tasmanian7001
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Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2011 8:32 pm
Location: az

Need help with squash identification and cucumber overgrowth

Hello all!
This is my 1st season doing gardening and I must say that I am hooked. I started a basic tomato and cucumber garden but I got extras; living in windy Arizona we have lots of pollen in the air - lol.
The issue is I have all these squash plants that I have zero idea what they are or when to harvest. I was hoping for at least their names so I can research them.
But here is what I have:
This one is the monster plant compared to the others

[img]https://i1029.photobucket.com/albums/y352/tasmaniandevil1/100_0980.jpg[/img]

Here is it's first squash
[img]https://i1029.photobucket.com/albums/y352/tasmaniandevil1/100_0982.jpg[/img]
It is about the size of two of my fists

The rest are pretty close to the ground
[img]https://i1029.photobucket.com/albums/y352/tasmaniandevil1/100_0981.jpg[/img]
This one is a little smaller than a baseball

[img]https://i1029.photobucket.com/albums/y352/tasmaniandevil1/100_0978.jpg[/img]

As for my cucumber...
Wow.... this stuff grows like crazy. I am not sure what to do here. Can I just let it be and dig through the leaves for the umbers when they are ready?
[img]https://i1029.photobucket.com/albums/y352/tasmaniandevil1/100_0976.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i1029.photobucket.com/albums/y352/tasmaniandevil1/100_0977.jpg[/img]

I appreciate any help =)

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jal_ut
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Location: Northern Utah Zone 5

Where did you get your plants? Were they not labeled?

The first one kinda looks like a pumpkin.

The others look like some weird cross of some sort. Unless you have some squash I have never heard of. That is why I ask where you got the plants.

All squash is tender and tasty in a stir fry when it is young and the skin is tender. You can harvest them like that or wait and let them mature and see what you get. Mature hubbard, banana, acorn, and butternut squash are great when mature, but some squash are not. Alas none of these look like the varieties I mentioned.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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jal_ut
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Oh, about the cukes, ya just look through the jungle for fruit every couple of days.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

tasmanian7001
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Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2011 8:32 pm
Location: az

Thank you for the reply! To answer your question, I didn't label anything since tomatoes and cucumbers are easy to tell apart and were the only things I actually planted. The rest of my garden, well, blew in. I live at the edge of state land and Arizona gets some pretty serious dust storms.
That being said, my garden bed was filled with various weeds, trees, and ... well .... vegetables. Perhaps the reason why I, nor yourself, can find these online is because they aren't normally harvested? lol.

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jal_ut
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Location: Northern Utah Zone 5

OK, that will explain why they don't look like the regular cultivated varieties. They are probably what I suspected, a cross of who knows what. I would maybe let one fruit on each plant grow to maturity for the heck of it, and eat some of them when young and tender in a stir fry.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

tasmanian7001
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Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2011 8:32 pm
Location: az

Other than the finger nail method, is there any other way to tell when they reach maturity? Does the vine change color or anything visual?

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jal_ut
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One clue that the squash has reached maturity is that it stops growing. The skin will get harder and the color may change a bit. Not a drastic color change like a green apple turning red, but a deeper shade of whatever color it was when small. Usually the vine doesn't do anything drastic until frost. Most squash is tasty when small and tender. You can steam it or make a stir fry.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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