Dan Felton
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Location: England (in the middle of)

Any ideas what this is? (photo link attached)

Hello,

We are trying to identify this plant which is located in a mostly shaded border with about 2 hours of early morning sunshine.


[url]https://www.flickr.com/photos/79095664@N05/7249361790/in/photostream[/url]

Your ideas would be much appreciated.

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Kisal
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It looks like buttercup to me very invefestive, especialy of lawns.
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

Dan Felton
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Joined: Tue May 22, 2012 2:34 pm
Location: England (in the middle of)

Hi Kisal,

Thanks for a prompt response. We wondered if it was but I have never known for buttercup to be quite so big - the whole thing is over 2 feet tall!

I am indeed used to the "lawn" variety of which we get very little here (Stafford, UK).

It certainly looks like buttercup but what about the size?

regards
Dan

Edit: I think I agree with you. I looked at some images and I think you're spot on with that!. I feel a bit of an idiot really but we have all been scratching our heads looking at it. It's the only thing that seems to do well in that border. Given that would you be able to suggest any similar plants of disposition and colour (sorry color!) which may do equally well. Or should I get rid of it ASAP - is it a weed? By the way we are quite new to gardening but I have been particularly bitten by the bug so I will be back with more silly questions.

Dan Felton
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Joined: Tue May 22, 2012 2:34 pm
Location: England (in the middle of)

I just realised there is a plant identification section which I could have posted this in. Sorry about that.

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rainbowgardener
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I love your new word, Kisal! :) invefestive = invasive + infestive. Just so!

There are lots of other bright cheerful yellow flowers in about that size range. One of my favorites is sundrops (aka Missouri evening primrose). It's native for me, but I don't know if you have a native version.

Other possibilities would be coreopsis, celandine woods poppy, california poppy (an annual, but freely re-seeds in the right conditions), sulfur buckwheat, sunflowers, black eyed susans ....

But I love the buttercups too and have been known to leave some, just keeping a close eye on whether they are spreading.
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WildcatNurseryman
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Trollius: Globeflower

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Kisal
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:lol: I always try to be creative, rainbow. I made that post from the ICU of the hospital, and I guess I was still a bit heavily dosed on medications. Always happy to contribute to the growth of the English language, though! ;)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

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