probably get SMALL pots because with a larger pot it develops it's root system which may not be what I want????

I can look into sunlight requirements for each ¦ watering requirements are minimal (more like water them well, then let them dry, repeat). What I don't understand is how big a pot do I plant these in? Soil mixes for each, fertilizers basically setting it up. I'm not familiar with tropical plants and from my understanding they are very fragile.

Any advice is appreciated!!

Thanks

valley
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Location: ranches in sierra nevada mountains California & Navada high desert

Re: Indoor Tropical Plant HELP!

Hi, This might help with the Jasmine. I found this on: Pacific Coast Plants. What kind of temperature are you dealing with there in Michigan?

Richard


How to Grow and Care for Madagascar Jasmine


Madagascar Jasmine or Wax flower is a heavily perfumed climber. The waxen flowers appear in groups or 'pips' along the stems.
Madagascar Jasmine or Wax flower is a heavily perfumed climber. The waxen flowers appear in groups or 'pips' along the stems.


The name Stephanotis comes from the Greek words stephanos, a crown and otis, an ear, probably referring to the way the flowers are formed in bunches. There are some fifteen known species of this evergreen climber, but only one species is grown as a house plant to any extent. This is Stephanotis floribunda, popularly known as Madagascar Jasmine or wax flower, which was introduced from Madagascar in 1839.

The strongly scented white, waxy flowers, much used in wedding bouquets, corsages and button-holes, are produced in clusters in spring, and may continue through summer, on an evergreen climbing shrub, which can grow to perhaps 15 ft (4.5 m). Although the stems get very long, it can be kept under control and encouraged to flower by careful pruning and training the leading growths around a hoop of wire or cane.

Madagascar Jasmine is not the easiest of plants to grow in the house, but if kept in a window where it can receive good light, it will flower well. It is really better suited to a greenhouse or conservatory, where it looks its best when trailing along a rafter with the clusters of lovely white flowers hanging down delicately.

When buying, look for good, healthy, green foliage. The plant should have two or three clusters of flower buds, preferably with one or two flowers just opening. Look out for and reject plants that have dropped some of their flower buds.

How to take stem tip cuttings

1. Take cuttings in spring using stems that grew the year before. Prepare pot or propagator with equal parts peat moss and coarse sand or perlite. 2. Choose shoot or stem tip with 2 pairs of healthy leaves and a growing point. Cut off below 2nd pair
1. Take cuttings in spring using stems that grew the year before. Prepare pot or propagator with equal parts peat moss and coarse sand or perlite. 2. Choose shoot or stem tip with 2 pairs of healthy leaves and a growing point. Cut off below 2nd pair
3. Prepare cuttings by trimming off stem just below a leaf.
3. Prepare cuttings by trimming off stem just below a leaf.
4. Remove the lowest pair of leaves.
4. Remove the lowest pair of leaves.
5. Dip the cut surface in hormone rooting powder. Shake of the excess.
5. Dip the cut surface in hormone rooting powder. Shake of the excess.
6. Make small holes in potting mixture around edge with stick or pencil.
6. Make small holes in potting mixture around edge with stick or pencil.
7. Insert cutting so that end of stem is at bottom of hole and leaves are level with potting mixture.
7. Insert cutting so that end of stem is at bottom of hole and leaves are level with potting mixture.
8. Water and cover with plastic bag supported by wire. Remove cover for 5 minutes a day and never let potting mixture dry out. Keep at 70 degrees F (21 degrees C). Remove after 21 days. When cuttings are growing well, re-pot in normal mixture.
8. Water and cover with plastic bag supported by wire. Remove cover for 5 minutes a day and never let potting mixture dry out. Keep at 70 degrees F (21 degrees C). Remove after 21 days. When cuttings are growing well, re-pot in normal mixture.
Stephanotis floribunda.
Stephanotis floribunda.
Proper care guide

Atmosphere: Madagascar Jasmine appreciate a ventilated, but not draughty, position free from gas fumes.

Cleaning: Wipe the leaves occasionally with a damp cloth. Never use leaf shine.

Feeding: Apply standard liquid fertilizer every 14 days during spring and summer when the plant is growing and flowering.

Humidity: They should be sprayed every day with lime-free, tepid water in summer, but do not spray the flowers. Stand the pot on damp pebbles to provide constant humidity.

Light: Provide plenty of bright light, but keep the plants out of direct sunlight, which will damage the foliage.

Potting and re-potting: Potting should be done in late winter, using a soil-based potting mixture. Move plants into pots one size larger in early spring. After the first 2 years, re-pot after pruning (see below) every spring. Mature plants can generally be accommodated in 5-6 in (12-15 cm) pots, but move healthy plants that continue to grow into 8-9 in (20-23 cm) pots. If the plant gets too old or difficult to move, just replace the top soil in the pot or tub with fresh potting mixture.

