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SPierce
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Lessons Learned...

Well, I'm still a newb gardener.. but I'm at least learning a bit more this year! I thought i'd post some photos of how my stuff is doing, as I'm just sort of feeling my way around like everyone else-- i've made a few bad decisions here and there, but, hey, maybe someone else can learn from my mistakes/experiences too?

Anyone else can add something in, also :D

Photos of my garden included at the bottom... as you can see, I bought a little bit too much hay. I have the pictured leftover, along with a totally other whole bale! whoops! :oops:

Thought about planting some strawberries in them, but it might be a bit too late and I don't have the room...

1. Don't bury your onions too deep. I made that mistake. I have tops, but the bulbs are REALLYYYY small.. Whoops. Going to leave them in a month or so longer to see if they do something, but going to try a fall planting at a shallower depth to see if can still manage to get some onions this year...

2. Always trellis, support, or cage the tomato plant immediately after planting. Don't go in with the attitude that you'll take care of it in a few days... now my container tomato is WAY too big for me to be able to do anything with, I'm going to have to jury rig something up for that huge plant. It's already got little green tomatoes on it.

3. Potatoes work out great in containers, BUT... for blight purposes (i've got a little bit of late blight that i've been fighting with them) i wouldn't put containers with the same type of plant next to each other, and would spread them out a bit more. Unfortunately, these are too heavy for me to move right now!

4. The blue containers are on sale at home depot for 5.97, just drill a few holes in the bottom for drainage and they make AWESOME planters, even for larger plants such as Zucchini!

5. Bugs love to eat pepper & Lima bean plants. Slugs too. Protect them as much as you can!

6. Soil temperature really does make a difference. Keep an eye out on that.

7. Keep up on weeding, i neglected my garden a bit because it was raining so much. I came out and had quite a few to pull!

8. Mushrooms are OK, they'll go away soon enough.

9. Everything will flower, both male and female, you just have to give it time! As much as I wish it otherwise, it won't grow while I'm staring at it, all day!

10. Enjoy the fresh food. It'll be the best you've ever tasted :D

11. If you have a small garden like i do, one bale of hay is enough. Really. Don't buy two- just by one. It'll give plenty.

12. Space planning. It helps. I went all hodge-podge this year, but I'm not sure if i could call it a success or not. Guess i'll have to see at the end of the year!

13. Don't freak out if you see a bug nearby. Study it, remember what it looks like, THEN wage war if it's a bug you don't want ! Not all bugs are bad...

14. if you see a sign of a disease, and it's spreading over a plant to the point where it's too much to manage, just pull that plant so it doesn't spread to others. Even if it breaks your heart to do so...

15. If a crop isn't working out, just go ahead, pull it, and try something else. It never hurts to be adventurous!

16. Plant what you'll eat, and Plant in a quantity that you can manage~ this has been my biggest mistake... i planted too many tomatoes and too many zucchini. I could have used 2 or 3 of those plant spaces for another type of plant, which i don't' really have room for.

17. Take advantage of max space, by using both in ground and container gardening. It helps to have both, i've found!

18. Bug spray (on you, not the plants!) will be your best friend. a hat helps too.

my 2 pumpkin plants:
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-8-2.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-9-2.jpg[/img]

Zucchinis in ground:
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-10-4.jpg[/img]

With the straw laid down... i've got a TON of extra.
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-24-1.jpg[/img]

Overall view, in ground:
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-18-1.jpg[/img]
I had a strawberry bed, but decided to pull them since production slowed down, and I wanted room for my pumpkin plant to sprawl.

Monster container tomato. This is the one I forgot to trellis/support. Notice how the tomato plants in the garden (same kind) are growing perfectly in sync with the cages? Well, this plant had some other ideas!
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-14-3.jpg[/img]

Container Pepper and garlic in front, Lima beans behind, climbing on the tomato cages i gave them to wrap around.
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-17-1.jpg[/img]

My one currently producing container Zucchini, the fruit there is going to be picked this weekend! :D
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-15-2.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-16-2.jpg[/img]

2 i've already picked, partly eaten with dinner
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Photo114.jpg[/img]

Container potatoes, starting to flower. One of the plants is starting to die, but i keep having to remember that, with potatoes, the dying back is OK! It means i'll end up with potatoes!
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-13-2.jpg[/img]

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gixxerific
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Not too bad of a garden. 8)

Everything you said is the truth. You are coming along quite nicely. Remember there is so so much to learn about gardening you can be a master in on year or even 10 years. I have been gardening in a small fashion for a long time, I have just recently ramped up my exploits. I feel every year like it is my first time. :wink:

Keep it up and stay tuned you will learn more than you ever thought possible.

