StCatharine
Newly Registered
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 1:04 am

How does one start new roots from a cutting

Hello folks

I am trying to find specific instrustions for starting roots from a cutting. I recieved these roses as a gift and i would like to grow root from these stems. Is this possible and how do i achive this.

Thanks

grandpasrose
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1651
Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2005 4:21 pm
Location: Quesnel, BC, Canada - Zone 4a

Hi StCatharine!! Welcome to the forum.
I am assuming that you are referring to a bouquet of roses you have received?
A word of caution: Many roses are patented by the breeder to protect his/her investment of time (often many years) into the development of that particular rose, much the same as with prescription medications or anything else. Patented roses are protected by plant patent laws, and should not be reproduced by any means. However, many are not, and you probably don't even have any idea which rose variety yours are.

Because these are cut flower stems, you may or may not be successful propogating them as it depends on how fresh they are, and many other things. But it is certainly worth a try.

- First of all, trim the end off the cut flower, and let it stand in fresh water for several hours, to allow it to absorb as much moisture as possible. If it is quite dry, it will probably not work for you.
- Next, under water, trim the flower, and extra stem, until you have a piece of stem about four to six inches long, that has a few leaves left at the top(there must be leaves to continue gathering nutrients etc. while rooting), and three or four bud bumps along it. The preferred part of the stem is the softer wood (closer to the flowering end) and about as big around as a pencil.
- Once you have trimmed it, immediately wrap the cuttings in damp paper towel so that the ends do not get dry.
- Now, some rose gardeners simply stick these cuttings into the garden, tamp them down, and keep them watered. But if you are wanting more of a chance of success, slit the thin bark at the bottom of the stem vertically in several places with a very sharp razor or knife, and then use a rooting hormone.
- You can use two different rooting hormones depending on your preference. The first is dipping the damp, slit end of the cutting into a commercial rooting powder. The second is to leave the cuttings (slit ends down) overnight in water that has willow twigs steeping in it. If you use this method, when taking the cuttings out, allow the ends to callous over (dry a little) keeping the hormone inside. This method, although more organic, has not been proven in any scientific studies.
- Now put the cuttings into moist (not soggy) soil with at least one of the bud bumps along the stem under the soil. Put a glass container, or plastic bag over your plantings to maintain humidity, but do not allow it to get too damp, or fungus and rot will ensue.
- Place your cuttings in a bright, but not full sun, spot, and keep an eye on it to ensure it does not dry out.
- Your cuttings can take anywhere from six to twelve weeks to root, and as long as there is green on your cutting, there is hope.
- Once there is new foliage starting to grow, and the cutting resists when gently tugged, you can assume it is rooted, and you have your rose!!

I hope this helps,and you enjoy success.
Feel free to stop back with any questions or problems any time, and for sure let us know how it turns out! Good Luck! :wink:

Val

Deenagh Foster
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Aug 07, 2006 12:24 pm

Rose propagating

That was really interesting, Thank you

grandpasrose
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1651
Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2005 4:21 pm
Location: Quesnel, BC, Canada - Zone 4a

You are most welcome! Glad you found something in it for yourself! :wink:

Val
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)

Cactus Joe
Full Member
Posts: 16
Joined: Sat Sep 16, 2006 9:02 pm
Location: North West Pacific

Listen to Mel Hulse

The best article on rooting cuttings of roses, in my opinion, is the one by Mel Hulse ([url]https://www.ars.org/About_Roses/propagating-cuttings-hulse.htm[/url]). If you go to the American Rose Society website on rose propagation, you will be able to read the different methods employed by other rose eperts ([url]https://www.ars.org/About_Roses/propagation.htm[/url]).

Guest

cuttings

As far i know you can get cuttings from mini roses not hybrid ones to take the cuttings from mini roses you clip the new growth off dip them in rooting hormorn and put in perlite til roots form then pot them to to that you if you have a flat wooden box put potting soil in bottom about a2inches deep then pour perlite on top put the cutting one by one in the perlite and put in a greenhouse till rooted usualy takes 2or 3weks if you don't have a greenhouse place plastic over them hybrid roses are graphed to make more

Cactus Joe
Full Member
Posts: 16
Joined: Sat Sep 16, 2006 9:02 pm
Location: North West Pacific

Cuttings

You can root cuttings off any roses, hybrid teas included. Some roses are more stubborn in yielding roots than others. But it doesn't hold true that hybrid teas are more difficult to root. On the other hand, some hybrid teas may not be as vigorous or productive grown on own roots, and therefore, do better grafted. This will depend on the geographic in which you garden.

kevinschoppe
Cool Member
Posts: 90
Joined: Sun May 01, 2005 2:54 am
Location: Zone 8A Texas Gulf Coast

I have tried J&P's double decker tree rose. Basically it looks like they graphted new branchs into the middle of the trunk. The funny thing it the graphted portion is doing better (more buds & leaves) that the top portion has.

Newt
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1868
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 2:44 am
Location: Maryland zone 7

Kevin, if I understand you:
the graphted portion is doing better (more buds & leaves) that the top portion has
there are sprouts coming from below the grafted top portion on the rootstock. If that is so you need to remove the sprouts or it will take over and the top grafted portion will die out.

Newt

TheBip
Newly Registered
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2007 3:25 am
Location: Indianapolis, IN

grandpasrose, that is the most helpful guide to doing cuttings Ive seen! I can actually "see" what youre talking about (which is very helpful for me because Im a visual learner)! :D

Return to “Rose Forum”