gumbo2176
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Five Year Anniversary (Kinda Long)

No, not our wedding anniversary. Today marks 5 years since Katrina hit New Orleans and the Gulf Coast Region. As I sit here and type this, we are having very nasty weather with almost constant rainfall varying between sprinkles and gully washers and it is reminding me of that fateful day.

I stayed in the city when it hit while my wife and her daughter left for higher, dryer ground in central La. at her father's house and her son headed back to LSU for his sophomore year.

It was about this time of evening that the worst of the storm was over but we still had some gusty winds and occasional rain. The streets in my area were flooded with about 1 ft. of water but it was nowhere near the house and I breathed a huge sigh of relief. The termite eaten 40 foot pecan tree my neighbor had near the rear of my property did blow over crushing my fence, but my house was relatively unscathed. I called my wife by cellphone to tell her all was well and it may take a day or two to clear the streets of all the debris from fallen trees, windblown parts of houses and assorted trash.

It was about 3 hrs. later that I began to think something was not right since the water that should have been going down was actually coming up at a steady pace. First it overtook my lawn, then the walkway directly in front of the house then------inside the first floor. I started scrambling because my stepson lived down there and had tons of electronics, books, CD's, clothes------------plus all the things a 20 yr. old leaves behind when going off to college. Inside of an hour, the water was waste deep and still rising and I put things up as high as I could after carrying what I could upstairs. I locked the door and hoped for the best. Two ladies across the street caught my attention since I didn't know they had stayed too. We talked and I offered them to come to my house since it was a 2 story if the water got in their house. They declined.

Tuesday morning I awoke to cries of help from the 2 ladies across the street. Their cats woke them up by jumping from dresser to bed and they realized water was a foot deep in their house. By Tuesday morning it was me, the 2 ladies from across the street and their 2 cats. I dipped my hands in the water and gave it a little taste and it was saltwater, so I knew the lake was now in my front yard. Now it was a matter of just how deep it would get.

Wednesday rolls around and the water has stopped rising. It leveled off at 4 1/2 ft. inside my first floor. It was hot as all get out, the only wind blowing was when the mosquitoes buzzed our heads and the rescue helicopters flew overhead looking for folks to save. I was still in a "wait to see if the water goes down mode", had tons of food, over 100 gallons of potable water and 4 propane tanks full of gas to cook with.

Now, as if things aren't bleak enough, my brother-in-law shows up at my house and informs me he has 8 people at his house and want to move them over to my house to make plans to get out the next day.

By Wednesday night, I have 12 people in my house, the oldest being an 81 yr. old woman and the youngest being 18 male, 4 cats, 3 dogs and a hamster. We ate like pigs since I had a good bit of food in my freezer that got cooked that night. I even had ice, a commodity that was more precious than gold at that point in time. We ate our fill, bagged up the rest of the food and put it on my back porch to rot till I could return home to deal with it, then cleaned the dishes and put them away. There was no sleep that night. The heat was unbearable, there was not a trace of a breeze.

Thursday morning we waded, paddled, swam our way out to high ground and walked along the railroad tracks near my house. We walked for a couple miles to an overpass and a rescue boat brought us to higher ground and relative safety where we could get out of the city. I have some stories of that experience but will spare you folks a lot of the details. Suffice it to say, it was not nice and a lot of folks were panicking, others were just suffering with the oppressive heat and the most unsanitary conditions I've ever been exposed to.

That evening, my brother-in-law got a high ranking, good friend of his from the State Police to allow his son who evacuated 100 miles outside N.O. to come in with a Suburban. We packed everyone but the 2 ladies from across the street who disappeared once we hit high ground into that vehicle along with the animals. My legs fell asleep from the cramped conditions in minutes. We had 11 adults, 3 dogs, a cat and a hamster crowded into that vehicle, along with what we all carried out in personal papers and some clothing. It was a ride I will never forget if I live to be 100.

It wasn't until mid October until I saw my house again. Something else I'll never forget. My wife, daughter and I moved back in on January 1, 2006.