:Edit: looking back at your pics is that powdery mildew on your zucs? If so a milk spray or Neem can help with that.

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rainbowgardener
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Gixx - look at the first zucch picture, the one right below the peppers and garlic picture. See how the silver follows all the veins? That's not powdery mildew. Lots of zucchs have silvery veination like that.


It's all looking GOOD! You've done great for a first timer SP and learned a lot of good lessons. We all keep learning all the time. Last year I made a similar post about lessons I learned from the experience, and I've been gardening more than 20 years! (I don't have time to go looking for it right now, or I would link it).
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

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SPierce
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gixxerific wrote:Not too bad of a garden. 8)

Everything you said is the truth. You are coming along quite nicely. Remember there is so so much to learn about gardening you can be a master in on year or even 10 years. I have been gardening in a small fashion for a long time, I have just recently ramped up my exploits. I feel every year like it is my first time. :wink:

Keep it up and stay tuned you will learn more than you ever thought possible.

:Edit: looking back at your pics is that powdery mildew on your zucs? If so a milk spray or Neem can help with that.
Thank you! :D I'm so ecstatic. I've eaten things from my garden for the first time last night- so excited! I know I have a long way to go, and learn, but at least I'm headed in the right direction! Going to even try for a fall/winter garden this year if i can manage it.

Re: the coloring on the zuccs, i was freaking out for a while too, especially since I saw 2 cucumber beetles hanging around, and some potato beetles on the potatoes next to them, but it seems to be doing okay and it's on all the leaves, so I decided to leave it be. So far so good!
rainbowgardener wrote:Gixx - look at the first zucch picture, the one right below the peppers and garlic picture. See how the silver follows all the veins? That's not powdery mildew. Lots of zucchs have silvery veination like that.


It's all looking GOOD! You've done great for a first timer SP and learned a lot of good lessons. We all keep learning all the time. Last year I made a similar post about lessons I learned from the experience, and I've been gardening more than 20 years! (I don't have time to go looking for it right now, or I would link it).
Thank you so much, and thanks also for the FYI on the silver. I wasn't sure, but it seemed healthy enough so I left it. Now i know! If you feel like looking for the link to the thread, still, i'd love to read. I've got a long way to go still before I learn some of the stuff you most likely already know :D

mmmfloorpie
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New here.

A few things I learned last summer:

1) Habaneros are way to hot to eat! I planted one because I like peppers/spicy foods. The first one I tried eating made everyone in my house's eyes water. They were on opposite sides of the house too! For me cutting it, I couldn't stay in the room after the first slice. The one plant I planted must have yielded close to 100 peppers (not exaggerating either) I threw probably all but 90 in the compost bin!

2) If you are planting next to a large barrier (the side of my house in my case) be very cognizant of plant spacing! If you plant too closely (like I did) you will be fighting off powdery mildew all summer (and inevitably losing).

3) Plants love water from rain barrels! I truly believe tap water doesn't come close.

4) Eventho those metal tomato cages look newbish, they are so much easier than staking!

And lastly:

5) Why didn't I make my garden a lot bigger!!??

dearmad
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"Look noobish?" haha... never even thought about looks in my veggie garden. I just wanted veggies.

gardenbean
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Looks like you got a nice garden going there. I'm a newbie too. Here's a few things I've learned so far that we could include on the learning list.

Allow enough room in your garden so you are able to turn and move about while you are weeding, etc. I've neglected to do that and am now paying for that. :oops:

When planting really small seeds like lettuce and carrots do it on a day when it isn't windy. Otherwise those darn seeds end up in places where you didn't want to be. :shock:

When applying fish fertiziler, realize that the smell can attract your dog to the those plants you have treated. Lost a couple of those plants.... :evil:

Grow 6 different types of radishes and find out the no in the family likes them :?

These are just a few things that I have come to learn as I garden.
Learning as I go and surprising myself when it all comes together......

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gixxerific
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My lesson that I have learned many years now.

Try to find a way in my moderate sized garden to plant things, mainly tomatoes, so that when they get crazy I can actually get to them. :oops: :lol: 8)

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jal_ut
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I'm just sort of feeling my way around like everyone else-- i've made a few bad decisions here and there, but, hey, maybe someone else can learn from my mistakes/experiences too?
You are doing great!

