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microcollie
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Need an ID for the perfect plant -- Lunaria rediviva

[img]https://i964.photobucket.com/albums/ae129/microcollie/IMG_0522.jpg[/img]
Could use some ID help. I bought this 4-5 years ago. It was labled as amsonia, but I'm pretty sure that's wrong.
It's about 4 feet tall, one of the first things up in the spring in my western MA zone 4 garden. It blooms heavily from very early spring through early summer, when I deadhead it, then it blooms sporadically for the rest of the summer (Amazing!) The flowers open pink and fade to a blue/lavender, leaving behind the seedpods in the picture. If not deadheaded, it self sows readily. Roots are tough and woody, and leaves are notched and slightly textured. Slugs and other pests don't seem to like it. All in all, it's perfect, except I don't know its name.

The Helpful Gardener
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I'm sorry but I'm a bit stumped

I was thinking Lunaria biennis (which can be really invasive), but it's not quite right... the flower color is more purple usually... but the pods look right...

:?:

I'm thinking lunaria for now, which makes me think your opinion of perfection will change in a few more years... :wink:

Any other takers?

HG
Scott Reil

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Kisal
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I think you've nailed it, HG. :)

I think the flowers in the OP's pic are recently opened, so are still pale. The leaves and pods are absolute matches. 8)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

bullthistle
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Neither one of you indicated that it is a biennial so it could disappear anytime just like a columbine, depending on weather conditions. Actually I did some research myself because it looked attractive and never came across it but it's not the flowers that interest people but the seed pods that are used in arrangements.

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Ummm... yeah it's biennial, but that makes it sound like it might disappear from your garden and believe me (and my two neighbors that are swamped with this stuff) THAT won't happen. This one can get a little rambunctioius; be prepared to haul out a lot of it in spring to keep it managed...

HG
Scott Reil

bullthistle
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It is good to know that the plant rambles but my columbine came up short this year and we had plenty of rain over the winter after beautiful blooms last spring so it all depends on the weather because this spring was tough with varying degree fluctuations. If I ever get to build this plant will grow and flourish to its heart content and then I'll find out if deer like it as much as they do grape hyacinths.

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microcollie
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Eureka!! You've led me to the answer...Lunaria rediviva. It's a perennial form of the lunaria that several of you mentioned and, from my experience, a better-mannered one. Thanks to all for your help

The Helpful Gardener
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Ahhh, a better mannered lunaria sounds interesting...

Glad we could help (sort of... :? )

HG
Scott Reil

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Lunaria redivia

It is a Lunaria but it is a perennial called Lunaria redivia, it has eliptical pods rather than the biennial that are more roundish. It's very cool and I have not seen it in years. I used to grow it for it's eliptical pods. I would love some seeds if it is possible to do that here. Cheryl
"Flowers are a Gift, Plant Some" www.mypetalpress.com

mypetalpress
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Lunaria rediviva (sp)

I looked it up and I had spelled it wrong, it has an extra v. Cheryl
"Flowers are a Gift, Plant Some" www.mypetalpress.com

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microcollie
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Finally! Someone who agrees with my opinion of this plant. I've done some reading about the other varieties, and agree that they might not be the best, but this perennial variety really is a great plant. I sent you a private message about seed sharing. I'm also pretty new at this, so I hope I did it right.

mypetalpress
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nice fragrance too

Oh, for some reason I missed that you already had the answer. Anyway it is pink and unlike the biennial that is purplish it is also fragrant, a bonus. Thanks I would love some seeds when they mature, I replied to your private e-mail. Cheryl
"Flowers are a Gift, Plant Some" www.mypetalpress.com

The Helpful Gardener
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First I apologize for the misidentification; I was unaware of the existence of a more refined and garden worthy species from that genus. Every day here is an education in something... :oops:

Secondly a perennial variety sounds much more reliable and not as seedy and that's great. I will be sure to mention this the next time I am poo pooing L. biennis...

HG
Scott Reil

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Got my seeds

Thanks so much for the seeds, I can't wait to plant them, I love this plant.
Cheryl
"Flowers are a Gift, Plant Some" www.mypetalpress.com

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microcollie
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Certainly. Happy gardening!

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