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rainbowgardener
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Amazing story.... thanks for sharing it!

tedln
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Gumbo,

Our daughter works for an emergency response group in Texas. She deploys to earthquakes, floods, and hurricanes; where ever the group is needed. While Katrina was still on top of New Orleans, she and her group were deployed to Houston where they waited for the first opportunity to deploy to New Orleans. They arrived at the New Orleans airport the next day and converted the airport into a triage unit to begin receiving victims.

The first helicopters started arriving that afternoon and began the evacuation. The first victims arrived at the triage unit that evening. They were evaluated for medical needs, treated, and moved inland by bus, or by airplane. The second day, the survival supplies began to arrive at the airport by giant transport planes. Every day, more helicopters, airplanes, and trucks arrived either carrying supplies in or people out. I have about 1500 photos of the ravages of Katrina taken by the people who came to help. Many of the photos, I will never show to anyone else because they show people in moments of desperation that would simply be unfair for anyone else to see. Others like a photo taken from the back of a helicopter looking down at the almost destroyed superdome with the roof missing or an aerial shot of a marina with all the big boats piled up in the parking lot are not so personal and I have shown them.

Our daughter spent three weeks in the airport eating "meals ready to eat" and sleeping on the floor in a sleeping bag.

A few months later, she deployed to Rita which took out much of the forest and a lot of homes near where we lived in East Texas.

Now, she is waiting to see if deployment orders come for Earl on the east coast.

Ted

gumbo2176
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Well, Ted, thank your daughter for me as one of the New Orleanians that truly appreciate all the things that were done by volunteers during that time. It seems all you ever hear about is the conditions folks at the Superdome and the Convention Center suffered through. Given, the conditions were deplorable, but it take time to get all the logistics together to mount that large a plan of rescue.

Like many of my fellow New Orleanians, I pulled my bootstraps up and got to work on my home as soon as I could get back into the city. I can understand older folks, sick folks needing help to get things done, but I know many folks that are able bodied that are still waiting for someone to do it for them. That really ticks me off.


I know a lot of the country is tired of hearing about Katrina, and truthfully, so am I. That was 5 years ago. I often want to tell those that are living like it was yesterday to get over it and get on with your life.


The only reason I posted about this was the fact it was the 5th anniversary and I had not related some of what I posted to many folks. Guess I was feeling a bit of De Je Vous.

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I read your post when you first posted... and just was in silent AWE. Still don't know what to say, but I wanted to acknowledge and salute your efforts. :)

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Thanks for posting, Gumbo. I didn't see this first time around, so thanks for bumping, Apple.

I was in the Keys for Andrew's approach. Did not experience anything like greater Miami's loss, or the even more catastrophic New Orleans' with Katrina, but Gumbo's story was distressing to read. Unfortunately, I do know the kinds of things people can do under duress, and I do know the great strength required to rise above the tide of desperation.

Gumbo, did the two old ladies return across the street?

And did the salt water flooding have lasting effect on soil conditions at your home?

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Thanks for posting Gumbo.
And don't worry about folks getting tired of hearing about Katrina.
It is refreshing to talk to folks who actually lived through it, and not just a second hand report.
I have other friends who left N.O. due to Katrina, and they were scattered throughout the country, and longing to go home. And many had not located all of their families in 2006 and even into 2007.

My "Katrina" came the morning we woke to our house engulfed in flames. It was extremely traumatic, and the anniversary always kicks back memories. It was amazing the number of strangers who arrived to help, to drop stuff off, to pack items into my car or truck.

A waitress at a local restaurant (just a greasy spoon) actually, gave us an entire household of items, that her deceased son had left, and she had in storage, and felt it was time to deal with his stuff. So she kept a few momentos and asked us to take the rest. We did, and we used what we could, and amazingly found other folks in need to pass some things on to.

I can't imagine, an entire area in the same situation at the same time... that would triple what we went through. I salute the survivors!

Isn't it amazing, how the human spirit can reach beyond what we think we can do, when in a situation where we have to?
I got my husband who was... almost unconscious, at least addled, out and he is alot too heavy for me to move, but somehow I did. I got the door open, that had just bounced him off when he tried to get it open...