I am grinning because I have been gardening for a long time, and I still mess up.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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SPierce
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jal_ut wrote:
I'm just sort of feeling my way around like everyone else-- i've made a few bad decisions here and there, but, hey, maybe someone else can learn from my mistakes/experiences too?
You are doing great!

I am grinning because I have been gardening for a long time, and I still mess up.
THank you :D

And a new lesson learned: Never go out to look at the plants in the middle of the day. I freak out because they all wilt from the heat.

And... keep a closer eye on the plants, and underneath the leaves. I don't know when it happened, but something took over my potato plants and I probably lost them to a weird 1/8th of an inch orange and black caterpillar :/

vermontkingdom
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Your zucchini look great. In almost 50 years of gardening this is the latest I've had summer squash/zuccchini. Not sure what's going on but I've had lots of male flowers but no females for several weeks. We're all newbies at gardening. I think when they coined the term "life long learners" they had gardeners in mind.

Your potato caterpillars are probably Colorado potato beetle larvae. They are incredibly voracious so you need to constantly look on the underside of potato leaves for the eggs. Darn things go from egg to adult in 21 days so they can really decimate a crop in short order.

BTW, your earlier note about the potatoes having late blight was more likely early blight. Late blight wipes out your plants, potato and tomato, within a day or two. It's really the nastiest of all potato/tomato diseases.

Happy gardening.
"Good gardeners do not have green thumbs. They have brown knees, soiled hands and big hearts."

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SPierce
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vermontkingdom wrote:Your zucchini look great. In almost 50 years of gardening this is the latest I've had summer squash/zuccchini. Not sure what's going on but I've had lots of male flowers but no females for several weeks. We're all newbies at gardening. I think when they coined the term "life long learners" they had gardeners in mind.

Your potato caterpillars are probably Colorado potato beetle larvae. They are incredibly voracious so you need to constantly look on the underside of potato leaves for the eggs. Darn things go from egg to adult in 21 days so they can really decimate a crop in short order.

BTW, your earlier note about the potatoes having late blight was more likely early blight. Late blight wipes out your plants, potato and tomato, within a day or two. It's really the nastiest of all potato/tomato diseases.

Happy gardening.
Thank you re: the Zucchini! I'm glad i seemed to miss out on the squash vine borers so far this year...

I actually have been researching like a maniac to figure out what the heck they were, except they really didn't look like the pictures on google pictures. Either way, I smashed them all and burned the leaves they were on with others :twisted: :twisted: . Hopefully that means that my potatoes themselves will be okay, and aren't damaged!

bogydave
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Great job
Looking good.
You learned quick :-)

DoubleDogFarm
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Very nice garden and photos. Thank you for sharing.

You can teach an old dog new tricks as well as a new dog old tricks. :wink:

Only harvest as much at one time that you are willing to put up that day.

Eric
Last edited by DoubleDogFarm on Mon Jul 11, 2011 7:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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SPierce
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Thank you so much everyone! I just up and went for it with everything this year, and so far it's paying off.

After mentioning earlier my battle with some Colorado potato beetles, I made the decision to pull one of my potato containers, and try to grow some fall carrots in it. I was heartbroken, because the plants were pretty much dead and they never bloomed, so i thought i'd have no potatoes.

Well, i was wrong. VERY wrong. New Lesson learned: Just cause a plant hasn't bloomed, doesn't mean it doesn't have potatoes! Also, rummaging through the dirt is like a treasure chest. You never know what you're going to find!

Also, earthworms somehow manage to get into containers, that are on cement. I have no idea how they managed that one :shock:

:-() :-() :clap: :clap: :bouncey: :bouncey: :bouncey:

[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Photo119.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Potatoes.jpg[/img]

I have them out drying on the deck on some paper towels- but I'm not sure how to store them, really. I know they aren't really "main crop" potatoes and would count as "new" potatoes, but i'd at least like to hang onto them a little bit longer, as i won't be able to eat this many next week!

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gixxerific
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Awesome crop from a pot. They should be alright keep them out of the sun and let them dry.

I have potatoes in the ground and in pots. They are so easy to harvest that way. I just dump the pot in my garden, to save the soil, and the spuds are right there. Easy breezy.

You have some good ones there I would be proud. :D

DoubleDogFarm
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You can't fool me, that's a box of raspberry glazed donuts. :lol:

Did you wash them, uh oh, you bad.

