MrBeans
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Jun 02, 2010 9:36 pm

Busting fertilized sod, and planting vegetables in soil?

Hello,

Approximately 2 months ago my lawn was treated with a liquid spray, Fertilome weed killer, to eradicate Creeping Charlie (ground ivy). About 3 weeks ago my lawn was then treated with Scott's Fertilizer/Weed Control.

I have recently decided I want to turn over/remove a section of the sod in order to plant a vegetable garden. I plan on incorporating a healthy amount of growing soil from the garden center.

My questions are:

1) Do you think the plants will grow given the chemicals that were dispensed in the area?

2) If the plants grow, do you think their fruits will be safe to eat?

Thanks for any help!

hit or miss
Green Thumb
Posts: 354
Joined: Sun May 30, 2010 8:57 pm
Location: central Kansas

I would think they will grow unless part of the chemical was a pre-emergent for broadleaf weeds.

I would also suspect that the veges will be as safe as anything you buy in the grocery, grown all over the world.

TZ -OH6
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 2097
Joined: Fri Jul 25, 2008 11:27 pm
Location: Mid Ohio

The herbicides in weed and feed lawn products are often a cocktail of three different chemicals. One breaks down fairly quickly in the soil (weeks), but the other two last for months in order to control weeds in the lawn for the whole season, so I would be surprised if vegetables grew normally this year. If vegetables grow normally you have nothing to fear from the herbicides.


I would start to prep the soil (til, ammend etc) this year because it will speed up the breakdown of the herbicides and give you more time to kill off the grass/weeds.

MrBeans
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Jun 02, 2010 9:36 pm

Thanks so much for the responses!

I think I'll give planting the veggies a shot.

It will only be approximately $15 lost if they don't grow anyway... :roll:

garden5
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 3062
Joined: Fri Aug 07, 2009 9:40 pm
Location: ohio

Welcome to the Helpful Gardener, Mr. Beans!

In addition to working the soil to speed up the decomposition of the chemical compounds, I'd also suggest that you add in some compost (if you have any) or some fresh top-soil and make a raised bed. This will really help to mitigate the effects of the weed-killers.
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