artielox
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Joined: Mon Jun 13, 2011 2:54 pm
Location: Roebling, Nj

longneck squash issues

Well just to start off my plant is doing very well and is growing rapidly, the issue I'm having is the squash seem to grow about 3" then at the end where the flower is it starts to rot or is being eaten? I'm not sure where to begin but I'm loosing lots of potential food. I've thrown away all the ones that had rot on them so as soon as i can take a picture I'll post if it would better help. thanx in advance.

johnny123
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Joined: Tue Apr 19, 2011 1:53 pm

They may not have been pollinated.
They will grow some if not pollinated and then die.

You can also do some research on blossom end rot.
If a disease doesn't kill them and a bug doesn't eat them there may be something left for you.
Zone 47 Sector C

johnny123
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Every morning take a look and see if there are female blossoms open.
Take the center of the male flower and rub it in the center of the female blossom.
This should be done while it is cool outside in the morning.
If you get up too early the female bloosom that will open that day may still be closed. Check again after the sun has been up for an hour.
This is a one shot deal per blossom.
If they don't pollinate in around 6 to 8 hours the day they open they won't pollinate.
If a disease doesn't kill them and a bug doesn't eat them there may be something left for you.
Zone 47 Sector C

gardenbean
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Location: Westminster Colorado

My squash and cucumber plants haven't developed blooms just yet, but when they do, I want to try a sugar and water syrup made at home (mix sugar and water to a boil) place in handheld sprayer and spray the blooms to encourage bees to come around.

My question is has anyone had any success with this method? I think it would be a good thing to do since it encourages the bees to come around
Learning as I go and surprising myself when it all comes together......

artielox
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Joined: Mon Jun 13, 2011 2:54 pm
Location: Roebling, Nj

sugar water

That sounds like a good idea and I've heard of that before. my girlfriend and I were gonna plant some butterfly and bee plants around the garden to try and encourage them a lil. I just went out into the garden and used Q-tips and pollinated the females a bit, but I'm sure a very small paint brush with work better to release the pollen. I did notice a lot of ants in both the male and female flowers. Should i be worried about this and how to get rid of them. I seem to have a lot of ants in the garden too.

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jal_ut
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Location: Northern Utah Zone 5

johnny123, that is good info on the hand pollinating. I have never had a problem here because I keep bees on the property and there are plenty of pollinators. It seems though that this is a problem for many gardeners.

About the sugar water thing, I would discourage that. More likely to attract ants. What is needed for attracting bees is flowers. I have found bachelor buttons, chives, clover and oregano to be good. I am sure there are many others. The folks on the forum can tell what they find attractive to bees in their gardens. A succession of bloom is good so the bees get used to always finding something to their liking on your lot.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

nosta
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Joined: Sun Mar 20, 2011 11:46 am
Location: Upstate South Carolina

It definitely sounds like a pollination issue to me. I had to hand pollinate for about a week straight after I started getting blooms. The bees were nowhere to be found whereas they were plentiful in the past. I eventually came to the conclusion that the 13 year variety of cicada that hatched this spring scared them off. Those buggers are LOUD. The backyard was covered with them and everytime I would start an outdoor power tool(lawnmower, weedeater etc) they would swarm me. The wife said they were trying to mate with me. :wink: Fortunately their life span is only a few weeks and once they died off en masse the bee's returned. I was quite happy as hand pollination 20+ plants every morning beofre heading off to work was not a ton of fun.

Try Johnny123's tips for hand polliantion. It is sound advice.
Last edited by nosta on Mon Jun 13, 2011 11:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.

TZ -OH6
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Joined: Fri Jul 25, 2008 11:27 pm
Location: Mid Ohio

Minnesota midget melon flowers early and profusely and will draw in the type of bees that like squashes. I tried planting things like cosmos and nausturtiums to draw in good insects but both of them took a long time to grow to flowering size, long after the vegetables had begun flowering. We have feral Dames Rockets, which is a pretty perenial that blooms just as the vegetables start.

johnny123
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Joined: Tue Apr 19, 2011 1:53 pm

A box of mixed doughnuts on my picnic table attracted more than I wanted.
The box was open on one corner and there must of be 20 bees inside the box.

But like already said, alot of flowers around the yard works the best.

Not that you want them but the cucumber beatle does well at pollinating.
You don't even have to try to attract them.
They will find you. LOL
If a disease doesn't kill them and a bug doesn't eat them there may be something left for you.
Zone 47 Sector C

Moley
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Joined: Sun May 01, 2011 5:00 pm
Location: Brooklyn NY

Nothing like a 10 foot wide swatch of invasive honeysuckle growing over my back fence to attract bees, I counted about 2 dozen over the span of an 1hr this morning.

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