Eric

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SPierce
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gixxerific wrote:Awesome crop from a pot. They should be alright keep them out of the sun and let them dry.

I have potatoes in the ground and in pots. They are so easy to harvest that way. I just dump the pot in my garden, to save the soil, and the spuds are right there. Easy breezy.

You have some good ones there I would be proud. :D
Cool. Thank you! I did both in ground and in pot gardening this year, I'm already pre-planning next year on what I want to go in ground, and what i think I can grow in my containers so I have plenty of room and variety. I want more vining things, like watermelon and pumpkins, squash, etc which will be ground- and more things that grow up, like lima beans and potatoes, tomatoes, etc in the containers!

Also, i was debating over the soil. It all has potato plant root around/in it. It is OK to leave the root leftovers in there, and plant other things in the soil? HOw should i store them afterwards? Should I leave them outside all night?

I'm so absolutely ecstatic right now, i've been texting everyone to tell them that I grew them on my own and been sending everyone pics/posted up onto my FB too. I'm such a nerd!
DoubleDogFarm wrote:You can't fool me, that's a box of raspberry glazed donuts. :lol:

Did you wash them, uh oh, you bad.

Eric
:lol: at the donut comment :D

Actually, i read on a web site that they were supposed to be left out to dry after picking, so.. i just put them on the paper towel and left them outside. I haven't washed them, but they've been jostled around quite a bit. Hopefully they'll be okay!

DoubleDogFarm
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Phew, ok good. Let dry and brush off or not. Store in a cool dark location.

Look at you grinning ear to ear. :P

Eric

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SPierce
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DoubleDogFarm wrote:Phew, ok good. Let dry and brush off or not. Store in a cool dark location.

Look at you grinning ear to ear. :P

Eric
Got it! Basement it is. How long do they store for? What type of container is best?

And yeah. I was debating over whether to pull them or not, but they looked so pathetic and I wanted the container, so.... I just pulled them out. And a few potatoes came up with the plant that made me "ohhh!" so I spent an hour digging around to see what other sorts of potato treasures I could find, and I found plenty! :D I still one two plants left in my other container, that will hopefully make more potatoes ;D

My grandpa priest would be so proud if he was here to see. For me, gardening is not only a point of pride that helps to cover the grocery bill, but also near and dear to my heart; one grandfather was a farmer (unfortunately i can't afford to buy his farm, or I would :( ) and my other grandfather and I used to plant a garden together every year when I was small. Both have since passed on, so this brings back a lot of memories

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Runningtrails
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Great potatoes!

Lesson #1: keep up with the grass cutting and weeding!
Lesson #2: Start peppers and squash earlier next year.
Lesson #3: Only plant what will be used and no more. If we will not get the peas shellded, don't plant them.
Lesson #4: Keep all gardens near the house and close together for quicker and easier watering and care. I planted my cukes and some pole beans way out in the field and never see them.
Lesson #5: Only plant one variety of squash from each family. Preventing cross pollination is a pain.
Lesson #6: Also mentioned previously, only pick each day what will get processed that day.
Lesson #7: Don't start more projects than can possibly get finished in one season!

NOTE: There is no such thing as too much straw/hay. Layer it in the compost. Stash it in a corner. It will last for years.

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SPierce
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Runningtrails wrote:Great potatoes!

Lesson #1: keep up with the grass cutting and weeding!
Lesson #2: Start peppers and squash earlier next year.
Lesson #3: Only plant what will be used and no more. If we will not get the peas shellded, don't plant them.
Lesson #4: Keep all gardens near the house and close together for quicker and easier watering and care. I planted my cukes and some pole beans way out in the field and never see them.
Lesson #5: Only plant one variety of squash from each family. Preventing cross pollination is a pain.
Lesson #6: Also mentioned previously, only pick each day what will get processed that day.
Lesson #7: Don't start more projects than can possibly get finished in one season!

NOTE: There is no such thing as too much straw/hay. Layer it in the compost. Stash it in a corner. It will last for years.
Well said :D

Also, er, for the general posters reading this... my zucchini turned into the leaning tower of zucchini today.. it just fell right over. Not the container- but the plant! It's a bit top heavy with all the zucchini... is it going to be okay? I've got it in a container and now I'm worried ! :shock:

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PunkRotten
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Really nice post thanks for all the tips. I am still learning myself and found some of your tips to be true. I am gonna make some changes next year. I planted way too many tomatoes too. BTW, what are those yellow or orange flowers I see in your garden?

