RABC
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GRASS TO GRAVEL

HI
I HAVE JUST RECENTLY REMOVED MY LAWN AND REPLACED IT WITH 20mm GRAVEL AND TO BE HONEST IT LOOKS DULL, THE LAWN WAS ONLY 24 SQUARE METRES SO I CANT EXACLY PUT A BIG FEATURE IN THE MIDDLE,
HAS ANYONE ANY SUGGESTIONS ie PLANTS IN THE GRAVEL OR PLANTS IN CONTAINERS , FAILING THAT IT WILL BE OUT WITH THE SHOVEL AND THERE WILL BE BAGS OF GRAVEL FOR SALE........THANKS

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Jess
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Is it sunny RABC? Why not try herbs and alpines?
Some could be in pots and some planted directly in to the gravel. You could have a main central feature of a large urn or similiar and grow something vey simple in it that could cascade down to the gravel like a prostrate Rosemary or Creeping Jenny (Lysimachia) usually sold as a bedding plant but it is completely hardy. If more shady use box, shaped and in pots, and plant more sculptural type plants but try to keep the plant varieties to a minimum (but several of the same) rather than a lot of completely different plants because it can just look very cluttered in a small space.

RABC
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Thanks for the quick responce, any suggestion of which alpines and herbs would be suitable for our wonderful climate and that would be readily available from garden centres as im looking for a quick fix you could say
..................cheers

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Jess
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Nice to talk to a fellow Brit. At least I know what weather you get up there. A bit colder than us Southern softies! :lol:

For a start what was your soil like underneath the gravel? It will make a difference as to what will survive cold wet winters if you are intending to plant directly into the ground.
What was your lowest winter temp this year? We seem to be getting warmer and wetter down here but only -3C this winter. Hardly a winter at all!
When I know the answer to those two questions I will give you a list. I take it that it is in sun best part of the day?

RABC
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Jess
Once again thanks for the quick reply being a relative newcomer to this gardening lark the soil is what i would call ok ie it crumbles it aint clay and the climate is more or less the same as you as i live on the coast and i think the temp is slightly higher than what it is inland and regarding shady or not the lawn only gets about three hours of direct sunlight as that was the reason for the removal of the lawn ie lots of moss sorry but thats about all the info i can give ( wish i put up with the moss)
.............once again advice appreciated.

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Jess
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Morning RABC. To continue...sorry got too late went to bed...

It is I think a large enough area for a small tree and without the sun forget the herbs and alpines. They need full sun to do well.

Firstly tree. For the conditions you have an Acer would be ideal. Check out some smaller growing purple leafed varieties on the web. Would look wonderful against the gravel. In the ground you could plant evergreen perennials like; Ferns, Heucheras, Tiarellas, Foxgloves, Anemones, Hellebores and hardy Geraniums. In pots try Hostas...keeps the slugs off... Shrubs that like shade are Sarcococca (sweet box), Aucuba, Box and Euonymous. In pots you could grow small Azaleas and Rhodes as they need acid soil. All of these are readily available from Nurseries and Garden Centres. Like I said before limit your choice to a lot of the same rather than 1/2 of each to stop it looking fussy.
A statue amongst all the lush foliage would finish the look off

https://ky-dan.com/images/summer2002/5260015.jpg Check this link out for an idea of how it can look. Take note of the dark leafed Acer to the right.

Whatever you decide on please post some pictures.

RABC
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Thanks for the advice Jess going to check out the garden centres see whats there.............cheers

RABC
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Jess
Sorry to be a pain but could i plant those perennials into the soil below the gravel..........cheers

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Jess
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Yes you can but I would do some in pots too just to get a variation in height. Gravel gardens can look very flat and boring.
When you decide which ones you like have a look at their form and if you think they would do well in a tall pot say flowing down or in a wide flat pot spreading out or would look better coming through the gravel then plant accordingly.
You are not a pain :lol: I do this for a living (should charge you really :wink: ) Most of the info is in my head and I just love helping people make the best of the garden they have.

You really had better post some pictures when you have done it or I may have to come up there and have a look myself!!

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