7racecar7
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Garden Pest don't get it.

Hello,

I have grown cucumbers for the past 4 years without an issue. I have garden that is fenced in and has a bout a 3 to 4 ft wire mesh all around it I also have the wire mes about a ft down below the ground.

The issue is the tops of young cucumber plans now have been eaten in the ground, in a raised bed and in a ft high container.

Any ideas, in my yard i have rabbits, groundhogs, and i keep seeing this little mole mess with me in the garden. Early I also had the same problem with my sugar snap peas...just the tops of the plants. an and what ever it is stopped by for a snack on my lettuce too.

I even put some wire next around one cucumber plant and it looks like one of the tops was eaten off...im confused.

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Kisal
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Well, moles are carnivores. They aren't interested in your plants, only the earthworms and grubs in the soil. They eat underground. Voles, however, commonly use mole tunnels, but they also eat underground. They'll eat the roots of your plants and, sometimes, pull the entire plant underground.

Rabbits and groundhogs are herbivores and eat aboveground.

Without pictures, I can't give any further advice. :(
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7racecar7
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Photos

Here they are one is in a raised bed the other is in a pot.

[img]https://thewebmastere.com/plant1.jpg[/img]

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Kisal
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The damage to the plants is typical of both ground hogs and rabbits. Both animals can climb fences the height of yours, but personally, I think it's more likely that it's the groundhog.

To prevent this, install the fencing so that it is loose at the top. That way, when something tries to climb it, the weight of the animal pulls the top edge of the fencing over, and the animal finds itself hanging upside down. Not many animals will put up with that.
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7racecar7
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Prob

Well there has been a groundhog living under my deck for the past few years, this is the first year i didnt uses bags of human hair (from a barbershop) around the outside of the fence. I may try that again, also there are baby rabbits again, but that has been the same, wondering how much that hair actually worked.

never had an issue till this year, ill try your fence method too, thank you.

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rainbowgardener
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Since I live with a resident ground hog, I'm agreeing with Kisal that while it could be rabbit or groundhog, I would guess groundhog (or groundHOG as Applestar likes to say). I keep it away from things with deer netting wrapped around stakes, stapled down at the bottom (earth staples) and pulled together over the top, so the plants are completely caged. Works most of the time...
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.17HMR

orgoveg
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.17 HMR is great, but only if you have time to sit and wait for them (and if you don't live in the city). There was some discussion awhile ago where someone suggested ammonia soaked rags to deter the critters. I'm about to try that, myself.

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Kisal
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I and my fellow rehabbers used to recommend ammonia soaked rags to get animals out from under a house or shed, but I don't think they'd be very effective in the open air. I also don't think they'd be very effective once they've dried. JMO, anyway. :)
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orgoveg
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Kisal wrote:I and my fellow rehabbers used to recommend ammonia soaked rags to get animals out from under a house or shed, but I don't think they'd be very effective in the open air. I also don't think they'd be very effective once they've dried. JMO, anyway. :)
Well, shucks. It sounded good, in theory :)

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Kisal
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And it does work well ... but only in enclosed spaces. ;)

You have checked your fence carefully for possible entryways? If you're positive it's secure -- and remember that animals can squeeze through remarkably small spaces -- then perhaps just running an extra 12" high piece of wire mesh around the top edge of your existing fence would be all you'd need to do. A few times of trying to climb over and finding himself upside down might be enough to discourage him from his garden raids.

Another thing to consider is encouraging him to find other living quarters, preferably closer to some other food source. :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

annastasia76
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I didn't realize that ground hogs could get into a pot or raised bed, I thought they were similar to gophers and couldn't jump, atleast I think gophers can't jump, I've never seen them completely out of the ground.
Annastasia

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Kisal
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Groundhogs are fairly large animals. An average adult will weigh 8 to 10 lbs and be 16 to 20 inches long. The OP said the container was only a foot high, which would be no challenge at all for an animal that size. They have feet similar to those of a squirrel, and although they don't scamper around in trees, fences are not insurmountable. They routinely dig as deep as 4', so the 1-foot underground wire barrier wouldn't necessarily stop one, either.

It could be that the animal is squeezing through some small space where the wire mesh comes together. (I've had young raccoons the size of a groundhog escape from cages made of 2" x 4" welded wire mesh, and I never did manage to find out where they were getting out. :roll: )

The lifespan in the wild averages 2 to 3 years, but can be as long as 6 years. Unless the groundhog under his deck is a female and produces babies every year, it may be simplest for racecar just to wait for the animal to die a natural death. [img]https://i252.photobucket.com/albums/hh27/Kisal_photos/dunno.gif[/img]
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

7racecar7
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videos

well if found some videos on you tube with these ground hogs running up fences a bit larger than mine, ill prob just go over the fence and make sure its stapled down tight everywhere. I have room to add about another ft up to the highest plank up top

They are only eating cucumbers, squash, lettuce, and broccoli....the strawberries, corn, potatoes, tomatoes, egg plant, peppers, and watermelon are untouched....or are they next in line?

BP
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Kisal wrote:Groundhogs are fairly large animals. An average adult will weigh 8 to 10 lbs and be 16 to 20 inches long. The OP said the container was only a foot high, which would be no challenge at all for an animal that size. They have feet similar to those of a squirrel, and although they don't scamper around in trees, fences are not insurmountable. They routinely dig as deep as 4', so the 1-foot underground wire barrier wouldn't necessarily stop one, either.

It could be that the animal is squeezing through some small space where the wire mesh comes together. (I've had young raccoons the size of a groundhog escape from cages made of 2" x 4" welded wire mesh, and I never did manage to find out where they were getting out. :roll: )

The lifespan in the wild averages 2 to 3 years, but can be as long as 6 years. Unless the groundhog under his deck is a female and produces babies every year, it may be simplest for racecar just to wait for the animal to die a natural death. [img]https://i252.photobucket.com/albums/hh27/Kisal_photos/dunno.gif[/img]
Groundhogs DO climb trees

BP
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[img]https://i207.photobucket.com/albums/bb9/BP991/groundhogintree.jpg[/img]

garden5
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BP wrote:[img]https://i207.photobucket.com/albums/bb9/BP991/groundhogintree.jpg[/img]
:lol:

I never knew that they climbed trees!

I agree that they can be very troublesome in the garden.

One solution is to use a live-trap cage-trap to catch one and then release it elsewhere.
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applestar
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rainbowgardener wrote: (or groundHOG as Applestar likes to say)
I call'em like I see'em :evil:

Except last year when I had a reprieve, the groundHOG (same one or not) arrives with the hot weather. We're having a heat wave right now, and sure enough, I saw one come into my yard yesterday.

I really don't mind them eating the weedy lawn -- I offer a mixed salad buffet :wink: -- but when they insist on climbing my dwarf apple tree and eating the best apples by taking a few bites and leaving them scattered about (at least the squirrel will steal just one whole apple), I resort to electric fence. I'll have to repair it -- I accidentally cut the wire last year -- and start mowing underneath to keep the grass from touching the lowest wire.

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rainbowgardener
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Good picture! I didn't know they climbed either, until we moved here with a mulberry tree. I never see them climbing except when there are berries on the mulberry, in which case they go way up in the tree and the whole top of the tree bounces...

They love the mulberries and will do all kinds of athletic feats to get them. Grab a lower branch and pull it down and stand on hind feet, stretched very long, eating all the berries off.
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