hexgrid
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Is there any hope for this tree?

Hi, I'm new to bonsai trees.

I was attempting to repot a Hawaiian Umbrella tree suffering from (I think) root rot. While rinsing away the soil from the roots, all of the bark around the base of the truck (which was soft, peeling, and mushy underneath) washed off the tree as easily as the soil in the roots.

You can see what's left in the image. Is there any hope for this tree? Would repotting be a waste of time? Farther up the trunk, it's still green beneath the bark.

[img]https://pixelgirlpresents.com/images/peeled_bark.jpg[/img]

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Gnome
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hexgrid,

The way I see it you have two options. Take cuttings now before the plant withers away or try to layer it.

You could cut cleanly through the bark and re-pot with rooting hormone and Sphagnum Moss as I have done here. Make sure to go to the next page to see the possible results.

https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=40359#40359

In the meantime, I hope you have kept the root-ball from drying out.

Norm

hexgrid
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Thanks for the advice. I'm going to attempt layering.

If it doesn't work, it's not a huge loss with this tree, and at least I'll get some experience with the technique.

Victrinia Ridgeway
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This tree has suffered bad damage from root rot, all the way to the collar. So there is no life in those roots at all. You'd do best to treat it as a big cutting... and saw off the infected area (dispose of it away from any other plants)... and apply some rooting hormone and put it in a light mixture of perlite and some composted bark or even just soil... but mostly perlight to keep it light.

Do NOT reuse any of the soil that was in with that plant... like the roots it needs to be thrown out. Or you'll infect other trees with the fungus spores.

If it lives... then you'll want to eventually make sure it stays in a very well draining soil and treat it with fungicide after some time to make sure it isn't infected still... also you'll want to make sure you wash your hands and tools from touching this plant to any other. The fungus that causes root rot needs wet poorly draining conditions and warmth. It is opportunistic in that it will lay in wait for the optimum conditions before flourishing... and spreading. If you water by dunking, you'll spread it from tree to tree... which is one reason I am against this form of watering.

Cuttings from high up in the tree would have less chance of being infected. The spores may be on the bark down close to the soil line... so keep that in mind if you decide to treat it as a big cutting.

Good luck!

Kindest regards,

Victrinia
La belle cose prendono tempo... (Beautiful things take time...)

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hexgrid,

In retrospect, Victrinia is almost certainly correct. So, trying to root a cutting/s would seem to be your only real option, sorry for the confusion.

Norm

hexgrid
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Okay, that makes sense. Thanks.

I was assuming that I had damaged the tree by over-watering. I hadn't considered the idea that this was a spreadable infection. That's a scary thought. Until recently, the tree has been in close proximity to three other trees (which are all doing fine so far.)

Victrinia Ridgeway
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You would only really spread it to them if you dunked them all together, or worked with tools contaminated by the one on the others. And even then... if the soil is properly draining in the others it could never become a problem... as I said it requires the opportune enviornment to become a real problem.

Good luck with it...

Victrinia
La belle cose prendono tempo... (Beautiful things take time...)

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IndorBonsai
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Long Fiber Sphagnum Moss !!

,, NOT, and I Mean not peat moss.

Long fiber sphagnum moss can be purchased from almost any store ( Lowes, Home Depot, Pet stores )

Long fiber Sphagnum moss has antiseptic properties for roots , no root rot and it actually helps promote root growth. Almost any cutting you stick in Long fiber Sphagnum moss will grow without using any chemicals.

All you have to do is keep it watered and you don't have to worry about over watering any more.
If your going to have art in your house why not make it living art. :D

Jason

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