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SPierce
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PunkRotten wrote:Really nice post thanks for all the tips. I am still learning myself and found some of your tips to be true. I am gonna make some changes next year. I planted way too many tomatoes too. BTW, what are those yellow or orange flowers I see in your garden?
Those are my pathetic attempts to attract some bees- but it didn't work very well! Going to try for some lavender next year. The flowers are marigolds; i picked up a tray of random straw flowers and marigolds to plant in my empty bed and decided to put them around/behind the pumpkins to get bees used to going over there.

Hand pollination down there it is, this year! My containers have bees galore, but the ground garden doesn't. strange.

gardenbean
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Great picture of the spuds. Boil them and than add some butter and chives along with a touch of sea salt and crack pepper. There isn't anything better than home grown spuds:wink:
Learning as I go and surprising myself when it all comes together......

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SPierce
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Apparently, the best way to make home grown potatoes is to roast them in the oven with a prime rib or a pork roast. YUMMY! I tried boiling them, but they don't work as well. I think I'm going to try for some fingerling potatoes either this fall, or next year, too. I'm growing red right now! I just have to keep a better eye out for bugs, since i was seriously negligent this year and instead of researching what types of bugs I was seeing, I saw them and thought "oh, hey, bugs. Bugs are OK!" only to have them eat most of my lovely looking plants!

For those of you worried that your potato plants look horrible, take a look at my remaining container! They're almost half gone- but still making potatoes! :D I go out and check the undersides of the leaves every morning now, to make sure there aren't any colorado potato beetle larvae munching on them.
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-2-5.jpg[/img]

My container zucchini. They take a lot of water- but they apparently work in 18 gallon containers! Bought the blue rope totes and drilled holes in the bottom for drainage. I water twice a day, and deep, but it works- and they're doing better than in my in ground zucchini- if i were to try and stand the plant up, it'd be about 5 feet tall....
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-6-3.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-4-5.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-15-3.jpg[/img]

These lima bean plants were supposed to be a bushing variety, not a climbing one. Um... yeah. Learning to keep trellising of some kind on hand at all times...
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-8-3.jpg[/img]

My prized bell pepper.. grew it from seed, it was the only one that survived. No peppers yet- but it's growing taller! I sure as hell hope i get at least one this year so I can save seed from it! If i don't, I'm going to cry...
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-13-3.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-10-5.jpg[/img]

I planted my onions in-ground too deep, so even though I left them, i figured, hey, i might as well try some in containers!
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-12-2.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-11-3.jpg[/img]
^container also contains some fancy gourds... i tried to put some in the ground (see this pic)
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-3-4.jpg[/img]
I had originally planted 3. One of them just up and disappeared- another one got run over by the neighbors lawnmower or eaten by their dog... the third i decided to intervene so I moved it into my empty container, where some of my potatoes used to be. It's stunted, but new growth is showing up so I'm hopeful ;)

Patio tomato; note to self: BIGGER CONTAINER.
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-28.jpg[/img]

And the tomatoes on it
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-23-1.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-22-1.jpg[/img]

Tomato in a 20 gallon pot; note to self; BIGGER CONTAINER. It's rootbound. I think i'll be trying out some garbage can containers next year! Drill holes in the bottom, and voila!
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-20-1.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-29-2.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-24-2.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-25-2.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-26.jpg[/img]

The pumpkin; I apparently have some powdery mildew that I need to tackle with some milk solution, just need to find a sprayer i can wash out properly!
[img]https://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c25/Liskarialeman/Garden-19-2.jpg[/img]

It's now climbed halfway up my fence, and growing! I can't wait to get at least a pumpkin this fall!

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PunkRotten
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Hey are those tomatoes above "yellow pear". If so, I am growing them too. It's a pretty productive variety.

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SPierce
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PunkRotten wrote:Hey are those tomatoes above "yellow pear". If so, I am growing them too. It's a pretty productive variety.
Heya :D Yup, they are. I grew the regular red cherries last year and though I got a ton, i got so tired of the taste of them after, like, munching on 5...so i figured id' try a yellow variety! How do they taste?

