Uaught2nvme
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri May 25, 2012 3:18 pm
Location: Greenwood, Ms

Preventive Measures vs Powdery Mildew & Blight?

I have a pretty bad case of powdery mildew on my crape mrytles that I just noticed. Someone told me to get some sulfur spray. Will this mildew make its way to my garden? No signs of it yet...

Also, lots of reports of blight going on...what's the best thing I can do to help prevent any issues in my garden?

Thanks
Jen

User avatar
Gustav
Cool Member
Posts: 86
Joined: Fri May 04, 2012 4:37 pm
Location: Bronkhorstspruit

A piece of advice, treat it asap!!!

I had some on my pumpkins & within a weeks time it spread to ALL of my other veggies. It is terrible. I had that problem coz my veggies was too dense & the soil/plant was way too moist under the leaves that was ideal for mildew.

Mildew causes premature veggies & negatively effects the plant's photosynthesis & eventually kills the plant.

We have a powder that we dissolve & spray. Make sute to get the all of the plant, especially underneath the leaves.

This is what I use: https://www.klausklein.com/fungicides/368-fungicide-virikop-200-gr.html
Poke it in the ground to see if it grows?

User avatar
rainbowgardener
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 25303
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

Compost tea used as foliar spray or milk spray (dilute milk 50-50 or more dilute, let stand at room temp for a few hrs and spray) work preventatively against fungal diseases. The milk is helpful as a treatment for powdery mildew if it is not too advanced a case. Milk spray is not helpful as a treatment for blight, only prevention.
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

User avatar
sheeshshe
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1254
Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 12:17 am
Location: maine

I had a thought the other day. would using yogurt instead of milk work better in the water because of the healthy bacteria in the yogurt?
Sheila, gardening on the zone 4b/5a line.

User avatar
rainbowgardener
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 25303
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

I don't really know, but I usually do put a spoonful of yoghurt in the mix because of that. Let it stand at room temp a few hours to culture the bacteria.
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

User avatar
sheeshshe
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1254
Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 12:17 am
Location: maine

awesome! I think I will try it this year. do you know if goats milk work equally well as cows?
Sheila, gardening on the zone 4b/5a line.

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27970
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Any milk. Even powdered if you add culture. There IS some question regarding whole milk and richer cream adding too much fat/oil to the mix. I guess the plants are on a diet. :wink:

(when I use whole milk, I keep the mixture on a more dilute side)

User avatar
rainbowgardener
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 25303
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

and see https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=45820
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

mmmfloorpie
Senior Member
Posts: 107
Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2011 12:21 am
Location: Ontario Canada

I had powdery mildew really bad a couple summers ago... I learned my lesson.

Don't over crowd the garden and plant with LOTS of space inbetween.

Return to “Vegetable Gardening Forum”