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Royiah
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Compost fall leafs question. :?:

Ok so I have 3 big pecan trees in my back yard. Allmost all the leafs are inside the fence where my dogs are. The back yard is coverd in dog poo. Is it ok to still use the leafs in the yard? I'm allmost certin I'll get some poo mixed in even if I try not to. :?
So yes or no? :?:

DoubleDogFarm
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Yes, Just be on the look out. :wink:

Eric

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Royiah
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k thanks!

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applestar
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I think the answer will vary depending on what is your "norm" --

(This is a broad description and not meant to offend. I sincerely don't mean it in a negative way)

Some people have dogs that run around in dog poo covered yard and come inside and run around the house an jump up on furniture and put their paws on you and give them doggie kisses. And they give them treats off the eating utensils they are still using.

Then, I would think they would be less sensitive in terms of perception as well as literally/physically -- repeated exposure building increased resistance -- to doggie germs.

Same with other animals/pets like --

Some people have cats that walk all over their pillows and kitchen counters, tables, and even cutting boards.

Some people ride horses and walk/work in their manure all the time. And when it's windy and gusts of wind blow the dry "dust" from the paddocks and riding rings around... Well. :wink:

thepumpkin
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Would this also work for typical walnut leaves? I know they shouldn't be used for mulching because of the tannins, but maybe for composting should be fine.

DoubleDogFarm
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applestar wrote:I think the answer will vary depending on what is your "norm" --

(This is a broad description and not meant to offend. I sincerely don't mean it in a negative way)

Some people have dogs that run around in dog poo covered yard and come inside and run around the house an jump up on furniture and put their paws on you and give them doggie kisses. And they give them treats off the eating utensils they are still using.

Then, I would think they would be less sensitive in terms of perception as well as literally/physically -- repeated exposure building increased resistance -- to doggie germs.

Same with other animals/pets like --

Some people have cats that walk all over their pillows and kitchen counters, tables, and even cutting boards.

Some people ride horses and walk/work in their manure all the time. And when it's windy and gusts of wind blow the dry "dust" from the paddocks and riding rings around... Well. :wink:
and don't forget the people who have children that do the same. :wink:

Eric

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pumpkin: You can certainly compost walnut leaves. My impression from various sources is that the growth inibitor in walnut trees is mainly given off by the roots so things don't grow in the soil nearby. I couldn't guarantee that there is none in the leaves though.

BTW the chemical is called juglone, and it's not exactly a tannin. Tannins are a group of compounds that are found in the leaves and wood of many trees including oaks (which is why oak barrels give a tannic flavor to wine).
Tox

thepumpkin
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Thanks for the detailed answer, Tox :)
People here use to say that nothing grows under walnut leaves and last year my parsley didn't grow (in fall the seeds got naturally covered) so I was starting to believe them. I'll try to compost them now, we have a lot (4 big walnut trees at the side of our property)

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thepumpkin wrote:Would this also work for typical walnut leaves? I know they shouldn't be used for mulching because of the tannins, but maybe for composting should be fine.
[url=https://depts.washington.edu/hortlib/resources/resource_search.php?term=10]Here's[/url] a page from the U. of Washington Botanic Gardens Q&A service re. walnut leaves. The majority sentiment seems to be "better off without walnut leaves in the compost, but if you must use them, let the compost age quite well before using it."

I only wish I had a lot big enough for three pecan trees and walnut trees into the bargain! Our lot is 50'x100', and most of it is either house or pavement (the carport is at the back of the lot, so there's a driveway the entire depth of the lot).

Most of what little is left is claimed by the redwood, planted on purpose :shock: :roll: by the builder's grandchildren in 1961 (from personal conversation with one of said grandchildren in 2008, a lady then in her late 60s, maybe early 70s, to judge from appearance). I have 96 sq ft of veggies in raised beds and, in ambitious years, when I plant out by the street, can get this number up to approx. 120 sq ft. Woo-hoo!

Cynthia H.
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Royiah
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applestar wrote:I think the answer will vary depending on what is your "norm" --

(This is a broad description and not meant to offend. I sincerely don't mean it in a negative way)

Some people have dogs that run around in dog poo covered yard and come inside and run around the house an jump up on furniture and put their paws on you and give them doggie kisses. And they give them treats off the eating utensils they are still using.

Then, I would think they would be less sensitive in terms of perception as well as literally/physically -- repeated exposure building increased resistance -- to doggie germs.

Same with other animals/pets like --

Some people have cats that walk all over their pillows and kitchen counters, tables, and even cutting boards.

Some people ride horses and walk/work in their manure all the time. And when it's windy and gusts of wind blow the dry "dust" from the paddocks and riding rings around... Well. :wink:
I take no offence. :D Personally I don't let my pets in my bed,couch,kitchen. My dogs are outside pets. Closer the guard dogs really.
I was just wondering if it would be bad for my heath if I composted dog poo and grew food from it. I heard that you cant use cat poo either and that it could hurt you if you did.
Personally I wouldnt anyway but well you know you come acros that stuff sometimes.
Anyways I just wanted to use the leafs in my yard but wasnt sure about the dogs.
Actually I could be called a clean freak. I freak if I catch an animal in my kitchen or on funiture. :P

Cynthia: We used to have 5 but katrina uprooted them. All of the trees we have are 100y+. We don't get to eat any pecans though... Squirrls are so annoying! Our yard was COVERED in nut shells. But not one nut for us. :(
Oh well.

