parke.hk
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Wilting Tomato Plant

I have four tomato plants in my garden. It has been in the upper 80's the last three days here in SW Wisconsin. Three of the four are doing well, but one of the plants, an heirloom, has been wilted the last couple of days. It is even wilted in the morning. The other three wilt just a bit with the sun, but rebound by the next morning. The plant has five fruit on one limb that are about .5"-1" in diameter and still very green. They don't seem to have suffered any ill effects yet.

I've tried providing it with extra water the last couple of days, but it doesn't seem to help by the morning. Does anyone know if it is just the heat or could there be something else affecting the plants?

Thanks
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TZ -OH6
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What variety is the heirloom?

parke.hk
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The plant is a Black Prince. When I went to check the variety now many of the leaves looked much better. A couple of the limbs still had very wilted/dead leaves though. Maybe the additional watering had an effect today.
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TZ -OH6
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I am guessing that you might have one of the wilt diseases, Fusarium, Verticilium, or bacterial. Check to see if your hybrids have V or F resistance after the name to see if that is why they are not in trouble.

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hendi_alex
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You are not by yourself. I've lost at least a dozen plants to wilt this year as it has been very hot and humid. I over plant (in several locations) because of losing so many plants each year. I'm considering treating the soil with copper sulfate or other somewhat benign treatment to try and rid the soil of this frustrating disease.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
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Gary350
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It is normal for tomato plants too look wilted during the hottest part of the day.

Go out and look at your plants early tomorrow morning before it gets hot they should look fine.

parke.hk
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@TZ-OH6- I didn't see anything regarding being resistant to any of the wilt diseases on the info card that came with the plant.

@Hendi_alex- Is copper sulfate one of the best ways to treat the problem? I will have to look into that.

@Gary350- The plant is not better in the morning. I'm fairly certain it is not just heat at this point. It has been decently cool over the past 36 hours and no change. However, there are a couple limbs of the plant where the leaves are fine. A majority of the leaves look as though they won't be coming back.

The plant is a Black Prince, if that makes any difference. The other the plants around it are still doing well. The fruit that did set on the Black Prince is still holding on. I'm not sure if they are still growing though.
Locked in an eternal battle with slugs!
Gardening in zone 5a

TZ -OH6
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The letters after the name list the resistances i.e BetterBoy VFN is resistant to Fusarium and Verticilium wilts along with root knot nematodes. Most round red hybrids carry at least V and F resistances.

Here are some examples
https://www.tomatogrowers.com/midseason.htm

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hendi_alex
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Wilt disease and summer blight are problems for my plants every year. I've never treated the soil or plants before, but am tempted to start. Seems I read one poster who said that copper sulfate is effective but I would research for effect and safe options before taking any action.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

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applestar
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I wonder if lakngulf ever tried the microbe inoculant from mainpotatolady?
https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=206710#206710

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