sassy21
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Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2007 1:31 pm
Location: Northern Kentucky

mimossa help

I have about ten 1-3 inch mimossa (sp?) trees that have germinated in a 10 inch pot that was under my large tree last summer. I would lilke to transplant them individually into something larger. My two main concerns are the proper way to do this and when is the best time. They are kind of close together in this pot. Also, I had one that was about 8 inches old that I raised from seed and heard on the talk radio show that I needed to put it out in the winter in it's pot. I followed all of the directions and this spring it is dead. Last question..... how big/old do they have to be before I can plant them directly outside for their best chance of survival? Thanks in advance for you help.

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Grey
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Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2005 12:42 am
Location: Summerville, GA, Zone 7a

Goodness, a Mimosa should be fine with almost anything you do to it. It could be the roots got too cold in the pot over winter, and that's what killed it.

It's this tree, right?
https://www.naturehills.com/new/product/productdetails.aspx?proname=Mimosa+Tree

You can put them in the ground anytime - they are actually hard to kill (trust me I know, I've hacked at one for almost two years now trying to kill it - it wants to be IN my foundation) They are an invasive species in some parts of the country (like here!).

sassy21
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Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2007 1:31 pm
Location: Northern Kentucky

Yes, that is the tree. So planting one of these trees that is only 2 inchers tall, will make it through the winter? Also, what about the root system? Any special things I need to know about planting them in the ground? Thanks

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Grey
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Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2005 12:42 am
Location: Summerville, GA, Zone 7a

I would think it would. I know in S. IL, they are also all over the place, wild. I would think, if you are worried about it in winter, then in late fall put a bunch of hay around/over it and uncover it in the Spring. Little insulation always helps.

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