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19ashe86
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Location: wisconsin

Porthos Plant Propogation

months ago my aunt had given me a bi colored porthos... about 5-6 vines... anyway long story short all stems died but 2.. i have now planted them with some solid colored porthos plants i bought at the grocery store for 5 bucks.

i decided i needed more than 2 stems so i tried my hand at propagation

[img]https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-98sfAvA7IOY/Tb1xlrsyN-I/AAAAAAAAACY/e8uysG11NMk/s1600/April+2011+020.JPG[/img] ((this isn't my plant))

I cut off 2 leaves above the node as the 2 stems i had weren't long enough and one below like in the picture ((one of the no node cuttings was a cut off of the noded one.. if that makes sense)) .. so now i have 2 stems in a small vase filled with rain water in a west facing window next to my dwarf bi colored umbrella.

basically what i really wanna know is if my 2 above the node cuttings will root??

please and thanks :)

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Kisal
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I'm not positive that I'm correctly envisioning what you mean by "above the node" cuttings. Do you mean that you planted a node beneath the soil? If so, that should be fine. You know those little brown nubby things that appear along the stem of pothos? Those will become roots. I have had pothos stems just shrivel up, instead of rooting, but not if those little brown nubby things are in the soil, or even right on top of the soil surface. It's really pretty hard to miss with pothos. They're among the "weeds of the house plant world". Not to imply that they aren't pretty. I have several pots of it in my home. ;)

ETA: Wait! I looked at your pic again, and I got it! Duh! I think all of those cuttings will root just fine for you.

Your variegated plant (the one with the bi-colored leaves) will turn solid green if you don't give it bright enough light. Give it plenty of light and the variegations will become very noticeable. Don't put the plant in direct sun, but a spot to one side of a bright window will make it happy. Until it forms roots, however, keep it in slightly dimmer light, perhaps a few inches farther away from the bright window.

Your pothos will root easily in water, as many plants do. However, the roots that form in water are different that those that form in soil. They are more brittle than "soil roots" and break easily during the potting process. They may even die once the plant is potted up in soil. I prefer to just insert my starts in a rooting medium ... usually whatever standard potting mix I'm using at the time. Keep it moist, but not soggy, until you see new growth on the plant. That will indicate that enough roots have formed to support a new plant. At that point, begin allowing the top 1/2" to 1" of soil to dry, before you water again. Always give the plant plenty of water, so that the entire root ball is moistened. Then set the plant aside and allow all excess water to drain away. Never let plants stand in saucers that contain water.

HTH! :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

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19ashe86
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Location: wisconsin

thanks!

well the ones that i was unsure about i tossed.. luckily i went my my aunts today and cut off some long vines from hers and made cuttings of my own.

they are now in a small glass vase with rain water in the window but you suggested moving them so I think Ill do that. when they root a bit i will transplant them into the pot with the others.

Thanks so much!

linlaoboo
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just MHO when you take cuttings take a bit more stem with 2 or 3 of those bumps to ensure success more stems will support the cuttings in soil better. Also they root in water readily too. I find myself starting them in soil from spring to fall and in water during colder weather. I've stopped propagating them now since I've no more room or pots =)
ficus, maple, elm, juniper, pine

MemphisP
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I agree with linlaoboo about making the cuttings a bit longer. Sometimes a node will not turn into a root while another will. I always cut the stem leaving at least 2 nodes, then put those in a cup of water with the water covering both nodes. Try to keep them a bit warm and in bright indirect light and you should see roots forming in a couple weeks. Also I plant the cuttings a bit more along the soil line instead of poking a hole and burying the stem because i have had a few problems with the stem rotting and breaking off that way. Lay the stem across the soil and poke small holes for the roots to stick in. Then cover the stem with a small layer of soil and it should work great. I have had success sticking the stem way down in the dirt also but I prefer the other method. I love propagating pothos and giving them as gifts. They are some of the best plants in the world for purifying the air also.

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19ashe86
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no luck

this plant ended up dying and i few months ago i got a philodendron brasil which is doing much better! thanks so much for your help

apparently pothos and philodendrons are not the same lol my striped beauty is growing nicely i just moved it into a round hanging basket and cant wait to put it outside in the spring

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