Cigar-smoker
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This stuff is taking over, but what is it?

No idea what either of these are...they are taking over. HELP!

[img]https://farm7.staticflickr.com/6057/7001786671_fa77b135a6_o.jpg[/img]

[img]https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7232/7001786677_af51e6c44f_o.jpg[/img]

sorry for the bad pics...cell phone.

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applestar
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

First one is Henbit or Deadnettle -- I can never tell which (they look very similar)

2nd one, if you are referring to the one with spikey seed pods that later on will dry and start shooting seeds all over (my kids LOVE them :roll: ) I believe is either called Bitter Cress or Upland Cress.

Towards the front in the same picture are clover and the creeping small mouse eared ones are Chickweed.

They are all within the lexicon of edible weeds, BTW. :wink:
I don't like Henbit/Deadnettle because they're too furry but they do have a sort of mushroomy flavor that adds a twist in a mushroomless salad, and the cress is better when younger and just barely flowering, chickweed stems are tough but those little leaves taste great in salad. I put clover flowers in a salad, but I think there's something you can do with the leaves? (... Hm can't remember. maybe tea?).

I don't always eat them, but then when I do, I remember all the ones I chucked in the compost pile or left to be mulch and wonder if I did the right thing. :lol:

The cress you do not want to leave lying around after the seed podss have developed to a certain point because they will use their last ounces of energy to complete their "pea shooters" and fling seeds all over the place even after they have been... Well not decapitated but made rootless.

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rainbowgardener
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I call the top one purple dead nettle ("dead" just means that it has no sting, unlike stinging nettle). All the things pictured are common lawn weeds. If you don't want them taking over your lawn, it helps to mow frequently so you don't let them go to seed.
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Cigar-smoker
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Thank you very much! Unfortunately, I believe the current outbreak is due to our unseasonably warm temperatures and the fact my lawn man hasn't started mowing yet....which is another story unto itself.

Great forum!

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applestar
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These are interesting indicators of the soil warming up.
Cress flowers first and even start to form seed pods by the time dead nettle begins vigorous growth and flowers, and chickweed wants be be even warmer before really starting to grow and flower.

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rainbowgardener
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Interesting. I hadn't really thought about that. I had a huge epidemic of chickweed this year, way more than usual. I didn't even think to connect that to how warm it has been, winter and early spring.
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

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soil
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don't confuse henbit with dead nettle, they are two different plants.
For all things come from earth, and all things end by becoming earth.

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applestar
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I know. I just have a mental block -- always have to look up the identifiers every spring. :roll: Haven't done that yet this spring-just-starting. :?

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