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Larry Mikeska
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Fall cleanup/weed control

Big weed problem this year. Did not have the time to pull'em as they came up and they got out of control.
Now it's fall. Any pros' to chemically spray (roundup®) to kill weeds for next year, before I run the big rototiller? Cons'?

We bought a small gas tiller for next year to go in between the plants (too late for this year) and I'm planning to keep up with that through the next summer. And I usually rototill Preen® in the spring. But if treating the soil in the fall will help...
Anyone with past experience?
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gixxerific
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Roundup is a bad word around here, I will leave it at that.

I just pulled weeds in a few sections of my yard that got out of control. It went pretty fast especially after a big rain. Watering always help when pulling weeds.

What about hoing them out. I don't mean on the corner either.

If you just don't have time to pull them than till them in for a green mulch if that is what you are going to do. But Roundup is not good for you, your family or the planet.

I hope this helped maybe just a little at least.

sorry I couldn't help it https://www.organicconsumers.org/monsanto/roundup.cfm

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farmerlon
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Oh my goodness ... :shock:
Personally, I could not even consider spraying Roundup (or any other herbicide) on any area where I would grow food.

For your health, and the health of the environment, I would recommend any number of "mechanical" controls instead of chemicals.
Mechanical controls might include: tilling, plowing, hoeing, pulling, or the application of paper/cardboard or plastic mulches.

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Francis Barnswallow
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Or you could use explosives. 8)

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farmerlon
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Francis Barnswallow wrote:Or you could use explosives. 8)
Yes, the trace nitrates left behind by the explosives might make for some lush leaf growth! :lol: :P :lol:

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engineeredgarden
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I believe if I had a traditional in-ground garden and had a bad weed problem, white plastic sheeting would be laid down over the entire area, then i'd cut a hole wherever I wanted to plant something. Of course the whole area would be tilled up first, though.....

EG

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tomf
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The seeds are spread so round up would only do so much and as others have said "not where I eat". Just till them in and they will compost, till them in the spring again.

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rainbowgardener
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Since you asked about Cons, here's one of the threads we had here discussing some of the cons of Roundup:

https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=13668&postdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=roundup&start=0

There are plenty of people who use the Roundup, which is considered less harmful than some herbicides, since it breaks down in the soil faster. And of course everyone has to find their own style and philosophy of gardening and make their own choices about that kind of thing and we try to encourage gardeners of all stripes to join the discussion and respect each other's point of view.

If you are going to be tilling anyway, why not just till the weeds under? You may be tilling under some weed seeds too, but as noted the Roundup doesn't kill the seeds, just the plants. The plants will be killed by tilling them under, so the effect seems to be just the same, minus the time, money, and environmental toxicity of doing the Roundup step first.
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I'm with RG, till them in. You'll be adding organic material back into the soil. If you see any large weeds that have noticeably gone to seed, those you can pull, but otherwise the rest would make for good tillage.

Also, in the spring when you plant your garden, give mulching a try. Just lay down a bunch of hay, stray, or grass clippings all around your plants. You'll have a lot less weeds this way.
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Larry Mikeska
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Thank you everyone.

We too are concerned about chemically treating the garden for weeds, even with Roundups claim of limited time in the soil. That is why we thought spraying in the fall.

We tried the black fabric deal in 2009, cutting the holes for the veggie plants. However, the weeds still grew under the fabric. It pushed up, much like Jiffy Pop (for those of you whom remember stove top popcorn). It looked really funny!

I am glad we purchased the Homelite® tiller for next year. I think this will be the answer.

[img]https://www.homedepot.com/catalog/productImages/300/37/37373c30-213a-4a5f-8d52-69c9f0a22e8d_300.jpg[/img]
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gixxerific
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A little tip in, in the early spring a few weeks before you are ready to plant even a month. Get you beds ready and water them like you would for vegetables. You will actually be watering the weeds. Doing this you will give what seeds are in there a chance to sprout before all the veggies are in and thus being easier to eradicate. The more you can get before it's full of veggies the easier it will be the rest of the year.

Mulch, mulch, mulch.

Oh and compost, compost, compost. :D

You will be fine.

I always use grass clippings as a mulch and have very few weeds to deal with.

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Halfway
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Wow, my post was removed.

Did I disagree with the mainstream or the fringe?

RoundUp has it uses and I do not think it is a bad word around here so please do not speak for me. I thought we had some tolerance here?

I didn't know we had become "militant" green.

Use the Roundup to kill off everything to include the plants still attempting to produce seed.

After a week and before the first killing frost, till it all under.

I am in the process of completing an acre conversion to wildflowers and would be a narrow minded religious zealot if I felt that my roundup usage would somehow "harm" the planet.

Please, let's maintain some common sense.

The keyboard you are responding to or deleting posts comes from a pc full of chemicals (many toxic metals), the log train to get it to you is full of petro products and smog producing emissions, the electricity from coal, and most of the plastics will NOT be recycled.

Please.
Zone 4a.

growitall
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carpets

I have seen where laying down old carpet over the winter killed all the weeds, AND provided a good dose of compost from the carcasses of the weeds.
with this seed I plant the hopes of what I might reap in the fall

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tomf
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Some times it is not what you say but how you say it.

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gixxerific
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Re: carpets

growitall wrote:I have seen where laying down old carpet over the winter killed all the weeds, AND provided a good dose of compost from the carcasses of the weeds.
I'm not sure if carpet would degrade over a single winter. Could be that's why I'm not sure. I would think cardboard to a better alternative in this case. :D

DoubleDogFarm
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My post was also deleted. Thank you Roger. :)


Some times it is not what you say but how you say it.
I agree 100%
The keyboard you are responding to or deleting posts comes from a pc full of chemicals (many toxic metals), the log train to get it to you is full of petro products and smog producing emissions, the electricity from coal, and most of the plastics will NOT be recycled.
I also agree 100%


On the carpet weed barrier, if it is synthetic it may never break down. Natural fiber and jute backing would be fine.

Eric

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jal_ut
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Just till it!
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

DoubleDogFarm
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Less and less tilling here. If at all, the paths between the raised beds. Lowering the paths and raising the beds. Heavily mulching the beds also. I should have less and less weeds over time. :D


Eric

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gixxerific
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DoubleDogFarm wrote:Less and less tilling here. If at all, the paths between the raised beds. Lowering the paths and raising the beds. Heavily mulching the beds also. I should have less and less weeds over time. :D


Eric
Boom you got it, I would much rather till now than use roundup. Than begin the heavy mulch treatment than over time as DDF said tilling may not be needed and the lack of weeds will amaze you.


Again Mulch, Mulch, Mulch

I love mulch, I hate weeds.

P.S. unless those weeds can used as mulch. :lol:

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