tribblegarden
Newly Registered
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 2:33 pm
Location: MD

need help to identify plant

In a wooded, shaded area of our property, I found a plant that not there in recent years. The whole plant is maybe 4 inches above the ground. The remarkable aspects are that it's a clump former, may spread by runners under the soil (not yet confimed, but the clumps have appeared in several places), and the leaves are similar in texture to an epimedium, but the stems are thicker. Also, the leaves have a burgundy heart so that it looks green heart at the center, burgundy heart, then green at the outside. They are alternate leaves on the stem. I haven't seen a bloom yet, and it may not.

Any idea what it may be?

User avatar
Grey
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1596
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2005 12:42 am
Location: Summerville, GA, Zone 7a

can you post a photo?

tribblegarden
Newly Registered
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 2:33 pm
Location: MD

No, sorry. No digital camera. Will see if I can borrow one.

The Helpful Gardener
Mod
Posts: 7493
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:17 am
Location: Colchester, CT

Need more info and the image would be a big help (sounds a little like woodland aster, and that would be native and seed spread...)

HG

opabinia51
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 4659
Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2004 9:58 pm
Location: Victoria, BC

You could take a photo with a conventional camera and have the photo scanned and placed on a disk.....

tribblegarden
Newly Registered
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 2:33 pm
Location: MD

I looked at a photo of the small woodland aster. That's not the plant. The 2-4 inch height is about right -- one mount is already about 12 inches across, and growing. Others are smaller.

The leaves aren't right. Our plants have a purple/burgundy heart pattern in the leaf -- for a 3-hearted effect (green, burgundy, green). I can't comment about flowers; none in sight as of now, but we are having rather cool weather so perhaps eventually. The leaves are soft and delicate, and alternating on the stem, which is stronger.

The closest to the pattern is a geranium, but this is not a geranium. I'll post measurements later today.

Not much of a photographer. Working on the camera. We don't have one, so it will a real project.

The Helpful Gardener
Mod
Posts: 7493
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:17 am
Location: Colchester, CT

Knotweed (Polygonum) can have that burgundy/green thing and it's common as dirt (non-native invasive)...

Here's a photo...

[url]https://plants.usda.gov/cgi_bin/topics.cgi?earl=plant_profile.cgi&symbol=POPE3[/url]

Scott
Last edited by The Helpful Gardener on Thu May 12, 2005 10:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.

tribblegarden
Newly Registered
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 2:33 pm
Location: MD

Thanks Scott. That is precisely the one. Should I rip them all out?

The Helpful Gardener
Mod
Posts: 7493
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:17 am
Location: Colchester, CT

OH YEAHHH! :twisted:

tribblegarden
Newly Registered
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 2:33 pm
Location: MD

knotweed

Well, I think we may have two varieties of knotweed. The second has longer leaves and the purple is irregular, not a heart, on the leave. It stands about 8 inches, with the leaves pointing up.

This is occurring in a wooded area, that is covered with ivy, pacasandra and periwinkle. It is moving here from the neighbor's back garden in areas where the ground cover is not as thick.

Is knotweed able to take over these groundcovers? Or will the ivy, etc. withstand the invasion?

The Helpful Gardener
Mod
Posts: 7493
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:17 am
Location: Colchester, CT

Could just be a sport or a different species. Treat the same...

Ivy? Pachysandra? Polygonum isn't your only trouble; I'd be worried about the others too! Sounds like you have an invasive stew here! :shock:

As you may have noted I'm not a huge fan of chemical solutions, but ROund-up is starting to look like a good idea...

Scott

tribblegarden
Newly Registered
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 2:33 pm
Location: MD

invasion of the green stuff

We have a hill, and the ivy, periwinkle and other groundcovers are healthy at this point. They hold the ground and that's a good thing. This is a natural area that hasn't been touched in some years, as far as I know. At least 50 years.

The knotweeds are new this year. We have a lot of trees and green, and it's like an aviary. The downside of birds (not to mention deer, fox, and other animals) is that they deposit goodies with their poop.

I am working in the upper area for the first time, and planting bulbs, shrubs and eventually some trees. Who knows what the deer will allow to bloom. Perhaps they will eat the knotweed. Otherwise, I guess I have a serious amount of weedpulling to do.

I only use roundup on poison ivy.

Cheers.

Return to “Plant Identification”