Propagation: Take 3-4 in (8-10 cm) long tip cuttings from non-flowering lateral shoots in spring or early summer. Dip the cut ends in hormone rooting powder, and plant each cutting in a 3 in (7.5 cm) pot containing equal parts of peat moss and coarse sand or perlite. Enclose the potted plant in a plastic bag or heated propagating case and keep it at a temperature of around 65° F (18° C) in bright light without direct sunlight.

Given just enough water to keep the potting mixture moist, rooting should occur in 8-10 weeks. When the new roots are well developed, move the cuttings into the normal soil-based potting mixture used for mature plants. (See step-by-step photos at right).

Pruning: Cut back any straggly leading growths by about half if necessary, and cut the side shoots back to spurs of 3 in (7.5 cm) or so. Cut out all weak shoots. This is best done in spring.

Temperature: The ideal summer temperature for stephanotises is 65° - 70° F (18° - 21° C), but they also do well in warmer rooms, given high humidity (see above). The maximum summer temperature is 80° F (27° C). In winter, keep them slightly cooler at 55° F (18° C).

Watering: In summer, water plentifully as often as necessary to keep the potting mixture thoroughly moist. In winter, water sparingly once a week. Use lime-free, tepid water when possible.

As an outdoor plant

In frost-free climates, the Stephanotis floribunda can be grown against a sunny wall or over an arbor or pergola.

What goes wrong

Problem
Cause
Treatment
Young leaves turn yellow
Chlorosis from lime in the water
Water once with a solution of sequestered iron and then water only with lime-free water
Flower buds shrivel
Too dry
Water more often
Flower buds drop
Plant has been moved about or the pot turned
Leave it alone
Leaves turn yellow
Too dark
Move plant to lighter place
Brown scaly insects on stems and under leaves
Scale insects
To prevent all these, spray monthly with malathion. Scale and mealy bug can also be
Leaves turn slightly yellow and have webs underneath
Red spider mite
removed individually with a swab dipped in methylated spirits. The plant will be more
White, woolly patches on stems and leaves
Mealy bug
resistant to insect attack if it rests in winter at 55 degrees F (18 degrees C)

catgrass
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Posts: 532
Joined: Thu Jun 19, 2014 6:56 pm
Location: Southwest Louisiana

Re: Indoor Tropical Plant HELP!

Wow, you've bought some real tropical plants for living in Michigan! The Ti will grow in a pot, but needs a good amount of sun to get the pink tinged leaves. The plumeria is extremely frost sensitive-anything below 45-50 degrees will stress it badly. Needs full sun to bloom, and is an extremely fast grower. The sticks can be just stuck in moist soil and left alone until they start putting on leaves. I'd start them in at least a 10 inch pot. All pots should have drainage holes, and as much sun as you can give them. My plumerias are in tubs about the size of half whiskey barrels, and they make large trees and are pretty much bug free. Good luck with them.
zone 9 Southwest La.

tomc
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Location: SE-OH USA Zone 6-A

Re: Indoor Tropical Plant HELP!

Michigan runs something like Zone 3 in the youpper, to Zone 5 at the hem of the mitten.

For a tender (tropical) plant it'll need a heated greenhouse and some supplimental light from solstice to spring equinox.

All should be able to go out of doors June 1st to Labor day. Um, and will probably welcome a direct access to sunlight, then.

If you go the small pot-route you probably want to look at bonsai or cactus soil.
Think like a tree
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Monkeygurl
Newly Registered
Posts: 5
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2014 5:25 pm

Re: Indoor Tropical Plant HELP!

Sorry wrong forum to post at
Last edited by Monkeygurl on Tue Aug 26, 2014 3:01 am, edited 1 time in total.

imafan26
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Posts: 11360
Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2013 1:32 pm
Location: hawaii, zone 12a 587 ft elev.

Re: Indoor Tropical Plant HELP!

The catleya is not an outdoor plant. It likes about 50% shade. It can be grown indoors under light or near a bright window that has a sheer curtain. If you have a light meter you want to get about 5000 lumens. Orchids like high humidity and should be misted and if you keep the plant on a pebble tray it will help with the humidity. Orchids like to be underpotted but should be repotted before the media breaks down or if the roots start to rot. When you water the orchid, put it in a sink and water it thoroughly. It helps to flush out the salts. If you have healthy roots they should be white with a green tip when they are growing. When you water the roots will sometimes turn green. You won't need to water again until the roots get white again. If the roots are white and firm they are healthy and if the media has pieces that are not soft or look like there is a lot of dirt in the media, you are ok. Orchids should be repotted about every two years in orchid media not dirt. There are videos on youtube about orchid repotting. Better yet join an orchid club, you will learn how to take care of the plants and you can get help from other club members when it comes time to repot.
Happy gardening in Hawaii. Gardens are where people grow.

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