Sandee
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Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Oct 29, 2006 7:36 pm
Location: Vermont

I'm new to gardening and need to know if you can over winter

I am fairly new to gardening and have bought some spring bulbs to plant. I live in Vermont and they just arrived. I have had ferocious weather ever since and can not get out to get them into the ground. Can I overwinter them somehow and plant them next fall, but earlier in the fall?

Newt
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Posts: 1868
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 2:44 am
Location: Maryland zone 7

Hi Sandee,

You can plant them up until the ground freezes. If your ground is frozen then you can either keep them in the refrigerator for 12 to 16 weeks and then plant in pots. Do keep them AWAY from fruit like apples and pears as these fruits will off gas and ruin your bulbs. You could also plant them in pots, water well and keep them in an unheated garage for 3 or 4 months. Then you can bring the pots indoors and they will sprout. When they are finished blooming you can plant them in the garden when the soil is workable.

You should find these helpful.
https://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/horticulture/DG1116.html
https://www.tulipworld.com/tulip.asp?contentloc=/info/bulbcare/Forcing_Bulbs.shtml
https://www.tulipworld.com/tulip.asp?contentloc=/info/bulbcare/Forcing_Bulbs.shtml
https://www.extension.umn.edu/projects/yardandgarden/AAMG/bulbs/SavingForcedBulbsAfterBloom.html
https://www.johnscheepers.com/tips.html
https://www.uaex.edu/Other_Areas/publications/PDF/FSA-2096.pdf

Newt

Sandee
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Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Oct 29, 2006 7:36 pm
Location: Vermont

Thank you, Newt

I don't have a place to grow them all indoors, I was afraid of that. This happened to me before. I think I will have to begin buying my bulbs locally in order to have them in time to plant. It seems as though they always manage to send them to me when it is nearly too late. We are expecting snow tonight and tomorrow, and I tried to get out today between rain and snow to put some in. I managed to put in all the plants I had, but I still have a lot of bulbs to get in. Working all day, makes it very difficult, by the time I get home it is dark, so weekends is the only time I have, and of course, the bad weather always hits on the weekends.

Sandee
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Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Oct 29, 2006 7:36 pm
Location: Vermont

Spring Bulbs

Newt,

Can these bulbs be kept in the fridge until spring and then planted?

Newt
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Posts: 1868
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 2:44 am
Location: Maryland zone 7

Sandee, I do understand. So, here's what I suggest as I once had a similar situation with 500 potted plants that needed to get into the ground for the winter. If you can get out there now, even if it's not the bed or beds where you want to plant, and cover the ground with an old blanket or sheets. Yup, let the snow and rain fall on it. As long as the ground isn't frozen, the blanket or sheets will keep the ground warm enough so you can plant. Then leave the blanket or sheet on for a couple of weeks so the bulbs can grow some roots and settle in and the ground doesn't freeze. In the spring, after they bloom, you can dig them up and plant them where you want them.

Newt

Newt
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Posts: 1868
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 2:44 am
Location: Maryland zone 7

We were posting at the same time. You could try keeping them in the refrigerator for the winter and see what they do. I've never tried that, but I have known of folks that kept them in the refrigerator until March or so and then planted them. It's worth a try.

Newt

Guest

it depends on the type of bulb if they are tulips daffadils or bulbs you want to flower in the ground as you don't have to dig them or store in fridge what kind of bulbs

opabinia51
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Posts: 4659
Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2004 9:58 pm
Location: Victoria, BC

With our Daffodils and other fall bulbs, we just plant them in the soil in the fall and leave them their all winter. They freeze and come back just fine. So, you don't need to store them inside.

If you have extreme low temperatures; you can provide a nice mulch of mulched up leaves without a green on top. The leaves will help keep the soil warmer then if it were directly exposed to the elements.

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