futurebotanist90
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very curious about making a hybrid?

i've read in a few places that you can have two parent plants and make them pollenate and get a different plant from the seeds it produces? now I'm going to be planting some variety of pepper soon and would like to take two different pepper plants and make them pollenate so i can have a hybrid seed to grow later...is this possible? and if so how? can other edible plants do this as well? thanks for your time :)
"there is no ending, without a begining."

futurebotanist90
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Joined: Wed Jul 07, 2010 5:37 am
Location: san diego CA

sooo nobody wants to help? i see people looking at this.....
"there is no ending, without a begining."

thanrose
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This is less of a botany forum than it is a gardener's forum.

Yes, you can cross pepper plants. Cucurbits are even easier. Corn will cross easily too. It takes dedication, and usually isolation, and rigorous documentation if you really want someone else to care about your results. I know there are books in your school library that will give you the fundamentals, and maybe outline some experiments you could do.

https://www.ubcbotanicalgarden.org/forums/index.php is the website of the University of British Columbia's Botanical Gardens forum. It's the most technical of fora that I've seen. I'm sure there are some lists and BBS that are more specific to botanical research. Through UBC's fora, I've learned of citrus, palm, aroid, and gesneriad societies where people do actually cross breed and report.

There, as here, you are less likely to get a response to a nebulous question. From how you name yourself to what you ask there is a disparity. A botanist wannabe would probably already know the basics, so people here might be reluctant to spell out what they know. OTOH, other botanists here and elsewhere would be reluctant to detail higher level applied science. Honestly, I've "met" people who do gene splicing of plants.

I've deduced that you are between 10 and 15 years of age, and not in an expensive academy. You might be a fast track student without a lot of academic guidance.

If you get no other replies here, try a more specific question as in, "Crossing peppers? Anyone?"

If you go to UBC, identify yourself as a student learning on your own. Expect to be directed to other sites rather than have someone walk you through it. UBC is not as conversational as this forum. It's just a different strokes kinda thing.
Last edited by thanrose on Thu Jul 08, 2010 2:48 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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applestar
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Read [url=https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=148867#148867]this excellent post by TZ[/url] about tomato pollination. Since peppers are in the same family, you can see that peppers can self pollinate rather easily. There is a specific technique to intentionally cross pollinating them. I think TZ *might* have posted a brief description at some time in the past. You can try looking for it using "Search the Forum" in the link bar above. (TZ is short for "TZ -OH6")

You could probably find more info by following thanrose's research instructions. Also, I have a book called Seed to Seed which I seem to remember contains a description of the process -- perhaps you can find the book at your local library. It's a good read in any case, as the book contains instructions for saving seeds of different vegetables from year to year.

You can create one-time random hybrids this way, but a stable hybrid that turns out the same each time (such as for seeds of hybrid vegetables that you buy) are created over several generations. Someone posted details of that recently.

It IS fascinating, isn't it? Good luck. For your first try, you might have better luck with plants that have large separate male and female flowers, such as squash and pumpkins, that are easier to isolate and handle.

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morningglorygarden
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Re: very curious about making a hybrid?

futurebotanist90 wrote:i've read in a few places that you can have two parent plants and make them pollenate and get a different plant from the seeds it produces? now I'm going to be planting some variety of pepper soon and would like to take two different pepper plants and make them pollenate so i can have a hybrid seed to grow later...is this possible? and if so how? can other edible plants do this as well? thanks for your time :)
Sure why not? :D

I`m not a pepper expert but I`m curious what kinds of peppers do you want to cross if you don`t mind telling? You can enjoy your own little experiments on your own backyard. I enjoy crossing morning glories myself and have experienced a great deal of success as long as the species are compatible. For example Ipomoea nil and Ipomoea purpurea are morning glories of two different species and will not cross. So I must cross two ipomoea nils or two ipomoea purpureas to get seeds. Karen
Lake Mary Gardens

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