imac
Newly Registered
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Jul 18, 2010 3:55 pm
Location: west yorks

Cabbages

I have a very small garden. The cabbages we have planted have enormous leaves that are covering all spaces and plants. What happens if I tie them up over the heart of the plant. How much does removing leaves reduce the final cabbage production. Any other thoughts?
I am interested in maximising the effectiveness a small garden

User avatar
jal_ut
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 7480
Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2009 3:20 am
Location: Northern Utah Zone 5

The cabbage plants need those leaves if they are to produce the large head they are capable of producing. You can remove them at the expense of production. Same goes for tieing them up.

Cabbage plants do get huge. One needs to give them the needed room to grow and expand on the day of planting. I know its hard to look at that little 3 inch plant in a pot and imagine it growing to 3 feet or more wide.

At this point, its a trade off. You decide.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27981
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Depending on how many you have planted, I suppose one option would be to "harvest" every other one. Sometimes, young leaves can be eaten. If nothing else, they could be used for the "stock pot."

I would CUT them at ground level rather than uprooting them, so as not to disturb the roots of the ones you are keeping.

gumbo2176
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 3065
Joined: Mon Jul 19, 2010 6:01 am
Location: New Orleans

cabbages

My urban backyard garden is approximately 900 sq. ft. and I generally don't plant things that are "one and done" like cabbages, cauliflower, etc. since they do take up a good bit of space to grow properly. Besides, when these crops do well in my area, the stores and roadside stands are lousy with them at relatively cheap prices-== such as cabbage for about $.25 to .35 a lb. and a nice cauliflower can be had for $2 or less.

I tend to stick with plants that will produce through the season. Broccoli is one of my favorites since it sends up side shoots once the main head is picked. Brussell sprouts find a place in my garden since they don't require the room of a cabbage or cauliflower and you can pick off the sprouts as they mature on the stem. Collard and mustard greens are a favorite too and the ladies where my wife works really enjoy the way I smother them down with seasonings and salt pork for a great side dish.

Come on cool weather!!!!

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27981
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

The fun in cut and gones, in addition to the harvest itself, is that you can start/plant something else in that space and watch it grow. :wink:

Right now, I'm starting to plant, and plan the rest of, my fall garden. I planted some fall peas where the cabbages used to be, although I had earmarked that space for the Delicata and Pie Pumpkin to grow into (and they still may), and I keep thinking "...and if the Yellow Squash suddenly starts to decline, I could plant XYZ there 8) " Terrible but true. :lol:

Return to “Vegetable Gardening Forum”