Don
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2007 11:01 pm
Location: Tennessee

Can someone help to identify these

These two shrubs were already in the yard when we moved here four years ago. In that time they have approximately doubled in size. They are about seven feet tall now and both are in partial (mostly) shade. They do not look like anything growing wild in the surrounding area. In four years we have never seen flowers on them. The one with the jagged leaf has thorns about one inch long.
Thanks for your help
Don
[url=https://img213.imageshack.us/my.php?image=flowerbedshrubui1.jpg][img]https://img213.imageshack.us/img213/6452/flowerbedshrubui1.th.jpg[/img][/url]
[url=https://img213.imageshack.us/my.php?image=leaf1mm8.jpg][img]https://img213.imageshack.us/img213/2317/leaf1mm8.th.jpg[/img][/url]
[url=https://img507.imageshack.us/my.php?image=houseshrubaf2.jpg][img]https://img507.imageshack.us/img507/7207/houseshrubaf2.th.jpg[/img][/url]
[url=https://img74.imageshack.us/my.php?image=shrubs004yz8.jpg][img]https://img74.imageshack.us/img74/2337/shrubs004yz8.th.jpg[/img][/url]

opp2
Senior Member
Posts: 137
Joined: Mon Jul 03, 2006 11:47 am
Location: Greater Toronto Area-zone 4-5

I can't get the photos to enlarge for me, however, if the leaf in the second picture goes with the third photo shrub and the other two go together I'd say the top shrub is a (paper) birch tree, and the other looks much like my amur maple...

I could be out to lunch though

Don
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2007 11:01 pm
Location: Tennessee

Can someone help to identify these

opp2, Thanks for the reply. The leaves are both pictured below the shrub it came from. I guessed the top one might be some kind of maple from the shape of the leaves, but I have never seen a maple grow in this shape.
Don

MaineDesigner
Green Thumb
Posts: 439
Joined: Thu Nov 09, 2006 4:17 pm
Location: Midcoast Maine, Zone 5b

I'm fairly certain that your top example with thorns is a hawthorn, perhaps Crataegus phaenopyrum, the Washington Hawthorn. This is a nice small tree. The ultimate size is about 25' high and close to that in spread. If you have a space for it I would try moving it either early next spring or this fall. It probably would do better with more sun.

The second example isn't ringing any immediate bells but maybe with some larger, more close up photos I could hazard a guess.

MaineDesigner
Green Thumb
Posts: 439
Joined: Thu Nov 09, 2006 4:17 pm
Location: Midcoast Maine, Zone 5b

This is little more than a semi-educated guess but your second example might be an Amelanchier, possibly Amelachier laevis. If I'm correct it is another nice small tree. Amelachiers are more shade tolerant than hawthorns. If you want to keep it you need to move it early next spring. Both hawthorns and amelachiers are members of the Rosaceae family which is somewhat prone to disease and insect problems but don't let that scare you off, they really are nice trees.

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