And he heard the fire, even though his hearing aids were on the dresser, and ended up burning up, along with his glasses and billfold. He shouldn't have heard it and been able to wake me up... I am the ears at night! Just like he is the strong one for fighting with doors that won't open! And he could have carried me... our roles got reversed and we still survived!

We can all look back in awe at what the individual can actually manage to do in a situation. I think things like this even change your perspective on life in general.

I mean, you drive race cars, or scale high cliffs you know the risks... but at home in bed asleep, or even peacefully washing your dishes, you don't expect to be at risk, and life threatening drama to hit you there... but sometimes it does just that!

We need reminders sometimes, there are alot of things worse than Harlequin bugs eating our cabbages! Keep reminding us... to Count our Blessings... we made it!

gumbo2176
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thanrose wrote:Gumbo, did the two old ladies return across the street?
And did the salt water flooding have lasting effect on soil conditions at your home?

No, the two ladies from across the street, mother and daughter, were heading back to Las Vegas where they had lived for many years. Both were Casino dealers but the older lady had since quit due to health reasons while the younger continued the profession.

The salt water remaining for so long was one of the reasons it took me so long to plant a garden. I didn't know how much affect the water would have on the soil since my Japanese Plum, Satsuma and Sweet Olive trees all died as a result of the water. Funny thing is, my fig tree thrived and by the second year after the flood, it was thriving. Besides, a garden was way down on my list of priorities at that time. I had over 1600 sq.ft. of area on the first floor that needed total rebuilding.

I saw an article in the local paper about how lead levels in the soil actually went way down in the flooded areas and the fact I had one of the lushest lawns I've ever had within 2 years post flood convinced me to attempt a garden again.

I've had great results as long as the weather cooperates a bit. We had much rainfall this summer accompanied by brutal heat and humidity and last winter we had unusually cold temperatures for several days in a row, but the year before, my garden was really thriving. It is doing much better now with the new plants in the ground and I'm looking forward to a bountiful harvest.

gumbo2176
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[quote="gumbo2176"]Both were spam dealers but the older lady had since quit due to health reasons while the younger continued the profession.

I didn't type the word "spam" in this post but did put in the word "c asino". The powers that be must have thought it spam.

gumbo2176
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Ozark Lady, I spent over 20 yrs. as a professional firefighter for this city. I am fully aware of the situation you and your husband found yourselves in and from your post, it is amazing you weren't seriously injured or worse. My hat's off to you for your actions.

I am a strong advocate of the use of smoke detectors in the home. I currently have 7 of them between the two floors of my home. The only place I would never have one is directly in the kitchen but have one just outside the kitchen over the doorway in the adjacent room.

And you are so right about human kindness. When I finally got out of the city 4 days after the storm and got to my father-in-laws house in central La. many of the townspeople were going above and beyond in taking folks in, giving them clothes, food, and in some cases, even money to help out. The outpouring of volunteers once the city was finally opened for folks to return to assess the damages and begin repairs was truly inspiring.

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Ozark Lady
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The local firemen, had installed smoke detectors, but they kept going off, so we took out the batteries to shut them up. :oops:
The firemen were standing under firedetectors as they hosed the house!

And we have not replaced a single fire detector... in our new mobile we don't have even one! :oops:

The firemen couldn't believe that we were okay, our bedroom was totally destroyed within minutes of our leaving it.

The medics checked us out, and kept shaking their heads, that we were okay. Just dirty, dishevelled, and smelled of a burned house! Only injury was hubby, dove out the door and it didn't have steps, he landed head first, so he did get some scrapes on is face. No stitches or anything. He just suddenly came to life, when I got him to fresh air and dove right out, I couldn't stop him. And he wouldn't let go of me, so he jerked me out, before I could grab his glasses or anything.

Two weeks later I did come down with a sinus infection, imagine that!

cynthia_h
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People out here in the S.F. Bay Area were looking for ways to help the Katrina survivors even at this great distance. Fortunately, I'm a quilter, and as soon as the scope of the disaster (and the slow response from those who should have been in position to rush in) became clear, I began making quilts. About two or three days later, the Tuesday after Labor Day, my guild announced Katrina work days so that we could send quilts to Houston for distribution to the Katrina refugees housed in the arena there and other Katrina centers.