DoubleDogFarm
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Apparently, the best way to make home grown potatoes is to roast them in the oven with a prime rib or a pork roast. YUMMY!
Yes! :D Once you have pork roast and root crops out of a Dutch oven, cast iron, you'll never go back. :wink:

Eric

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SPierce
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DoubleDogFarm wrote:
Apparently, the best way to make home grown potatoes is to roast them in the oven with a prime rib or a pork roast. YUMMY!
Yes! :D Once you have pork roast and root crops out of a Dutch oven, cast iron, you'll never go back. :wink:

Eric
:D :D :wink:

I'm making an attempt to grill some, right now- in foil patches... it's probably not going to work very well, I think I made the foil pouches too thick- but they're going to stay on there till they're done, even if i need to eat them for desert!

DoubleDogFarm
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Ah Yes, My parents used to do the foil on the grill thing. Many memories of soggy boiled potatoes or burnt. Let me know how they turn out. 8)


Eric

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SPierce
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DoubleDogFarm wrote:Ah Yes, My parents used to do the foil on the grill thing. Many memories of soggy boiled potatoes or burnt. Let me know how they turn out. 8)


Eric
I'm hoping good- I just took my steak (not home grown) and my zucchini (home grown) off the grill to eat- moved the potato pouches to the middle of the grill for more fire... hoping upon hope i didn't just waste 7 potatoes...

Edit: grilling fail. Epic suck, what a waste of potatoes. The coals went out, and they weren't even roasted yet. Augh! I guess i'll turn them into breakfast potatoes, with some eggs, and cook them that way!

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PunkRotten
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SPierce wrote:
PunkRotten wrote:Hey are those tomatoes above "yellow pear". If so, I am growing them too. It's a pretty productive variety.
Heya :D Yup, they are. I grew the regular red cherries last year and though I got a ton, i got so tired of the taste of them after, like, munching on 5...so i figured id' try a yellow variety! How do they taste?

They are not the best tasting but they are ok. Similar to cherry and grape tomatoes but a little sweeter. The sweetness is really subtle though. I have just been popping them in my mouth as snacks. Other than that I guess I can put them in salads. Not sure yet if I will grow them next year or not.

But so far it has produced more tomatoes than all the other varieties I am growing.

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SPierce
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PunkRotten wrote:
SPierce wrote:
PunkRotten wrote:Hey are those tomatoes above "yellow pear". If so, I am growing them too. It's a pretty productive variety.
Heya :D Yup, they are. I grew the regular red cherries last year and though I got a ton, i got so tired of the taste of them after, like, munching on 5...so i figured id' try a yellow variety! How do they taste?

They are not the best tasting but they are ok. Similar to cherry and grape tomatoes but a little sweeter. The sweetness is really subtle though. I have just been popping them in my mouth as snacks. Other than that I guess I can put them in salads. Not sure yet if I will grow them next year or not.

But so far it has produced more tomatoes than all the other varieties I am growing.
Ok :D So far I have monster plants, and green tomatoes, but no actual ripe ones, yet! I guess i'll have to see what I can do with them and if i like them once they ripen.. i ended up with too many plants, as usual!

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SPierce
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DoubleDogFarm wrote:Ah Yes, My parents used to do the foil on the grill thing. Many memories of soggy boiled potatoes or burnt. Let me know how they turn out. 8)


Eric
Okay, lesson learned. Put the potatoes in foil, and on the grill with butter and thyme. DON'T expect to eat them with the steak, take the pouches off the grill, move to a container, and leave them with the fridge overnight. They will take on a nice firmness and flavor. Then, when you're grilling something the next night, boil potatoes from the night before for about 15 minutes, to cook them the rest of the way through. They keep the firmness and the flavor, but don't get all soggy :)

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SPierce
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Figured I may as well pick up right where I left off! :P :lol:

First 2 lessons for this year:

1- starter pots. When i put the soil in, fill them to the TOP, not partway to the top. I had to throw out a bunch of leggy plants.

2- Soil. Be careful what type of soil I buy for starting my plants in. My regular brand wasn't out yet, so I picked up something from the local grain store. Let me tell you, I'm not happy with it at ALL. It's hard, crusty and dries out so damn fast I'm actually worried about the well being of my plants. This weekend i'll be transplanting all my transplants into newer (bigger) containers with the potting soil brand I trust, instead of some random Scotts thing (which seemed ok when I first opened the bag, but...) ugh!

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jal_ut
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Store the potatoes in a cool dark place. They will keep for a couple of weeks with no special attention. The refrigerator works very well for a small amount. They would keep months refrigerated. Once you taste them, they won't last long. :)
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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