bartamos
Newly Registered
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2007 11:51 pm

Jacaranda Help please

Scottsdale, AZ. Large 40ft Jacaranda tree "froze" all leaves and stems. Very rare occurrence here. Must have stayed low for several hours. I can't believe it would die. 99% brown. Some green showing. Very small amounts up high. Is there any help I should give this tree? Temps here now are 65-90 deg F.

opabinia51
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 4659
Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2004 9:58 pm
Location: Victoria, BC

I would prune off the deadwood and provide a mulch for the tree roots to prevent them from freezing. Also, try to provide some shelter for the tree.

If you can find some, use shredded leaves as the mulch.

bartamos
Newly Registered
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2007 11:51 pm

thank you for your reply. However, it will not probably freeze here for another 25 years. I am asking if there is anything I should do or not do to promote recovery. I can not trim it because it is 40 feet tall and very large. I am wondering about what to give it? As far as bringing it back from a coma.

opabinia51
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 4659
Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2004 9:58 pm
Location: Victoria, BC

It sounds to me like your tree may be done however, you can mulch it in with shredded leaves and manure around the drip line of the tree.

This will help it greatly if the tree is still alive. Though, be sure to watch your tree and make sure that it is still alive.

bartamos
Newly Registered
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2007 11:51 pm

Don't think a tree that big would die from a few hours of 29 deg. I think its superficial frostbite. Hope so. Too early in spring to tell yet. What do the leaves you mentioned do for it? Anyone else have any thoughts.

opabinia51
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 4659
Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2004 9:58 pm
Location: Victoria, BC

This is a fundamental understanding when it comes to working with nature as apposed to trying to control nature. In trees, most of the nutrients that the trees mine from the soil are stored in the leaves.

When the leaves fall from the tree, they break down and add nutrients back into the soil but at a shallow level. therefore providing nutrients for the tree and surrounding plants. Maple leaves are among the highest in both Maco and Micro nutrients.

Adding a so called green like manure, coffee grounds and so on to the leaves addes further macro and micro nutrients and supplies the needed nitrogen to fuel the decompostion of the leaves such that the tree can acquire these added nutrients.

Using my recomdations, your tree will be healthier, more able to ward off any infections and handle other stresses such as cold much easier.

Not wanting to get into a discussion regarding global warming and weather extremes; I will just make the note that scientific literature states that the ocean temperature rise due to increased greenhouse gas increase forcast more extreme temperature and weather phenomena. Taking this data into concern, the more we can do to strengthen our plants the better chance they will have to combat any climate change that is the result of global warming.

bartamos
Newly Registered
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2007 11:51 pm

Is there anyone from the Southwest United States that knows about bringing back a Jacaranda? I need someone that knows about the desert and it's environment. We have very few leaves here. Leaves take a long time to deteriorate into this soil. It's composition is not farm soil. My tree froze for the first time in it's 15 year life during this "Global Warming" period.

Newt
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1868
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 2:44 am
Location: Maryland zone 7

Bartamos, the best you can do is supportive care. Having spent time in Arizona and the dry climate of Peru, adding organic matter to the soil and watering when needed is the best you can do help a frostbitten plant to recover. The idea is to remove any stressors and support the health of the tree. When it comes to freeze damage it's a wait and see situation. Many gardens, including public and botanical gardens lost many valuable plants this winter. If it's dead you can't 'bring it back'.

Newt

Return to “Trees, Shrubs, and Hedges”