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farmerlon
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TZ -OH6 wrote:.... There are many other choices if you want heirloom seeds. ...
I would also add Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds and Southern Exposure Seed Exchange to that list.
I have had good experiences with both of those companies.

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soil
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No no. I knew you weren't getting them from the grocery store, but I was afraid that if I didn't emphasize and explain properly, some readers might get that impression.
i get seeds from the grocery store all the time, and the health food stores bulk bins. whats wrong with that?
For all things come from earth, and all things end by becoming earth.

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applestar
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OK. Seeds sold as SEEDS by reputable and reliable sources are often rigorously (?) tested to be free of diseases. Seeds sold as food are not concerned with plant diseases that won't affect humans or flavor.

I'm pretty sure jal emphasized this point once or twice, so I was respecting that.

I don't want to give the impression to new Gardeners that there are no risks when you use grocery store food seeds as your source. That said, I've said before that I personally have grown seeds from organic bulk bins as well as use seeds saved from dinner veggies/fruits and cut up pantry potatoes and grow slips from store-bought sweet potatoes. You want to be AWARE of, and accept that there might be some risk.

Also, let's note that some food seeds won't grow because of the way they're processed (heat, gas, irradiation, chemicals) or stored, and they are no guarantee of their age/when they were harvested (Packed for year/date). No GERMINATION rate tested or noted as with some seed packets.
Oh! And typically no variety name specified, though sometimes there are rare exceptions, usually with fresh produce.

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Ozark Lady
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90% of the time, I will pick an heirloom over a hybrid.

My reasoning is: Hybrids were intentionally crossed to give this flavor and that resistance. If I save seeds from them, I might be able to get an exact duplicate, or I might get taste, and no resistance, or resistance and no taste. If I am patient long enough, I can take that hybrid and develop a tomato that is to my liking, and survives my conditions, maybe, as long as the original hybrid had these qualities inbred.

Now with heirlooms, I may not get the taste that I want... taste is subjective, some like sweet, some like tart. Or I may not get the resistance that I need... but they have been bred for a very long time, and are stable. So, if I don't like the taste this year, it won't be any better next year... unless I purposely cross it with a tasty tomato. When I do that cross on purpose... I just created a hybrid, and now I have to stabilize it to have consistent results... or make the same cross every year!

I choose heirlooms for the stability of their seeds, and I will do the crossing myself, or not!
Talk to your plants.... If your plants talk to you... Run!

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soil
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Oh! And typically no variety name specified, though sometimes there are rare exceptions, usually with fresh produce.
good points applestar. though i will say not all stores are the same. the local health food store has bulk bins that are way better than the grocery store. they have more varieties( rare heirlooms 30 kinds of beans alone)

all of the stuff the health food store orders is raw and organic, and non treated even the almonds which is hard to find( and ive got 40 of those sprouting yay! )

that being said these are words to listen to
You want to be AWARE of, and accept that there might be some risk.
So, if I don't like the taste this year, it won't be any better next year... unless I purposely cross it with a tasty tomato. When I do that cross on purpose... I just created a hybrid, and now I have to stabilize it to have consistent results... or make the same cross every year!

I choose heirlooms for the stability of their seeds, and I will do the crossing myself, or not!
that makes me :D great post[/quote]
For all things come from earth, and all things end by becoming earth.

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jal_ut
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No no. I knew you weren't getting them from the grocery store, but I was afraid that if I didn't emphasize and explain properly, some readers might get that impression.
OK. Yes, I have said many times, "I will not put any part of a store bought potato in my garden, nor my compost heap." The risk of disease is very real if you do.

Dry seeds from the grocery store may be less likely than potatoes, to have diseases that would give you problems. Those seeds have not been checked for germination, nor diseases. Seeds intended to be sold for planting are checked for these things. The seed companies want you to be happy and be a return customer.

Those dry grocery store seeds will germinate and grow crops for you. You won't know the variety. Does that matter? The price is right. I planted some pinto beans from the grocery one time. They did very well. I don't usually plant anything from the grocery.

OK, you have heard some pros and cons, so you decide. Given enough time to experiment, we all arrive at a style of gardening that works for us. It is on going, always learning. I appreciate your tips and shared knowledge.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

kgall
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Location: New Hampshire

Plant a little of each...What could it hurt? (Unless you are seed saving perhaps)

My first year gardening I bought seedlings at a local family farm stand. They did OK. Last year I started everything on my own... What A Difference! I would never go back!

NHGardener
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Has anyone ordered seeds from Victoryseeds.com? They seem to have a nice philosophy re: heirlooms and open pollinated varieties (which is all they sell). Just wondering if there were any thoughts about them.

kgall
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I've never ordered from them. I order from Johnny's. It's close to home and the selection is beautiful!

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soil
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Those dry grocery store seeds will germinate and grow crops for you. You won't know the variety.
the seeds in bulk bins at my store are clearly labeled for variety and where they came from.
For all things come from earth, and all things end by becoming earth.



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