kappadoce
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Small Space for A Tree or Shrub

Hello -

I have a patch of dirt/rock that is 2' X 3' in front of my home. It is surrounded by sidewalk and concrete. I was thinking of excavating the rock and putting good soil and then planting an arbor vitae or something else.

Would it be viable for the arborvitae to survive in that small of a space? Do you have any other recommendations for a space this size (I do not want to pour cement, I want some life in this small area!

Thank you in advance!

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Kisal
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What kind of light exposure does the spot receive, and is the drainage good or poor? Do you especially want a tall plant, such as the arborvitae you mentioned, or would you like something that blooms?

If you were to post a photo, it might help give our members some ideas, too. :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

kappadoce
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The spot gets full sun from 8am-3pm. Not sure about the drainage, it is a very slight slope. I would prefer something taller.
I will take a picture tonight and post tomorrow morning.

Thank you for the input!

bullthistle
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Location: North Carolina

I beleive an arborvitae would get too large for that area and you'd be trimming it back and after it would would look out of place. Drainage would be a problem since the surrounding footings wouldn't allow water to drain. If you want to put in something tall that wouldn't block passage depending on your zone I would plant a deciduous tree like a redbud or a dwarf Japanes Maple that could be shaped for the space versus something that would need annual shearing. Or if you wanted an evergreen a Dwarf Alberta spruce which take years to fill in the space. In planting you may have to raise the plant higher then the concrete so water didn't sit in the hole and drown the plant. Or visit a nursery that has expaliered plants, like say a juniper.

MaineDesigner
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Location: Midcoast Maine, Zone 5b

Where are you located? 2 x 3 feet would probably preclude just about any woody plant. If the drainage is good maybe a miniature conifer would work but I think the spot is better suited to herbaceous plants.

kappadoce
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Thank you all for the replies. I am located in Pennsylvania. Below are pictures of the space:

[img]https://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f250/ngh101/DSC034971.jpg[/img]

[img]https://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f250/ngh101/DSC034961.jpg[/img]

bullthistle
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Location: North Carolina

As I indicated a Dwf. alberta spruce would be fine anything else would get too big.

MaineDesigner
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Location: Midcoast Maine, Zone 5b

Dwarf Alberta Spruce grow slowly but they do grow 2" - 5" per year in my experience ('Conica' the most common selection). Give them a decade and that 3' purchase turns into a 6' and growing problem.
[url]https://www.gardenrant.com/.shared/image.html?/photos/uncategorized/2008/05/30/alberta_spruce.jpg[/url]
There is also the issue of probable unsightly needle loss on the house side from too much shade.

kappadoce
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Do you think I would be better off planting a rose bush, or something like that? Any other suggestions?

Thank you!

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