Nationwide, over 10,000 quilts were distributed to Katrina survivors by the end of calendar year 2005. Unfortunately, we did not reach our goal of one quilt per survivor; I'm not sure if we even made it to one quilt per family.

When the horrible situation of the pets became known (that poor boy who got physically sick when told he would have to leave his dog behind), the Marin Humane Society and others across the country organized Operation Pet Lift/Orphans of the Storm and airlifted thousands of dogs and cats who had been forcibly abandoned. I helped bathe and groom many of these dogs and cats. The mind boggles at describing their condition. New animals kept being rescued even two and three months later from abandoned houses and brought out here. (And, I'm sure, brought to other rescue centers.)

The bathers and groomers saw these animals before the veterinary crew did. We saw them before anyone else except the intake volunteers. We did our best to assure the pets that people would treat them well and feed them again. The cats were particularly traumatized, as any cat person can well imagine; the dogs were very wary and skittish, but those who had been well cared for originally recognized good care when they received it again and welcomed it. Poor things.... :(

The scope of Katrina goes far beyond the storm damage. I feel that it changed the way our nation responds to natural disaster so that no one else will ever have to suffer the way the Katrina people were left to suffer. I sincerely hope that's the case.

Cynthia H.

tedln
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Gumbo,

A few photos of what was going on! Click to enlarge the photo.

Super Dome!
[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/Katrina/FL_1603_NewOrleans001.jpg[/img]

After the helicopters discharged a load, they would take off for the next load.
[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/Katrina/FL_1603_D-MAT_282.jpg[/img]

The flightline, ready to take off for more.
[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/Katrina/FL_1603_D-MAT_187.jpg[/img]

In this photo, the chopper is off the ground and the pilot is hanging out the door talking with the flight coordinator.
[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/Katrina/FL_1603_D-MAT_122-1.jpg[/img]

Arriving to unload!
[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/Katrina/FL_1603_D-MAT_209.jpg[/img]

Loading the medical evacuation transports
[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/Katrina/FL_1603_D-MAT_203.jpg[/img]

Unloading new arrivals
[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/Katrina/FL_1603_D-MAT_197.jpg[/img]

Air Force One
[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/Katrina/FL_1603_D-MAT_193.jpg[/img]

Unloading stretcher patients
[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/Katrina/FL_1603_D-MAT_140.jpg[/img]

The Pilots and flight crews were working around the clock, taking naps between flights.
[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/Katrina/DSCF0356.jpg[/img]

Boats in the parking lot
[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/Katrina/DSC06191.jpg[/img]

Triage and surgery units constructed inside the airport
[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/Katrina/100_0074.jpg[/img]

New Orleans underwater
[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/Katrina/FL_1603_NewOrleans011.jpg[/img]

And the news media was reporting that no one was trying to help the survivors. Civilian volunteers, National guard, Military from all branches, were all there with more coming the first day after the storm, but it served a higher purpose to say the government wasn't responding.

Ted

gumbo2176
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[quote="tedln"]Gumbo,And the news media was reporting that no one was trying to help the survivors. Civilian volunteers, National guard, Military from all branches, were all there with more coming the first day after the storm, but it served a higher purpose to say the government wasn't responding.

This is so true. I witnessed military copters almost as soon as the waters in my neighborhood began to rise since the areas where the levee broke at the 17th St. Canal is within 3 miles of my house. In that immediate area, whole houses built on slabs were wiped away by the force of the water and it got significantly higher there than it did in my area.

Like I mentioned in an earlier post, the logistics to mount a search and rescue or airlifting all those folks is a monumental undertaking and doesn't just happen overnight.

tedln
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gumbo2176 wrote:
tedln wrote:Gumbo,And the news media was reporting that no one was trying to help the survivors. Civilian volunteers, National guard, Military from all branches, were all there with more coming the first day after the storm, but it served a higher purpose to say the government wasn't responding.

