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Ozark Lady
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Help! Fridge full of milk, yogurt, and buttermilk, no rennet

I have too much milk. I have too much homemade buttermilk. I have too much homemade yogurt.
I kept making the buttermilk and yogurt to make cheese with. But, I can't find any rennet locally. I did find Junket, not the same, but I got it anyhow.
I have to order rennet online, and wait for it to arrive.
In the meantime, I have to milk the goats... and do something with the milk, my freezer is full of fruits to get made into jelly, can't freeze any more yogurt or buttermilk... oh my goodness... too much of a good thing.

I need all recipes for using up milk, buttermilk, and yogurt.
Especially cheese recipes, since after draining them, I will have less mass. But, I don't have rennet. And how much lemon cheese can a person eat anyhow?

Goat milk is naturally homogenized, cream does not rise so great, so I do skim the cream and get a spoonful of cream daily for butter making...slow process so I freeze my cream jar, till I get it full.

Help... I need input!
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lorax
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You can make Queso Fresco with the cream and buttermilk - it's best with straight buttermilk, but you can also go 50-50 with regular milk for a lighter cheese. This is vinegar-clabbered cheese - use just enough vinegar that the curds begin to form, then drain, salt, and press into a cheese form. Fresh, it's better than Feta.

If you clabber with balsamic vinegar, cheddar the curds and hard-pack them, then wax the final product and age it for 6-8 months, you'll have Mild Amalattea. 12 months for Medium, and 24 for a sort of Romano-style hard cheese. I particularly like this with added cardamon seeds and rosemary, but Mild with black peppercorns is also quite appealing.

If you clabber with white wine vinegar, hot-stretch the curds, then ball or braid them, you have the goat's milk equivalent of Fior di Latti fresh mozarella.

You can also start sourdough slips with the buttermilk and a dash of yoghurt if you have a stoneware crock. Just toss a handful of flour in, and leave it in a warm place until you see the fermentation begin. Then, off to the fridge!

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applestar
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Didn't somebody say they pressure can milk into something that resembles evaporated milk? Was that LindsayArthur?

Lorax, you're full of amazing knowledge. :D There, see, it's that word again. :lol:

LindsayArthurRTR
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[url]https://www.motherearthnews.com/Real-Food/1984-05-01/Home-Canned-Milk.aspx[/url]

I don't think you can make cheese with it though, after you can it. I believe it makes it like ultra pasturized milk.
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Ozark Lady
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Acutally I have canned milk, and it isn't good for lots of uses. But still great for cooking applications.

I am freezing and dehydrating, trying my best to stay away from canning in the hottest months. I have a sink full of tomatoes from my son, washed and soon to go into the dehydrator, 3 buckets of elderberries to get washed and in the freezer, and a fridge full of milk and milk products to get outta my way. I may just have to crank up the a/c and go for it...

Cheese making does not require long times of lots of hot water going, since I don't pasteurize, I make raw milk products. I may pasteurize later batches, to get firmer curds.

Do you happen to have recipes Beth? I have made lemon cheese and vinegar cheese, these were both eaten as soft cheeses. I also made mozarella before, but I had rennet! :roll:

I ordered a cheese making book, but it hasn't arrived yet, either :evil:

Thanks for suggestiions, all help is appreciated... did I just get elderberry juice on keyboard... oh man! :oops:
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[url]https://extension.missouri.edu/publications/DisplayPub.aspx?P=G9550#procedure[/url]

Here are a couple of rennet free cheese recipes.
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lorax
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Recipes? Wow, I've been doing rennet-free cheeses for so long that I don't really use them anymore. Generally, I scald, clabber, drain, salt/add herbs, stretch or cheddar, and pack. I always salt to taste, so it's tough to give good proportions.

Hmmm. I generally adhere to the "1 pint to 1 quart" rule for Queso Fresco - this means 1 pint of cream or buttermilk to each 1 qt of straight milk. The vinegar is tough to gauge because the amount needed varies according to the fat content of the given batch of milk/cream. The higher the fat content, the more vinegar needed to give a good curd. It also seems to vary by altitude. For a 1 pt + 1 qt batch, I usually start with 1/4 cup. Needless to say, different types of vinegar give the cheese a different quality of flavour. For QF, I prefer a mild vinegar, like apple cider, rice, cane, or pale white wine.

