diunnj504
Newly Registered
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Dec 10, 2012 4:00 pm
Location: Northwest Georgia

Historical store/house with no garden

My boyfriend and I are moving into a rock house/ store in northwest Ga that was built in 1934. We have heard stories from neighbors who have stopped by as we were working about the man who built it 100% by hand by him self. Not only did he build a store, which was connected to the house, he also built 5 huge planters, 2 bridges, a well, and the walls where a small stream flows.
The rock store/house is already a local mark and we want to do it justice as we restore it. We have a plan for the inside but have no idea for the outside.
I have already bought a few bulbs (tulips, crocus, drumstick allium, Ostrowskianum Allium, and stripped squill) in a variety that amount to 450 bulbs. They have been in the bottom drawer of my fridge since late September.
I understand that we will be adding to the garden each year and that we have to start somewhere.
How would you suggest to start to plan a garden for an old house like this? What other plants would you suggest we plant?
I appreciate any and all ideas

(how do i post pictures)

DoubleDogFarm
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 6113
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2010 3:43 am

A warm welcome to Helpful Gardener
(how do i post pictures)
How to Post Pictures on a Forum
https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/v ... php?t=3724

Eric

cynthia_h
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 7501
Joined: Tue May 06, 2008 11:02 pm
Location: El Cerrito, CA

See whether the county (or other local/regional) historical society has any information or even photos! of the house/store in earlier times. Maybe there will be some hints of previously planted specimens. :) Sounds absolutely beautiful to me!

Cynthia H.
Sunset Zone 17, USDA Zone 9

User avatar
ElizabethB
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 2109
Joined: Sat Nov 24, 2012 5:53 am
Location: Lafayette, LA

Cynthia is on the right tract. Check with your local historical society. You may even be able to find origninal landscaping plans. Many years ago the historical society was restoring the gardens of "The Shadows" plantation in New Iberia back to the original plans. The plans called for a peach canna. They were not able to find an exact match. One of the committe members happened to drive by my Mother's home and spotted her peach cannas that she had gotten from her mother. Mom's "pass down" cannas are now on display at "The Shadows".

I digress. If you can not find specific information on your property then research other historic homes from the same era. Your historic society is a good source so are county court house records.

You may find that you have to search far and wide to find the plants you need. It can be done. In fact once you know what you need post your needs on the swap forum. You may only get bits and pieces here and there but it will be a start.

Do work in conjuction with your historic society. They can be a big help to you.

What a wonderful project!
Elizabeth - or Your Majesty

Living and growing in Lafayette, La.

When weeding, the best way to make sure you are removing a weed and not a valuable plant is to pull on it. If it comes out of the ground easily, it is a valuable plant. ~Author Unknown

User avatar
tomf
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 3234
Joined: Mon May 18, 2009 12:15 pm
Location: Oregon

The stone work sounds nice and you have a stream, I would play up the stream. Photos and a land lay out would be helpful. PS we love photos.
You are the best one to answer your own question, we may have a few ideas to add or some help. How much land are you dealing with? Do you want a lawn to play on? Do you have dogs that need a lawn or some place to run? How much are you going to water and what will be the cost of watering? How much work do you wish to put into gardening and how much money do you want to spend are a few questions you need to ask yourself.

User avatar
rainbowgardener
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 25303
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

Sounds lovely! Here are some resources to look for:

Smithsonian's Archives of American Gardens, which includes thousands of slides from the 1920s and 1930s.

www.gardenhistorysociety.org

Try the library and garden books published during the 1930s. "The Fragrant Path" by Louise Beebe Wilder came out in 1932, and was republished in 1974 under the title "The Fragrant Garden."


I think rose gardens were popular during the 1930s, as well as borders surrounding a square lawn and quite formal bedding and regimented flowers in vibrant colours.
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

User avatar
PunkRotten
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1990
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2011 12:48 am
Location: Monterey, CA.

Sounds really cool can't wait to see pics.

Return to “Landscaping”