johnekeane
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Tomatoes: Did I over water?

[img][url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/76528600@N02/7025102981/][img]https://farm7.staticflickr.com/6054/7025102981_b6f9fd4740.jpg[/img][/url]
[url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/76528600@N02/7025102981/]Untitled[/url] by [url=https://www.flickr.com/people/76528600@N02/]johnekeane[/url], on Flickr[/img]


A few of my Homestead variety tomatoes are looking a bit unhappy and I am wondering if overwatering could be the problem or if its possibly something else.

[img][url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/76528600@N02/7025102805/][img]https://farm7.staticflickr.com/6107/7025102805_d100a51851.jpg[/img][/url]
[url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/76528600@N02/7025102805/]Untitled[/url] by [url=https://www.flickr.com/people/76528600@N02/]johnekeane[/url], on Flickr[/img]

Any thoughts are appreciated

pow wow
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Leaf curl can be caused by several things. But over watering or cool and rainy conditions can cause it. This won't kill your plant and it will produce tomatoes.
Pests can also cause leaf curl and they will kill your plants.

johnekeane
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Location: North East Florida

Here in NE FL we have had a drenching rain and a bit of a hot cold spike it seems that may be a possible culprit.

richygarden
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FYI, this might be useful to you: (from GrowItGold)
"Leaf Roll:

During very wet seasons, tomato plants frequently show an upward rolling of the leaflets of the older leaves. At first this rolling gives the leaflet a cupped appearance. Later, the margins of the leaflets touch or overlap. The rolled leaves are firm and leathery to the touch. One half to three-fourths of the foliage may be affected. Plant growth is not noticeably checked, and a normal crop of fruit is produced. Frequently leaf roll occurs when tomato plants are pruned severely, and it is very common when unusually heavy rains cause the soil to remain moist for long periods of time.

To prevent leaf roll, keep tomato plants on well-drained, well-aerated soil, and protect them from prolonged periods of heavy rainfall if you can."


hope this helps.

johnekeane
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A Few Weeks Later

Well I still haven't figured out my problem with any certainty. The article you quoted was the one I found as well and I can't help but notice that most reference to this type of leaf curl say that the plants are not stunted in growth. my plants have been at a stand still, and my one healthy plant in the row has developed some blackening on the new growth near flowers. Here are some new photos:

You can see at the base of the plan some new growth coming from under the dirt all of these stunted plants have had side branch growth under the dirt at some point...

[url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/76528600@N02/7073429091/][img]https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7207/7073429091_06ae17909b.jpg[/img][/url]
[url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/76528600@N02/7073429091/]Untitled[/url] by [url=https://www.flickr.com/people/76528600@N02/]johnekeane[/url], on Flickr[/img]

This is the "healthy" plant
[url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/76528600@N02/6927349488/][img]https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5151/6927349488_d391007f37.jpg[/img][/url]
[url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/76528600@N02/6927349488/]Untitled[/url] by [url=https://www.flickr.com/people/76528600@N02/]johnekeane[/url], on FlickrImage

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rainbowgardener
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Your "healthy" plant isn't looking too healthy. At this point, I'm thinking they are diseased, most likely came to you diseased from the Big Box. Past seasons there's been problems with late blight being spread from the factory produced plants like that.
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johnekeane
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yeah... If I pull them up should I replant new ones in that area or should that row be quarantined for tomatoes, or anything for that matter?

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applestar
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I wouldn't put another solanacea family (tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, eggplants, etc.) there. Under same circumstances, I might rearrange the plants in the garden. Be sure to put good compost in the area to help improve soil health.

johnekeane
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Location: North East Florida

pulled them up

well there are other plant of the same family growing nearby so I pulled them up. I have other tomatoes doing fine in other places so it's better not to risk it I think. The non-stunted plant with the black stuff on it had a good root system the other plants however looked like this.
Thoughts? I planted the 3/4 of the seedling deep and felt that I did a good job pruning the lower leaves.
[url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/76528600@N02/7073676883/][img]https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7219/7073676883_96d6b95270.jpg[/img][/url]
[url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/76528600@N02/7073676883/]Untitled[/url] by [url=https://www.flickr.com/people/76528600@N02/]johnekeane[/url], on Flickr

cynthia_h
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The leaves of the last photo reminded me of septoria. (sorry, too early in the morning for me; don't have a link handy. :( )

Cynthia H.
Sunset Zone 17, USDA Zone 9



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