For the Amalattea, use full buttermilk (no plain milk at all) for the richest results. Traditionally, this is clabbered with Modena balsamic vinegar; I've also made very tasty versions using sherry brandy vinegar and black malt vinegar. Cheddaring the curds during the salting process involves chopping them fairly fine with a dull knife, then repacking into a mass with your hands to chop again. It refines the texture of the cheese, making it firmer and crumblier. Amalattea can be eaten fresh (at which point it's quite sweet) or waxed and aged, which sharpens it. To wax, take a formed block of the cheese and dip it quickly into 50-50 beeswax and food-grade parrafin, then allow that to set on wax paper before dipping again (do this 5-6 times). I tint my wax with a bit of crayola crayon, which helps me to track which batches are which, and gauge which ones are meant to be opened when. Age in a cool, dark place.

The Fior di Latti is made with more milk and less buttermilk or cream and clabbered with the mildest vinegar you can find. Once the curds have formed, drain them, work in the salt (not very much though - this is meant to be a sweeter cheese) then cover with almost boiling water, and press and stretch them until you have a uniform mass, then shape into balls or braids. If you're not going to eat them right away, pack them under their own whey to preserve them - Fior di Latti goes off rather quickly in open air.

And I found an actuall honest to goodness yogurt cheese recipe while I was looking for the base recipes for the vinegar cheeses.

Chura - Tibetan Yogurt Cheese.

1 gal. whole milk
1 C yogurt or 1/2C each yogurt and buttermilk.

Mix well, then pour into a deep cast-iron frypan, and bring to a boil - this will separate the curds from the whey. Keep boiling until you've reduced the liquid away and the curds are golden yellow. Remove the curds to a wooden board, cover with a cheesecloth tent, and place in the sunlight to dry a bit, turning occasionally until it's evenly dry. Store in a cool dark place in mason jars. This is a mild, sweet cheese and excellent in soups.

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Ozark Lady
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Thanks, I saved those recipes.
It uses junket, and I have a brand new box of that.
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Check [url=https://books.google.com/books?id=FDSTNokS6qEC&pg=PA18&lpg=PA18&dq=recipes+using+Lady's+Bedstraw+to+curdle+milk+for+cheese&source=bl&ots=N7yUWIOPTD&sig=MZv-yVT-tPzC-_ZDllSLYgqdz0E&hl=en&ei=xsFMTO68C5LWtQPu0JlJ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5&ved=0CCgQ6AEwBA#v=onepage&q&f=false]this Google Books link[/url].

It has a list of plants that can be used in place of rennet to curdle cheese.
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Ozark Lady
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That is the book that is somewhere enroute to me! But it is cheaper on your link :cry: Oh well, too late already paid for.
I am haunting the post office looking for it!

But, looks like folks gave me some excellent ideas, I can surely clear some of this out... I just need to get faster at moving it out, than my goats are at sending it in!

They are at almost 3 months fresh, so haven't even hit their high point as of yet. It will get worse! So I really do need to get my recipes lined up.

My hubby has a small hobby frig, we are going to install it in the kitchen for a cheese curing frig!

I like the colored wax idea to identify the cheese.

I am only at 1500-1800 feet, so not nearly as high as you are, Beth.
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I sure do wish I take some of that off your hands :()
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Ozark Lady
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I wish you could too! :lol:
Especially right now with the garden and the fruits getting ripe too!

I have folks wanting to buy goat milk and goat milk products, but I am not a grade A dairy, so it is illegal to sell it at all. But, if you were close enough, you could come visit, and milk out your own milk... that would be legal! Tee hee
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LindsayArthurRTR
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It's a shame we don't live closer! I think we would get along swell! :wink:

Maybe you could barter?
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lorax
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Yeah, my Canadian friends often joke that I live where only small planes fly in Canada. And I'm not even in the highest-altitude inhabited area of the country! I have friends who live in the Kiss the Sky pass, which is closer to 16,000 feet! (They grow potatoes, and not much else.)

From what I've observed, you'll probably need slightly more vinegar than I use - it has to do with the different scald-points and the behaviour of cream at different altitudes.

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What was your outcome?
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Ozark Lady
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Funny you asked, I just walked out of the kitchen from dealing with milk!

