robineire
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female dog urine

I am a dog owner and wonder if anyone knows if there is any truth in the rumour that female dog pee kills the grass, since getting a female pooch my grass lawn has developed yellow patches. If this is the case can anyone reccomend how to stop the dog going to the loo on the grass.

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Kisal
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Any dog of normal intelligence can be trained to urinate and defecate in a specified area, but it requires that the owner have the patience and willingness to train the dog. :)

Select the area where you want the dog to "go". Put the dog on a leash and take it out for a walk, even if it's only a walk around your yard. When the dog starts to walk around with it's nose to the ground, it's a sign that he/she is looking for a place to go. In my experience, the dogs always seemed to be walking with their rear legs kind of stiff, too. At any rate, observe your dog closely to learn what signs you must watch for.

When the dog starts to exhibit those signs, walk it over to the area that you want it to use as a potty area. Keep the dog there and keep it on the leash, allowing it to walk around the area until it goes. Then praise it like crazy. You can even give it a treat if you like.

I'm sure my neighbors must have thought I was nuts the way I made such a big deal of my dog going potty, but I didn't care about that. I bad to have my dog literally "go potty on command" because I took it with me when I traveled, and I did not have all day to wander around rest stops waiting for my dog to relieve itself.

Whatever you do, never scold the dog if it goes in the "wrong" place. Use praise and you will have success. This means that, until the dog is completely trained, you must stay with the dog until it "goes". You can't just open the door and let it outside. Another important point thing, though, is that you must keep the dog's bathroom area clean. Scoop up any feces every day. :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

robineire
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Location: Co Galway Ireland

thx

Thanks for the dog training tips :) my two are well trained and we have a 2 mile hike off the leash through woods here every morning come hail or shine, it was the female dog urine killing the grass that is my only problem, I have heard of folks placing plastic bottles on the lawn and things but don't know if they are old wifes tales.

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Kisal
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I've heard the stories, and seen the bottles sitting around yards, but I've never met a person who could tell me they actually had personal success with the method. I had giant breeds (Komondorok and Newfoundlands) that considered plastic bottles to be toys, so they wouldn't have helped keep my lawn green, anyway.

The urine kills the grass by overfertilizing it. Feces will do the same thing, as I've observed in my own yard, when I've missed a pile while scooping. Hosing down the spot thoroughly with water would probably solve the problem, but I found training the dogs to be more realistic. Besides, it really was nice to be able to put the dogs on their leashes at a rest stop, walk them to the pet area, say "Find a place!", and be able to get back in the car and be on my way.

My persoal opinion is that a few yellow spots on my lawn would be far less unsightly than a bunch of plastic bottles sitting around. ;)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

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Fig3825
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The plastic bottle 'method' has never been proven or bunked. Many people swear by it and many others call it utter nonsense.

This has also bred the same (true/false) about keeping cats out of gardens and, similarly, that a zip lok with water in it will repel flies.

In Argentina, you will often see plastic bottles of water sitting atop electrical meters because some believe it will lower their power bill - or at least make the meter spin slower...

I've even read people correcting people using water bottles for certain things because "they are doing it wrong"....and supplement the addition of ammonia and holes to repel dogs...paper bags to deter wasps...and so on and so on.

All I can say is... try it! :)

thanrose
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Kisal wrote: Besides, it really was nice to be able to put the dogs on their leashes at a rest stop, walk them to the pet area, say "Find a place!", and be able to get back in the car and be on my way.
Haha, My command is, "Find a spot!" Now that my only remaining dog is so geriatric and about 80% deaf, I'm still trained to say "Find a spot!" even if she won't notice. She does understand my more recently added hand signals for "Come", "Stop", "Down", and "Leave the Squirrel alone." I just haven't figured out how to say, "Go pee!" in Dog Sign Language.

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JimmyTheGlove
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1)Water down the pee right after your dog goes potty.

2)Train your pet to only go in one area(like a side yard, on the rocks, on a bush you don't like.. on you're spouse's shoe..)

3)Make sure your dog drinks lots of water Keeping them hydrated will make them pee more, but it will be more diluted and won't contain as many harmful chemicals. Add an additional teaspoon of Brewer's Yeast to your dog's daily diet

4)Sprinkle a bit of lime over the dead spots. This is said to alter the pH of the soil. Lime and dog pee cancel each other out somehow. Female dogs' urine is much more potent than that of male dogs. Females also like to stay organized by peeing in the same one or two spots over and over again.

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