Greenhorn
Full Member
Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 9:10 am
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio

Need Help Identifying Tomato Leaf Condition

Need Help Identifying Tomato Leaf Condition

I'm a little paranoid after the last couple of years I've seen to have some problem with diseases. This year I tried to start tomatoes from seed but my results were not too good because of space limitations, my lack of knowledge and not using enough light early enough. My seedlings were somewhat stunted from insufficient light and I didn't let my seedlings adjust enough and many of them have suffered transplant shock from the sudden strong sunlight. The ones that have survived are somewhat stunted and I suspect may be vulnerable to diseases because of their weakened state.

I decided to buy some greenhouse raised tomato plants. I am somewhat spooked by the condition of the greenhouse raised tomato plants; I tried to pick the healthiest ones, yet they all seem to have some leaf roll that I fear could be a symptom of viruses or herbicide damage or some other illness. Other than the leaf roll the plants seem to be largely in excellent condition. There is some yellowing and brown spots on some of the rolled leaves. I already planted some greenhouse tomato plants about a week ago and sprayed them with about a 33% mix of milk and water as a preventive measure. The plants that were planted a week ago seem to be more healthy now, so perhaps having more roots space and healthy soil has helped or perhaps the milk solution helped.

I'm probably just worrying too much. But I was hoping for opinions of others as to what these conditions can be and how seriously should I take it and what actions I should take. I'm tempted just to wait and see what develops.

I posted these photographs as links. I know it's somewhat irritating to do it that way but I think it's more courteous for people with less bandwidth or less powerful computer.

https://img710.imageshack.us/img710/2841/p1010023t.jpg

https://img695.imageshack.us/img695/3535/p1010021e.jpg

https://img63.imageshack.us/img63/108/p1010022o.jpg

https://img710.imageshack.us/img710/2841/p1010023t.jpg

Greenhorn
Full Member
Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 9:10 am
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio

This is from last year. I still am not sure what the problem was. It was a relatively cool summer so that may have enabled conditions for the plants to be more prone to diseases and stunted growth. I got pretty good growth and tomato production in the early part of the summer, but by late summer the plants seemed fairly sickly and tomato production dropped significantly and some of the late-season tomatoes seemed to have some blight (black mildew/mold). Regretfully most of them only get a few hours of direct sun a day. However the plants that received direct sunlight most of the day also seem to be similarly afflicted.

I was growing them and 4 gallon buckets for the most part, and watering them every day with good drainage. For the most part this year I increased the container size.

I wanted to get sweet millions this year because if I understand correctly they are more disease-resistant than the Sweet 100s; but I haven't been able to find anyone that carries them locally.

This year I thought I would use an organic slow-release fertilizer to boost my plants and because I thought it would be more goof resistant then other types of fertilizer. When I first started using the organic fertilizer on my tomatoes ( using tomato-tone) and flowers (using flower tone) the fertilizer seemed to help however now the plants seem to be dying. The leaves are turning yellow with brown or white spots. It seems to look different on different types of plants but have very similar characteristics. I can’t see any parasites (bugs) and treated some of the plants for parasites (bugs); Yet there was no noticeable difference on the control group that I used insecticides on; so that seems to rule out parasites (bugs). I am somewhat skeptical that it’s a virus or bacterium because it has affected a wide variety of plants (tomato plants, Cardinal vines, marigolds, impatiens). Celebrity tomatoes seem largely unaffected; yet my supersweet 100 tomatoes are in dire straits and liable to be a loss for the rest of the year. Several of the marigolds have completely died, while some seem fairly unscathed.

I’ve watered nearly every day and on hot days often twice a day. The weather this summer has been rather unusual in that it hardly ever got above 90°F. For the most part it was an unusually cool and wet summer in this area (Cincinnati, Ohio).

I’m wondering if the tomato-tone and flower-tone might be the problem? Perhaps I’m over fertilizing or need phosphorus and/or potassium?

I’ve tried using sulfur dust on a control group of supersweet 100 cherry tomatoes but they seem to show no signs of improvement.

The tomato plants have practically stopped growing and for the most part aren’t producing any new flowers; yet most of the tomato fruit seems to be healthy and continues to ripen. It’s near the end of the growing season here anyway to make much difference; but I would like to learn so that perhaps I can stop this from happening again next year.

I’m poor and can’t afford a decent digital camera so I just picked a few leaves and put them on my scanner, one up and one down.

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
https://img710.imageshack.us/img710/6854/tomatoleavessick2.jpg

Greenhorn
Full Member
Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 9:10 am
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio

I just noticed that in the last couple of hours that the leaf curl has become much worse. Perhaps the leaf curl isn't in on the mend? Perhaps the leaf curl is worse during the midday because of the heat and dryness; and perhaps the leaves uncurl when the sun sets and the moisture catches up to the rest of the plant and the plant cools off? I'm just speculating wildly trying to figure out what the deal is with the leaf curl.

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