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BTW the chemical is called juglone, and it's not exactly a tannin. Tannins are a group of compounds that are found in the leaves and wood of many trees including oaks (which is why oak barrels give a tannic flavor to wine).[/quote]
We are in Florida, and surrounded by lots of Oak trees, lots of leaves! They fall into our beds, I pick them out though since I don't want mold to start growing under them. Someone had said that oak leaves are not good to use for the compost though?

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rainbowgardener
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Oak leaves are fine in the compost. They will be a little slower to break down than some, so you might need a little patience. They are slightly acidic, but not enough to bother the compost pile, if they are used in reasonable quantities. By the time the compost is finished, the pH will be balanced out.

Walnut leaves are fine in compost.

The only things I don't compost are meat and a few very poisonous plants like hemlock. And some diseased things, like tomato plants with blight.

The general rule of thumb is no more than 10% of your pile any one ingredient, like oak leaves. If you keep to that, you should be fine. If you have a ton of leaves, that may mean you have to feed them in to your compost pile a bit at a time.

I do that anyway. I collect fall leaves this time of year when they are abundant and then feed them in to my pile as my browns over the whole year.

See also https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=279204&highlight=#279204 on similar questions.
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

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ElizabethB
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There are always contradicting opinions about what to put and not to put in a compost pile. Personally I avoid cooked products, meat products and waste from carnivorous animals. My sister and brother-in-law breed quarter horses (a horse that they bred placed second in the $1,000,000 breeders cup on the 17th) . I have access to cured horse manure. I also have a couple of friends who breed rabbits. Rabbit manure can be used fresh or cured. During the summer I got a panic call from a friend. Her compost pile was infested with maggots. She had been adding dog poop and meat scraps. Makes my skin crawl to think about it.

I have a live oak - no leaves until spring but my husband mows over them and uses the bagger. There are more leaves that I can use in my compost but I usually add a bag or 2 to the mix.

Nothing hard and fast - just my opinion.

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K2Dreamer
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[quote="rainbowgardener"]Oak leaves are fine in the compost. They will be a little slower to break down than some, so you might need a little patience. They are slightly acidic, but not enough to bother the compost pile, if they are used in reasonable quantities. By the time the compost is finished, the pH will be balanced out.
We have 2 compost bins :D , 1 of them we've been putting stuff(scraps, clippings, etc) for the last 2 years, and now that it has broken down we are using that for the garden. The other bin we are putting stuff in and we will leave it till next year when it has broken down to be able to use that one for next fall. I was thinking to get a seperate "Leaf" compost bin going, where only leaves go since they take so long to break down.
We also have bamboo growing everywhere so when i cut those down and use them as stakes for my beans and tomatoes, I take off the foilage and use that as the "top" layer on my compost bins.

K2Dreamer
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I also have a couple of friends who breed rabbits. Rabbit manure can be used fresh or cured. During the summer I got a panic call from a friend. Her compost pile was infested with maggots. She had been adding dog poop and meat scraps. Makes my skin crawl to think about it.

We also have rabbits outside in their own little area. When I don't have time to clean their cage :oops: there is alot of poop, and in there are tons of maggots! Is that ok to put under our orange, grapefruit,lemon, etc trees? Thats what I've been doing.

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ElizabethB
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Maggots are gross! Maggots = flies. You need to clean up a little more often. I have 2 4'x4'x4' compost bins. I use one to toss into because I can not stir the one bin. I add a 5 gallon bucket of rabbit manure to the workig bin and work in. I also make a rabbit manure "tea" for my green patio plants. Fill a 5 gallon bucket 1/4 full with rabbit manure. Fill the remainder with water. Let it sit in the sun for a day or 2 to "stew". Stir and use on green patio plant. Also use on roses.

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When weeding, the best way to make sure you are removing a weed and not a valuable plant is to pull on it. If it comes out of the ground easily, it is a valuable plant. ~Author Unknown

rot
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Flies in the rabbit poo shoo fly shoo

..
Excess maggots/flies can be avoided by covering up their feed stock well in the compost pile or bin.

If you're insistent on composting stuff like the gift of the dogs or meat or rabbit raisons, do everyone a favor, mostly yourself, and cover. Cover well.

If there's a lot of leaves about, that will work great for covering up such things. If you want the leaves to break down faster you can 'break' them by running through a lawn mower. If you really want them to break down fast, shred them. If your blessed with a lot leaves do yourself a favor and get a leaf shredder. You can mix shredded leaves in your compost or use them as a mulch. Just keep the mulch out of the wind.

Mix your different ingredients well and everything will break down faster (faster compost) and keep the troublesome stuff covered - buried deep in the pile or bin. Relegating different ingredients to different bins doesn't help your cause any and by mixing a variety of feed stocks in your compost bin, you get a variety of nutrients for your plants coming out of your compost bin.

A happy helpful website I often use:
https://sarasota.ifas.ufl.edu/compost-info/

to sense
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