studigardener
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Recycling the old planters ?!

I was just wondering what people do with all those old planters that are collected over the years from purchasing start off plants from a nursery? Are they recyclable ? Can they be reused ? Do the nursery's take them back?

It was just something i was thinking about. Recently i learned that there are plastics that cannot be recycled even if people wanted to. They are called thermosetting plastics.

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Kisal
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I don't know of any way to recycle the "trays" that come with 6 starts, which is the largest ones I buy, but some of the nurserys in my area will take the individual hard plastic pots for reuse. For all i know, though, they might just give them to other customers who need pots. I think the pots have to be 4" or larger and completely undamaged. I keep the 2" and 3" pots, and some of the 4" ones, for starting seeds. :)

I think our recycling center also might take them to give out to people looking for plant containers, kind of like they take used canning jars to sell. Maybe an ad on Freecycle or Craigslist would find new homes for them?
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

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rainbowgardener
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Not all plastics are recyclable, but many plastic planters and containers are made of recyclable plastic, just check for a recycle mark.
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Tilde
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The big box stores, Lowes and Home Depot, have signs saying "bring it back" but I haven't looked further to see if they actually recycle the containers (Given the ... tendencies of locals I'd be surprised if anyone brings them back. Too 'hard'.).
USDA Zone 10, Sunset Zone 25, 16 feet above sea level, surrounded by chem-turfers.

john gault
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Tilde wrote:The big box stores, Lowes and Home Depot, have signs saying "bring it back" but I haven't looked further to see if they actually recycle the containers (Given the ... tendencies of locals I'd be surprised if anyone brings them back. Too 'hard'.).
I haven't noticed that, but I'm going to check now that you mention it. I'm thinking they want them not for recycling, rather for reuse. I can recycle mine, but so far haven't. I just keep them, just in case and only recycle the ones that are cracked to the point of being unusable. But if a local store wants them back for reuse, I'd gladly return them.

Reuse is always better than recycling, but this brings up a question in my mind. Doesn't everyone now have access to recycling bins/stations, if not recycling service?

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Tilde
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They might have a turn-in credit with local growers ... local as in local branches of national companies ;). AFAIK, there is almost no repotting done at HD or L here.
USDA Zone 10, Sunset Zone 25, 16 feet above sea level, surrounded by chem-turfers.

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