RuHappy69
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Location: NorthWest NJ

ok Back to the beginning

Seeds not working very well. They are stunted at like an inch and a half in their littel starter pots.. So, I cheated and went to a local nursury and bought a mixed flat of Basil, Eggplant, Squash, snap Peas and red and green peppers. My space is small and the flat only cost me $13 and the plants are already a good 6-8 inches high and healthy. Although I did buy more string bean seeds today and planted one intermixed with each of the others (I think they will recover from their frost experience) - see who produces the most. I just wish the weather will cooperate.

Tomorrow I will hit a bigger nursery to see what other stuff I can buy and plant. Sofar I have:
Onions, Garlic, Basil, Parsley, Eggplant, Squash, Tomatoes, sting beans (hopefully) Cucumbers (hopefully - also direct seeds), Broccoli, snap peas, strawberries (topsy turvey thingie).. Any other ideas?

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supagirl277
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Do the topsy turvy things come with some seeds?? or do you have to get the plant? what point is there to sell seperate tomatoe strawberry and pepper holders when they don't come with any seeds or stuff
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RuHappy69
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Posts: 129
Joined: Wed Apr 14, 2010 6:17 pm
Location: NorthWest NJ

Had to buy the stuff

It was like $13 but I bought the strawberry plants (too many I think) + dirt.. However, they will last 3-4 years so it should be worth it.

garden5
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You can make those strawberry plants last longer by taking the runners, pinning them to the ground, and then taking the new plants that are produced by the runners and planting them.
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DoubleDogFarm
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They are stunted at like an inch and a half in their littel starter pots
I'm curious, did you compare your seed starting setup to the commercial starts. Pot size, soil type. It's hard to know what fertilizer they used, but sometimes you can see little green and white granules. I find that most beginners use way to small of containers and way to rich of soil - fertilizer.

RuHappy69
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Joined: Wed Apr 14, 2010 6:17 pm
Location: NorthWest NJ

no, never did

who knows, just frustrated. seedings litterally stopped growing even after thinning. Bought some great stuff yesterday at a huge nursery so i'll plant today

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rainbowgardener
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You said "starter pots." Were those the peat pots? They are seedling killers. Hold too much water, then if they finally do start drying out, they suck water away from the seedlings. If you try the seed starting again next year use plastic pots (can be plastic drink cups or whatever, as long as you put drainage holes in).
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Timlin
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Last year my tomato seedlings didn't grow. they just sat there and I was so frustrated because I've grown my own for 20 years and never had a problem. Finally one day I used a white coloured container to lift water from the drum I have for watering my seedlings and was shocked to see the water was a blue colour.

I called my nudder half and found out a big favour had been done for me. When the drum was filled nudder put fertilizer into it!!!!!!

I stopped using the water from the drum to water the seedlings and low and behold didn't they grow happily from then on. I found it in time to be able to use my own seedlings but the summer was so cold and wet I didn't get many tomatoes from them anyway.

You really cannot fertilize seedlings until they grow to a good size and then you need to use 1/2 strength or less for a bit.

RuHappy69
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Location: NorthWest NJ

Our Town has a community garden

So I'll try to donate them if anyone things they can give them a real shot. I'd hate to just toss them. Next year maybe I try again and do the following:

1. No more peat pots
2. bigger 'pots' with drainage holes
3. No dome over the plants
4. starter soil - minimal nutrients
5. start seedlings earlier

DoubleDogFarm
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:wink: :D

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