The buttermilk and lemon juice made it too acid, and it wouldn't even make curds! It just didn't work at all.

[img]https://i728.photobucket.com/albums/ww281/Ozark_Lady/100_2779_phixr.jpg[/img]

I found out when it is too acid the curds can't stick together, and you get this odd looking mess. I used 1 quart of buttermilk to a gallon of whole milk. And heated it to 175, then added 1/4 cup of lemon juice, and that caused the graining, and was too much. Those portions might have worked with cow's milk, or with less acidic buttermilk. Most folks are not dealing with raw buttermilk.

So I threw it out.
At this moment, I have 3 (2 quart) tubs of flavored yogurt, thickening up in the fridge, 2 (2 quart) tubs of yogurt culturing, 1 (2 quart) tub of buttermilk and 1 quart of buttermilk culturing, I have about 2 gallons of milk on the stove ripening. I will make it without the lemon juice this time. (Editted to add: and 2 pints of cream thawing out to make butter)

And several quarts of yogurt and buttermilk still in the fridge.
And only 1 gallon of fresh milk.

I just wormed the goats today, so for a week, I will be feeding all milk to the dogs. Kind of good, it will give me a chance to clean out the fridge!
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Hey, I remember you were asking for ideas on what to do with the wormed goats' milk. Feeding it to the dogs seems to serve a double-purpose. Great idea. I guess you can feed them to any other omnivorous and carnivorous pets and animals that would take milk, like cats and pigs, that also might (well actually they all do, don't they?) have GI pest issues. (Would that also be effective for intra- ... or is that inter- ... muscular and vascular worms too?)

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Ozark Lady
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Actually so little wormer is passed in milk, it won't help the dogs.

Unfortunately, strongyles (sp?) are present in both and do pass in the milk. Hence, if you feed raw milk to dogs, you must worm them religiously or have wormy sick, anemic animals. Humans are not a host animal, so no we can't get them.

I used Ivomech which is actually used on humans, so we could use it for fresh drinking. But, I also have them on Sulfa meds to get rid of any coccidiosis that might have taken up residence in the goats. Coccidia will destroy an animals liver, so I really don't need that! I also have the dogs and chickens on Coccidiosis meds, this week... I figure when messing with them, do them all! Tee hee

Pests are very debilitating to all animals, so one must stay after them.

My cheese making book arrived. I now have 2 orders of cheesemaking supplies enroute, one due to arrive on the 3rd, not sure on the other.

And I ordered a replacement copy of Herbal Handbook for Farm and Stable... I love that book.

And it will tell me safer herbs to use in worming my animals and about my hedgerow. And then, as soon as I find a microscope, I will do my own fecals and can then tell if I am getting the pests or not!

If organic is my goal... what am I doing using pesicides on my animals?
I am using DE also as a back up to help minimize the vermin load, but I don't think it is getting them all, the animals are showing anemia.

They are basically healthy, just eyelids aren't the right color! Kind of like pale gums in dogs. I am reacting before they get sick, while they are fat, shiny, active, and doing well.
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Ozark Lady
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Cheese is setting.
But, we have Butter!
Ingredients: Cream skimmed off of milk, and stored in freezer until I had enough on hand to make butter.
Just put the cream in a canning jar, quart sized, and used one blade of the mixer, kept all the splatters in the jar!

Here the butter is being washed, that is water added to wash away milk residue..
[img]https://i728.photobucket.com/albums/ww281/Ozark_Lady/100_2786_phixr.jpg[/img]

Water drained, and salt added.

And sample time:

[img]https://i728.photobucket.com/albums/ww281/Ozark_Lady/100_2787_phixr.jpg[/img]

I know, you expect butter to be yellow... cow cream has yellow tones, goat milk does not have yellow in cheese or butter.
But it tastes like: butter... just butter.
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Very Easy Buttermilk Cheese Recipe

I stumbled upon this buttermilk cheese recipe online. It couldn't be easier. Just pour buttermilk in a glass dish, let it sit in a warm oven 'til it separates, pour it into a cheesecloth lined colander, squeeze it a bit and it's cheese. It was particularly delicious with strawberry preserves on bagels or toast.

[url]https://www.jewishfood-list.com/recipes/chs/buttermilkchs01.html[/url]
Kerry

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