uniqorn
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Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Jun 22, 2006 2:53 pm
Location: Apex, North Carolina, USA

Overwatered, Abused American Redbud -- Can it be saved?

Hi, I'm new to the forum, but I've been keeping an eye on everyone's valuable advise on so many topics.

I, sadly, in my rush to add new trees to my brand-new property, did not properly care for my new American Redbuds after planting them in April. I had heard that newly planted trees needed to be watered everyday through the growing season so that they will establish (where did I pick that up?). So to make a long story short, one of my trees is now overwatered and has curled up, yellowed, and dry leaves. :oops:

Poor thing. I am fairly certain that I did not plant it too deeply, but I do know that beyond a foot and a half radius around the tree where I amended the soil for the tree, the soil is hardpan clay (I do live in North Carolina). Thus, I am also certain that the water drowned out the tree... now that I've done some research. :roll:

I read the thread about someone's mandarin orange trees being overwatered and the recommended idea was to dig it up, check for root rot, and then replant it, making sure the ground/area was dry.

Does anyone think that this will work for my redbud tree? It may not be dead yet, and I desperately want to save it!

Thanks for any advice you can give!

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Grey
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Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2005 12:42 am
Location: Summerville, GA, Zone 7a

Well, you can try it.

It might be okay too to just wait and see if the tree recovers. Depends upon how badly it was overwatered.

uniqorn
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Jun 22, 2006 2:53 pm
Location: Apex, North Carolina, USA

Follow-up: My tree did die, or at least it looks dead (all leaves browned up). We had a couple more days of really hard rains, and I decided to leave it where it was.

Future trees in my yard will have better prepared soil ahead of time!

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Grey
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Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2005 12:42 am
Location: Summerville, GA, Zone 7a

I am sorry about your tree. :(

decam0
Senior Member
Posts: 142
Joined: Sat Jun 24, 2006 4:03 pm
Location: London, England

One way to check whether a tree or shrub is dead is to gently scrape at some young bark on the trunk or on a branch with a fingernail. If the flesh underneath the outer skin is green, then it's still alive. If it's brown or beige then it's dead. Then you go get another one!
Delia

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