Atomike
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon May 02, 2011 11:02 pm
Location: Central Nebraska

Broadleaf Herbicide too soon?

I live in Nebraska, and we had snow as late as 3 weeks ago. So I put down my crabgrass prevention stuff about 2 weeks ago. My problem is this - I am now getting dandelions in my yard. Lots. And I'm worried that if I put down broad-leaf herbicide anytime soon, I will over-fertilize my lawn, and burn it. I know very, very little about lawn care, but I'm interested in learning. Right now, my only source of information is the herbicide/fertilizer timing chart at Menards where I buy my stuff. Am I right that I need to wait to take care of my broadleaf issues?
Thanks for any help and suggestions!

Atomike
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon May 02, 2011 11:02 pm
Location: Central Nebraska

Guess I should have asked a different question -
Can anyone recommend a good forum for lawn care questions?

probe1957
Full Member
Posts: 22
Joined: Tue May 17, 2011 4:38 pm
Location: Central IL

You can certainly get broad-leaf weed control products that don't have fertilizer. Check at Lesco or John Deere.

Another option you might want to consider is hiring someone to do the chemical work on your lawn. I think you will find you can hire it done nearly as cheaply as you can do it yourself. Do not go with Tru-Green or ChemLawn though. Trust me on that. Look for an independent guy with a good reputation. Your lawn will thank you.

cynthia_h
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 7501
Joined: Tue May 06, 2008 11:02 pm
Location: El Cerrito, CA

Sorry; I lost track of your message. :oops: Had meant to reply *much* sooner!

Please see the [url=https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1782]Sticky[/url] at the top of our Lawn Forum about lawn care. Many members have also had success with [url=https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34078]corn gluten meal[/url] as a broad-leaf weed suppressant. This has the advantage of leaving the subsurface life intact, life which can invigorate the deeper grass roots, giving your grass a better chance when adverse conditions arise.

Cynthia H.
Sunset Zone 17, USDA Zone 9

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