This is so true. I witnessed military copters almost as soon as the waters in my neighborhood began to rise since the areas where the levee broke at the 17th St. Canal is within 3 miles of my house. In that immediate area, whole houses built on slabs were wiped away by the force of the water and it got significantly higher there than it did in my area.

Like I mentioned in an earlier post, the logistics to mount a search and rescue or airlifting all those folks is a monumental undertaking and doesn't just happen overnight.
A common joke among the pilots went like this.

First pilot " My wife called me this morning wanting to know where I am. I told her I am in New Orleans rescuing people from their roofs and out of the water. She said I don't believe you because CBS, NBC, ABC, and CNN said you are not there helping those poor people. I want to know where you are and who you are with. I told her to check on Fox news. She said Fox is sending Geraldo Rivera down to do an expose on why the government hasn't sent anyone to help. Where are you? The news media wouldn't lie about a story this big.

Second Pilot "Did anyone say where we were at yesterday? I thought I was here yesterday also".

Here is a shot of a chopper taking off during the hurricane. Note the transport planes in the background.
[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/DSCF0882.jpg[/img]

The only people who were late getting there due to personal safety was the news media. It may have taken an extra day for them to coordinate how to spin the story. They couldn't let a tragedy go to waste without the right spin.

Ted

tedln
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Cynthia,

"When the horrible situation of the pets became known (that poor boy who got physically sick when told he would have to leave his dog behind), the Marin Humane Society and others across the country organized Operation Pet Lift/Orphans of the Storm and airlifted thousands of dogs and cats who had been forcibly abandoned. I helped bathe and groom many of these dogs and cats. The mind boggles at describing their condition. New animals kept being rescued even two and three months later from abandoned houses and brought out here. (And, I'm sure, brought to other rescue centers.) "

You can't believe everything you read and hear. At he same time the D-MAT people were rescuing and treating and transporting people, the V_MAT people were rescuing, treating, and transporting animals. The V stands for veterinary. The rescue vehicles were loading people and their pets from the water, bridges, and roofs. When they could, they went back in on foot and located and rescued as many as possible.

This photo is of my daughter holding a rescued puppy. The photo was taken almost three weeks into the rescue and most of the people had been rescued and transported out. She works with the D-MAT group but couldn't resist wandering over to the veterinary area to pet the puppies.
[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/Katrina%20Pets/FL_1603_V-MAT_018.jpg[/img]

The following photos speak for themselves. I only have about 200 more photos of animal rescues.
[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/Katrina%20Pets/FL_1603_V-MAT_023.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/Katrina%20Pets/FL_1603_V-MAT_016.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/Katrina%20Pets/FL_1603_V-MAT_009.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/Katrina%20Pets/FL_1603_V-MAT_008.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/Katrina%20Pets/FL_1603_V-MAT_001.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/Katrina%20Pets/FL_1603_USR_033.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/Katrina%20Pets/FL_1603_USR_032.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/Katrina%20Pets/FL_1603_USR_027.jpg[/img]

Ted

cynthia_h
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Yes, there were on-site animal rescues, but their facilities were soon over capacity. So there began a relay of animals whose owners (surprise! not! given the hit-and-miss communication available to regular people) couldn't be found to further-off shelters.

And, of course, the longer after the storm, the worse condition the animals were in, because they had had to be on their own for that much longer. Animals we have domesticated; in other words, bred over centuries to depend on us for water, food, and shelter. All of this was denied to them in an instant by human evacuation procedures.

Some people were able to drop off their pets, but only a low % of people, mostly those like us--with cars and computers both. Many other pets were rescued by the people you've photographed, who went out in boats on the streets "just in case" a pet had been missed or was in a house whining. (I've read too many first-person accounts to think that all of these cutie-pies were dropped off directly by their owners, and I bathed too many animals with toxic goo, advanced skin infections, and other "raw outdoor living" evidence on them as well.)

These animals suffered the loss of their homes and their people, just as that boy and other people were made to leave their animals behind because evac plans had no provisions for people's pets. Red Cross included. :x

This is the kind of suffering I hope will never be visited upon Americans again; the laws have been changed at the national level.

