jackal_man
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What kind of onion is this?

[img]https://img455.imageshack.us/img455/3985/dscf02328hi.jpg[/img]
My father got them from his father and we haven't a clue what kind of onion it is
[img]https://img304.imageshack.us/img304/56/dscf02350fg.jpg[/img]
these pieces grow on top sometimes they grow pieces also and grow more tops, it is a very strange type to me. i believe it is a perennial since the original piece will grow the next year
[img]https://img339.imageshack.us/img339/1969/dscf02380wz.jpg[/img]
this is the bottom piece of course, I have never seen it grow much larger then that.

Thge plant seems to do well in various parts of the property, I just hope it doesn't become invasivish like the onion chives which will grow just like grass popping even out of the cracks in the driveway...

so any help in giving me an idea of what this plant is would be great! :)

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Grey
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Pearl Onion maybe?
So cool that you have an "onion" heirloom :) Are they super-strong?

jackal_man
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not sure what you mean exactly by super strong, i know they can survive the winter weather quite well, the tops will start growing during the winter even with little light and no water given to them.

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Grey
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I mean the taste - eye-wateringly strong? I'm just wondering :)

jackal_man
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I believe they are somewhat strong in flavour I have rarely ate anything with them, i had the chive type piece of them before raw, it didn't seem to strong either

grandpasrose
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This is an Egyptian Onion, "Allium Cepa", also known as Walking Onion. It grows to a height of 18-24", and should be planted 6-9" apart. They are hardy in Plant Hardiness Zones 3b to 10. Full sun, PH of 6.1 - 7.5, regular watering without overwatering are their only specific needs.

They bloom in mid-summer with pink, yellow, or white blooms. The stalks can be eaten as chives or green onions, while the bottom rhizome and top bulblets can be eaten as normal onion. They have a strong flavour.

Egyptian Onions can be propogated either by splitting the rhizome, planting the bulblets, or planting the seed when ripe from inside the bulblets. They self seed if left alone, so if you don't want too many, cut the bulblets off, and only leave a few to carry one for next year. You could also tie a paper bag over a couple of bulblets to catch the seed once it ripens, and plant them yourself.

Hope this gives you the information you need, if not, feel free to drop in again! :wink:

Val
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)

jackal_man
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thanks for the info, they are very quck to grow, i find them interesting to look at when they have the bulbs on top starting to grow their own chive part.

would you consider them to be semi invasive? I know onion chives will start to grow everywhere (and just like grass in the cracks of the pavement) when left to seed and i have found for egyption onion all together growing in the grass, which were dug up and moved into the garden.

grandpasrose
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When a plant is left to go to seed naturally, it's seeds are spread by wind, birds, animals, etc. and can end up anywhere. Just because some end up growing outside of their assigned garden does not make them invasive. Invasive means that they have taken over and are forcing out any other plant growth.
It's like I find viola plants all over my yard, even though I only ever planted them in my rose garden, but I don't consider them invasive.
I don't think you need to worry! :wink:

Val
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)

jackal_man
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what would you call a plant that spreads quickly then? things like the iris and lillies, i planted some of the onion down at the furthest part of the yard, and i want them to spread out.

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Grey
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I'm sure there's a technical name for it that I can't think of right now - but to me a plant that spreads quickly is a great one to divide & give to friends :)

jackal_man
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or if it spreads from 50 to 300 give to people you don't even know that well! :D so many irises -.-

grandpasrose
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Yes it is true that some perennials are much more vigourous than others, but that does not necessarily make them invasive. There is a common misconception that once a perennial is planted, that's all there is to it. Not so. All perennials will need division and cleaning up every couple or few years. With vigourous perennials, this of course occurs sooner, rather than later, but as Grey says, all the more to give away or trade for others you don't have!
Or if you are like me, you are constantly building new gardens, so over time, you become your own plant supplier, just taking bits off of each plant to make a new bed!! :wink:

Val
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)

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