tedly
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Rabbit Proof Fence-A Little Help Please!

Last year I lost a big chunk of my garden to various wildlife. One of the biggest offenders was a rabbit (at least one, possibly more). Among the things I am doing this year is putting up a rabbit proof fence. A quick trip to the hardware store gave me a good idea of what I'll need and how much it's going to cost. Cost is the major issue right now, so I'm going with green plastic garden fencing. I'm planning on burying it about 6 inches in the soil, which will leave just shy of 3 feet above the ground. Is this deep enough and tall enough to keep the buck-toothed varmints out of my garden, or am I going to need another plan?

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alaskagold
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I would bury a little deeper. We have snow shoe hares that can dig a foot down.

tedly
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The fencing I'm looking at is only 40 inches high. If I bury it a foot that will leave less than 2 1/2 feet above ground. Is that enough height to keep them out?

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alaskagold
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If you can find just a tad bigger, I would do it. I use it to keep the moose out as well. Not sure if you have deer and deer do not care for the feel of plastic fencing from what I have seen.

tedly
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Deer haven't really been a problem yet. They're definitely around, I just haven't seen them within a mile of the house. Coyotes and bears are a different story... The rabbit that I've seen is kinda small, smaller than the ones my sister used to raise when we were kids. Don't know if that makes any difference or not, but the little @#$! can sure eat!

tedly
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Oh yeah, anything taller than that plastic fencing is double the price. :( I was hoping to only drop $60 for it, not $125 - $200. Unfortunately price is a big consideration right now, but if it means the difference between getting a decent crop and only getting some tomatoes and potatoes again I'll spring for it.

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soil
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you don't need to bury anything, thats just more work on your part and animals can dig deep. all you need to do is simply bend it at the ground making sure it sticks out AWAY from the fence a good ft or so on the outside. most animals are going to try and dig right next to the fence making it as easy as possible for them. never to think of going back a ft or two and digging a tunnel.

we do this for our chicken areas, coyotes and other predators always try and dig right next to the fence where the wire mesh which is basically on the topsoil covered with a little mulch and that stops them.

heres a little text diagram

(inside garden)fence > ||_ < wire mesh (outside garden)
For all things come from earth, and all things end by becoming earth.

tedly
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:shock: Never thought of that... That's a heck of an idea! Thanks!

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Kisal
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Soil is right. You don't need to bury the fence unless you're trying to thwart something like voles or other underground burrowers that attack the plants from below. You can bend the wire, as Soil described, or you can just lay boards along the bottom of the fencing. That's what I did, to keep my little dog from getting out of my yard by digging out under the fence.

I used 16' 2x12 boards, but 2x10, or even 2x8, would work just as well, I'm sure. And they certainly don't have to be new boards. Get old ones, if they're available to you for free.

You could even rip a sheet of plywood into strips, if that's what you have around. If all you have is 4x boards, strap a couple lengths together with cleats or even something like strips of plumber's tape screwed down. Wouldn't necessarily be pretty, but it'll keep the critters out.

Lay the boards flat on the ground, butted up against the outside of the bottom edge of your fence. :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

DoubleDogFarm
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Yep! I'm with Soil on this one. When we put in a deer fence, we usually lay about a foot on the ground outward.

An alternatives is a live trap and relocate or invite to dinner.


Eric

tedly
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I've never had rabbit stew before...
[img]https://i644.photobucket.com/albums/uu165/tedlyb/Elmer_Fudd-rabbit-season.jpg[/img]

DoubleDogFarm
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Taste like chicken! Well kind of. :wink:


Eric

annastasia76
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be careful of the plastic fencing, we have had the rabbits chew right through it (but that was bird netting, the fencing I know is thicker), now I am looking into getting chicken wire.
Annastasia

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alaskagold
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Tedly, here is another thought. Go on craigs list for your area and see if someone may have fence they are selling or don't want anymore.

I feel you on the price of things, especially when I pay 40% more than you have to pay. I do this quite often, and usually find good deals on things people don't want or just don't need. Saves me a bundle.

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