BTW, your photos are terrific; did you have any of them published in a local paper or other venue at the time?

Cynthia

tedln
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"This is the kind of suffering I hope will never be visited upon Americans again; the laws have been changed at the national level."


I don't know what kind of law can be passed at the national level that will keep a hurricane from hitting. If you mean a law to make people respond faster, it's kinda hard to respond on a massive scale while the hurricane is still there. Do you think as soon as the hurricane is over is not fast enough?

I apologize! That was a factitious statement, but the truth is the government wasn't as well prepared as they thought they were. They had no idea of the magnitude of what was about to happen. They also had no idea of how to prepare for a disaster like Katrina. They did learn and they have instituted measures for quick response for the next disaster. Since they learned from Katrina, they are probably prepared for an earth quake or another hurricane. It will probably be a nuclear device set off during a football game or Fourth of July celebration. We probably will not be prepared for that. Will more laws help?

Ted

tedln
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Cynthia,

People were not dropping their pets off to be taken care of. They were boarding the same helicopters, and boats their owners were boarding for rescue. As the owners were evaluated for need, so were the pets. In almost all cases, the pets were sent with their owners to temporary evacuation centers inland. Unfortunately many people simply had no interest in rescuing their pets. The V-MAT people started making sweeps of the area to locate abandoned pets as soon as they could. They started in boats and finished on foot.

I almost forgot, but thank you. I did not take the photos. They were taken by the people involved in the rescue at all levels. They traded photos from each others cameras before they went home. I started out with about three thousand photos and discarded about fifteen hundred because of quality or subject. I never enjoyed seeing the photos of American soldiers bodies washing up on the beach after some of the WWII battles. I didn't want to keep some of the Katrina victim photos for the same reason. To my knowledge none have ever been published nor to my knowledge have any been copyrighted.

Ted

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Wow, thanks for the incredible story, Gumbo. You are a real hero to those people who you fed and took with you in the SUV.

Ted, thanks for the fascinating pics.

cynthia_h
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tedln wrote:"This is the kind of suffering I hope will never be visited upon Americans again; the laws have been changed at the national level."


I don't know what kind of law can be passed at the national level that will keep a hurricane from hitting. ...

Ted
I wish. I went through a hurricane myself in Tampa, Florida, and the backwash from a few more.

The law I'm referring to was one that required relief agencies to include pets in their evacuation plans, that stated pets could not be separated from their people nor people from their pets.

If you figure out how to get hurricanes to change course (or if I do...ha ha), the New Englanders this weekend might appreciate it. *Hurricane Earl* (for people who find this thread in the future).

Gumbo has a hair-raising story and an inspirational one. I heard other hair-raising stories from New Orleans refugees who had kin in the Bay Area, some from St. Bernard Parish and some from New Orleans proper. For some of them, simply the act of surviving and discovering where other family members had ended up was a major feat, involving persistence, sleuthing skills, and (sometimes) sheer luck.

Before I moved out to California, I had been engaged to a Baton Rouge man, but I later learned that he hadn't survived Katrina by more than six weeks due to emotional devastation. I was pretty stunned to learn this, even though I'd known he was an emotionally wrought person; he lived in BR and not in NOLA.

You just can never tell what Mother Nature / Fate will throw at you, when, and how much, or who will come through or not. Do what you can to help those who are struck, and reach out for help when you are struck. Take needed preparation steps, to be sure, but some things are simply beyond preparation. Katrina was one of them.

Cynthia

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Joined: Thu Jun 25, 2009 6:06 pm
Location: North Texas

Cynthia,

Here are a few more photos I thought you would appreciate. I will upload some more Katrina photos, but not to this thread. The photos would simply overload the thread and Gumbo's story is simply to good to ruin the thread by making it impossible for people to load. I will start a new Katrina Photo thread.

[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/More%20Katrina/FL_1603_D-MAT_128.jpg[/img]

[img]https://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/More%20Katrina/FL_1603_D-MAT_212.jpg[/img]

Ted



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