estonehi
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My Desert Rose may be dying :[

Hi, I need some help. The branches from my girlfriends DR has slowly been dying and now the top part of the trunk is easy to squeeze. I initially thought it was some issue with the roots, where nutrients were not getting to the plant because the root system was drying, so I replanted in it small pebbles and rarely water. I saw when repotting that the original pebble mix was very moist and maybe that was killing off the roots. I do not know what to do now..do I cut the softened top part of the DR and hope it recovers, or is there some advice I can get here? Thanks so much! :cry:

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Kisal
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Welcome to the forum! :)

Would it be possible for you to post some pictures of the plant for us? Please take the pictures in good light, and provide different close-up views of the plant and the damaged areas.

([url=https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=3724]Instructions for posting pictures on the forum[/url])

First of all, there are a number of different cacti and succulents commonly known as Desert Rose. Treatment for the problem could vary, depending on which one you have.

In addition, it will be helpful for us to see the actual damage, in order to provide the best advice to you.

Just offhand, it sounds like the plant is suffering from rot. Although rot can rarely, if ever, be cured, new plants can sometimes be started from cuttings, if the rot hasn't progressed too far. :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

estonehi
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Addenium Obesum, I believe is the plant's name. I will try to take some pictures tomorrow. All the of branches are dead, as well as 1 inch or so of the portion where the branches stemmed. The entire plant is probably about a foot or so tall, as has a very thick base. If I cut off the affected area (its the top portion of the plant), it will not prevent further rot? Thanks for your help

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Kisal
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I have not grown that plant. I just finished reading 8 different articles about it, however. They all said that, once rot sets in at the top, the plant most likely cannot be saved.

There was one exception. This article even shows photos of how to cut off the entire top of the swollen stem to stop the progression of rot. Scroll down almost to the end of the article to find the part about disease control. If the disease has not spread too far in yours, perhaps this would be worth a try.

https://www.tropicanursery.com/adenium/cultivation.htm

Sorry I can't be of more help. :(

If you try this method, and it works for you, I would enjoy it if you shared your experience, including photos. Best of luck to you! :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

estonehi
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Current pictures as shown below, I will take a look at your suggestion and likely try it..not much to lose at this point.


[img]https://img690.imageshack.us/img690/2484/042210174202.jpg[/img]

[img]https://img121.imageshack.us/img121/3420/042210174201.jpg[/img]

estonehi
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After reading the article and seeing that my post on another forum suggested cutting, I cut down about 1/4 extra from the rot and saw a white and hard inside, which I assume is a good sign. I patted some cinnamon onto the top and will report back any change. I would only imagine it would not survive such a cut if the roots were not enough to revive the plant, but I wouldn't know for sure. Thanks again.

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Kisal
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My experience salvaging cacti that had begun to develop rot is that if you can cut back to inside flesh that is white and firm, then you have a very good chance of success. I do hope your plant survives and sprouts new branches. :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

SkyKero
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estonehi,

did your desert rose survive??
I am very curious.... :)

Silvia

estonehi
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So far there has been no change. I cut off the top and applied cinnamon. I have been watering a bit once a week. I am concerned that roots may slowly be going, but have no real proof of this. There has been no change in the exposed area..which I am not sure is good at this point. On the bright side, there is no more rot (seemingly) coming down the plant from the top. :?

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Kisal
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If you really want to know what the roots are like, you can slip the plant out of its pot and look at the roots. If the plant is still firm in the soil, though, the roots are most likely just fine.

I hope you'll continue to keep us posted! :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

estonehi
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I had to go away for a week and did not water (since I am afraid to overwater now) and saw that the roots are softening...anything I can do to reverse this or stop what is going on? There has been no more rot from the top...

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Kisal
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Was there any odor to the roots? Mushiness? Mold? If not, then the roots might be okay. I'd leave the plant alone, in that case. If the roots are rotting, though, I know of no cure. :(

If you're really sure you will lose the plant entirely, then you might take it out of the pot, clean off as much of the soil from the roots as you can, trim off any that are obviously rotting, then repot it in fresh soil. I would sterilize the pot before returning the plant to it, or else I would use a new pot, preferably unglazed clay. I think I might also dust the roots with some sort of fungicide. Those are very drastic measures, and there is absolutely no guarantee they will work. Rather like surgery to remove a malignant tumor, I guess. All you can do is try and hope for the best. :(
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

estonehi
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The roots are soft..aka mushy. :[

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Kisal
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estonehi wrote:The roots are soft..aka mushy. :[
I'm sorry to hear that sad news. :(
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

Green Mantis
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How fast do desert cactuses grow?

How long does it take for a desert rose to grow? Mine seems to be very slow growing! Then when it gets lovely leaves, they often drop off? They either dry up or go a little soft, Why would they do that? Thanks in advance. :lol:
Kathy Lovejoy

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Kisal
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Desert cacti are quite slow-growing as a rule. Is your Desert Rose an Addenium Obesum?

Addenium Obesum will, at times and under certain conditions, go dormant. These periods of dormancy are sometimes caused by temperatures lower than what are ideal for the plant, but can also be caused by insufficient or irregular watering. These plants can take more water than most people realize, but the growing medium must drain extremely rapidly. The plant also needs warmth in order to flourish. :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

Green Mantis
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Not sure what kind of desert rose, but it looks just like the one that has gone all soft in previous pictures on this thread. I water it with distilled water, as our well water is very hard. Also gets watered from the bottom. I do water it a lot, it seems pretty thirsty. :? I think that might be the problem. We need to replace some windows, near where it is. Maybe a draft bothered it?
Kathy Lovejoy

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